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Cancer Drugs Fund ‘huge waste of money’

Image copyright Thinkstock

The Cancer Drugs Fund in England was a “huge waste of money” and may have caused patients to suffer unnecessarily from the side effects of the drugs, according to UK researchers.

The fund ran from 2010 to 2016, costing £1.27bn, following an election promise made by the Conservatives to pay for cancer drugs the NHS was not funding.

The researchers found only one in five of the treatments was of benefit.

But the Tories said the fund gave patients “precious extra time”.

Nearly 100,000 patients received drugs under the scheme. It was run separately to the normal NHS process for assessing the effectiveness and affordability of new drugs, which is administered by a body called NICE.

The fund was promised by the Conservatives during the 2010 election campaign amid concern patients were not always getting access to the latest drugs.


Five things £1.27bn can pay for in the NHS (over five years)

  • 10,000 nurses
  • 2,500 hospital consultants
  • One of England’s 10 regional ambulance services
  • A one-off pay rise of 2.5% for every member of NHS staff
  • An extra 20 GP surgeries

But lead researcher Prof Richard Sullivan, from King’s College London, described it as “policy on the hoof” because of the way it was announced.

“Populism doesn’t work when you are dealing with complex areas of policy like this. When it was launched it was not monitored properly. It was politically and intellectually lazy.”

He said it was not only politicians who were guilty, but leading doctors and cancer charities for not speaking out against the fund or scrutinising it more.

And he said by the end the initiative had proved to be a “huge waste of money” and a “major policy error”, saying it was telling that in 2015 the committee that controlled the fund started delisting drugs and ended up striking off more than half the treatments from the list.

David CameronImage caption David Cameron announced the Cancer Drugs Fund policy during the 2010 election campaign

The fund was eventually brought under the remit of NICE last year and is now used to pay for treatments it believes there is a case to fund.

The study, which was published in the Annals of Oncology journal, looked at the 47 treatments that were being funded by January 2015, the point at which drugs started to be listed because the cost of the fund was spiralling out of control.

They found only 18% met internationally recognised criteria for being deemed clinically beneficial.

This led them to conclude that a majority of patients may well have suffered because of side effects that the drugs can cause.

This can include anything from hair loss, upset stomachs and swelling in joints to an increased risk of stroke.

Of the drugs where there was some evidence of benefit, the average was an extra 3.2 months of survival.

Emlyn Samuel, of Cancer Research UK, agreed with the researchers that the fund “wasn’t fit for purpose”.

He said the charity would be closely monitoring the impact of the new system administered by NICE.

To view the original article CLICK HERE

On a more informed & informative basis in medical terms – for those seeking more in depth analysis:

Do patient access schemes for high-cost cancer drugs deliver value to society?—lessons from the NHS Cancer Drugs Fund

Background

The NHS Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) was established in 2010 to reduce delays and improve access to cancer drugs, including those that had been previously appraised but not approved by NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence). After 1.3 billion GBP expenditure, a UK parliamentary review in 2016 rationalized the CDF back into NICE.

Methods

This paper analyses the potential value delivered by the CDF according to six value criteria. This includes validated clinical benefits scales, cost-effectiveness criteria as defined by NICE and an assessment of real-world data. The analysis focuses on 29 cancer drugs approved for 47 indications that could be prescribed through the CDF in January 2015.

Results

Of the 47 CDF approved indications, only 18 (38%) reported a statistically significant OS benefit, with an overall median survival of 3.1 months (1.4–15.7 months). When assessed according to clinical benefit scales, only 23 (48%) and 9 (18%) of the 47 drug indications met ASCO and ESMO criteria, respectively. NICE had previously rejected 26 (55%) of the CDF approved indications because they did not meet cost-effectiveness thresholds. Four drugs—bevacizumab, cetuximab, everolimus and lapatinib—represented the bulk of CDF applications and were approved for a total of 18 separate indications. Thirteen of these indications were subsequently delisted by the CDF in January 2015 due to insufficient evidence for clinical benefit—data which were unchanged since their initial approval.

Conclusions

We conclude the CDF has not delivered meaningful value to patients or society. There is no empirical evidence to support a ‘drug only’ ring fenced cancer fund relative to concomitant investments in other cancer domains such as surgery and radiotherapy, or other noncancer medicines. Reimbursement decisions for all drugs and interventions within cancer care should be made through appropriate health technology appraisal processes.

Introduction

The Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) was established in 2010 by the UK government to provide patients with access to cancer drugs not available through the NHS, because the drugs had not been appraised, were in the process of being appraised, or had been appraised but not recommended by the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE). As well as reducing delays and improving access to cancer drugs within the NHS it also offered an opportunity to provide funding for orphan indications or rare conditions that NICE would ordinarily not appraise [1].

The CDF had an initial budget of £50 million per annum with the plan to move towards a value-based pricing scheme by 2014. However, the costs of maintaining the fund rapidly increased, with the budget set at £200 million in 2013/2014, £280 million in 2014/2015, and £340 million in 2015/2016. At the time of its unification with NICE (see Figure 1), the CDF had cost of UK taxpayer a total of £1.27 billion [2], the equivalent of 1 year’s total spend on all cancer drugs in the NHS [3].

Figure 1.

Current status of the CDF Nov 2016.

Despite an extensive public consultation, fundamental issues about whether the CDF was a beneficial and fair public policy decision that actually delivered value have been absent from the discourse. Such analysis is essential to inform pharmaceutical policy in other countries contemplating such patient access pathways for high-cost cancer drugs.

Methods

In this policy analysis, we review the utility of such patient access funds for pharmaceutical agents by assessing the value delivered to both individuals and society by the CDF. Six value criteria have been used in our analysis. This includes an assessment of:

  1. The index trial data that provided the evidence for the drugs’ efficacy
  2. Observational studies assessing the effectiveness of selected CDF approved drugs in ‘real world’ populations
  3. The value of approved drugs according to validated clinical benefit scales developed by The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO)
  4. Whether the drugs would meet cost-effectiveness thresholds set by NICE
  5. The CDF committee’s own review (in January and November 2015) of drugs they had approved
  6. The value delivered by CDF-approved drugs to NHS patients based on utilization patterns

These criteria were chosen as they provide a multi-dimensional approach to assessing value in the absence of clinical data on outcomes for patients receiving drugs through the CDF. The first measures clinical efficacy based on the index clinical trial data, and the second, the translation of trial efficacy to a real world population in light of the socio-demographic make-up of trial participants. The third criteria goes beyond a simple evaluation of absolute study end-points to assess meaningful benefit according to value scales developed by two professional bodies, ASCO and ESMO.

The fourth looks at the issue of distributive justice by assessing cost-effectiveness according to health technology assessment frameworks, in this case NICE. The fifth criteria, represents an evaluation of the CDF committee’s own audit of each of the approved drugs and indications using their own value framework undertaken in January and November 2015. The sixth and final criteria collates the evidence for value based on patterns of use of CDF drugs (dose, volume) where data is available and the likely benefits that have been derived when considering the index trial data.

We focus on the systemic therapies that were made available and could be prescribed through the CDF prior to the January 2015 update when the fund was first rationalized [4]. Up to this point, 29 drugs had been approved for 47 indications, three of which—bevacizumab (9), cetuximab (4), and everolimus (3)—had been approved for more than two indications.

Results

Did sufficient clinical evidence exist to suggest patients would benefit from CDF approved drugs?

On review of the index trial data for the 47 drug indications approved by the CDF [5–53], only 18 (38%) reported a statistically significant overall survival (OS) benefit (Table 1) [5–7, 9, 13, 14, 18, 20, 23, 26, 27, 38, 41, 44, 45, 47, 50, 51] The median OS benefit was 3.2 months, ranging from 1.4 months (hazard ratio 0.82) for aflibercept in metastatic bowel cancer [6] to 15.7 months (HR 0.68) for pertuzumab in first line metastatic Her-2 positive breast cancer [44].

Table 1

Details of the cancer drugs available through the NHS Cancer Drugs Fund prior to the first update in January 2015

Drug  Site  Indication  Author of index trial [REF]  Primary endpoint (s)  Median age  PS 0/1 (%)  PFS (HR)  OS (HR)  Approval on ASCO criteria  ESMO score  NICE status Jan 2015  CDF status Jan 2015  CDF status Nov 2015 
Abiraterone  Prostate  1st line CRPC (pre chemo)  Ryan 2014 [5 PFS/OS  71  100  8.3 (0.53)  4.3 (0.80)  Yes  Not approved  Approved  Approved 
Aflibercept  Bowel  2nd line metastastic CRC with irinotecan/5FU  Van Cutsem 2012 [6 OS  61  98  2.2 (0.76)  1.4 (0.82)  No  Not approved  Removed  Removed 
Albumin bound paclitaxel  Pancreas  1st line metastatic pancreatic cancer with gemcitabine  Von Hoff 2013 [7 OS  63  KS > 80 = 92%  1.8 (0.69)  1.8 (0.72)  No  Not approved  Approved  Removed 
Axitinib  Renal  2nd line advanced RCC  Motzer 2013 [8 PFS  61  99  2.6 (0.66)  NS  No  Awaiting appraisal  Approved  Approved by NICE therefore removed 
Bevacizumab  Cervix  1st line Metastatic cervical ca  Tewari 2014 [9 OS/Toxicity  46  96  2.3 (0.67)  3.7 (0.71)  Yes  Awaiting appraisal  Approved  Approved 
Bevacizumab  Breast  Metastatic triple negative breast cancer  Miller 2007 [10 PFS  56  98  5.9 (0.6)  NS  No  Not approved  Approved  Removed 
Bevacizumab  Bowel  1st line advanced CRC with 5FU  Cunningham 2013 [11 PFS  76  91  4 (0.53)  NS  No  Not appraised  Removed  Removed 
Bevacizumab  Bowel  1st line metastatic CRC with oxaliplatin based regimen  Saltz 2008 [12 PFS  60  100  1.4 (0.83)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Removed 
Bevacizumab  Bowel  1st line metastatic CRC with irinotecan based regimen  Hurwitz 2004 [13 OS  59  99  4.4 (0.54)  4.7 (0.66)  Yes  Not approved  Removed  Removed 
Bevacizumab  Bowel  2nd line/3rd line metastatic CRC with oxaliplatin based chemo  Giantonio 2007 [14 OS  61  96  2.6 (0.61)  2.1 (0.75)  No  Not approved  Approved  Removed 
Bevacizumab  Bowel  3rd line in low grade gliomas of childhood with irinotecan  Gururangan 2013 [15 PFS  8.4  KS > 50 = 100%  PFS 85% at 6 months, 48% at 2 yrs  NR  Uncertain  Not appraised  Approved  Approved 
Bevacizumab  Ovarian  1st line advanced ovarian, peritoneal or fallopian cancer  Burger 2011 [16 PFS  60  93  3.8 (0.72)  NS  No  Not approved  Approved  Approved 
Bevacizumab  Ovarian  2nd line advanced ovarian, fallopian or primary peritoneal cancers (platinum sensitive)  Aghajanian 2012 [17 PFS  61  99.5  4 (0.48)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Removed 
Cabazitaxel  Prostate  Metastatic CRPC previously treated with docetaxel  De bono 2010 [18 OS  67  93  1.4 (0.7)  2.4 (0.7)  No  Not approved  Removed  Reinstated 
Cabozantinib  Thyroid  1st line advanced medullary thyroid cancer  Elisei 2013 [19 PFS  55  56% PS = 0  7.2 (0.28)  NS  Yes  Awaiting appraisal  Approved  Approved 
Cetuximab  Head and Neck cancer  Advanced Head and Neck Cancer  Vermoken 2008 [20 OS  57  KS > 80 = 80%  2.3 (0.54)  2.7 (0.8)  No  Not approved  Approved  Approved 
Cetuximab  Bowel  1st line metastatic CRC (K ras wild type) with oxaliplatin or irinotecan based regimens  Tejpar 2012 [21 Pooled subgroup analysis  60  95  1.4 (0.47)  NS  Yes  Not approved for all indications  Approved  Approved 
Cetuximab  Bowel  2nd or 3rd line treatment of metastatic CRC (K ras wild type) with irinotecan  Sobrero 2008 [22 OS  61  94  2.4 (0.69)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Removed 
Cetuximab  Bowel  3rd or 4th line metastatic CRC (K ras wild type) as single agent  Karapetis 2008 [23 OS  63  80  1.8 (0.40)  4.7 (0.55)  Yes  Not approved  Approved  Removed 
Crizotinib  Lung  2nd line ALK +ve advanced/metastastic NSCLC  Shaw 2013 [24 PFS  51  92  4.7 (0.49)  NR  Yes  Not approved  Approved  Approved 
Dabrafenib  Melanoma  Unresectable or metastatic melanoma with a BRAF V600 mutation and intolerance to Vemurafenib  Hauschild 2014 [25 PFS  52  66% PS = 0  2.4 (0.3)  NR  Yes  Appraisal ongoing  Approved  Approved by NICE therefore removed 
Enzalutamide  Prostate  1st line CRPC (pre-chemo)  Beer 2014 [26 PFS/OS  72  100  >12 months (0.19)  2.2 (0.71)  Uncertain  Awaiting appraisal  Approved  Approved 
Eribulin  Breast  3rd line metastatic breast cancer  Cortes 2011 [27 OS  55  92  1.5 (0.87)  2.5 (0.81)  No  Not approved  Removed  Reinstated 
Everolimus  Breast  Metastatic breast cancer in combination with exemestane  Baselga 2012 [28]/Piccart 2014 [29 PFS  62  96  4.6 (0.43)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Reinstated 
Everolimus  PNET  1st or 2nd line moderately differentiated PNET  Yao 2011/2014 [30,31 PFS  58  97  6.4 (0.27)  NS  No  Awaiting appraisal  Approved  Removed 
Everolimus  PNET  Well differentiated PNET  Yao 2011/2014 [30,31 PFS  58  97  6.4 (0.27)  NS  No  Awaiting appraisal  Removed  Removed 
Everolimus  Renal  Metastatic RCC  Motzer 2010 [32 PFS  61  KS > 80 = 91%  3 (0.33)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Reinstated 
Imatinib  Sarcoma (GIST)  Adjuvant therapy for completely resected GIST at high relapse risk  Dematteo 2009 [33 RFS  59  99  RFS gain 13%  NR  Yes  Awaiting appraisal  Approved  Approved by NICE therefore removed 
Lapatinib  Breast  Advanced breast cancer, Her 2 +ve  Geyer 2006 [34]/cameron 2008 [35 PFS  54  100  4 (0.47)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Removed 
Panitumimab  Bowel  3rd or 4th line metastatic CRC (Kras wild type) as single agent  Van Cutsem 2007 [36 PFS  62  82  1.1 (0.54)  NS  No  Not approved  Approved  Removed 
Panitumimab  Bowel  1st line metastatic CRC with Folofox 4 or irinotecan (Kras wild type)  Douillard 2010 [37]/Douillard 2014 [38 PFS  62  94  1.4 (0.80)  4.4 (0.88)  Yes  Awaiting appraisal  Approved  Approved 
Pazopinib  Sarcoma  Advanced non-adipocytic soft tissue carcinoma  van der Graaf 2012 [39 PFS  56  100  3 (0.31)  NS  No  Not appraised  Removed  Removed 
Pegylated liposomal doxirubicin  Sarcoma  1st or 2nd line for angiosarcoma  Judson 2001 [40 Toxicity/RR  52  86  NA  NA  Uncertain  Uncertain  Not appraised  Removed  Removed 
Pegylated liposomal doxirubicin  Sarcoma  For patients with sarcoma with cardiac impairment or contraindication to doxorubicin  Judson 2001 [40 Toxicity/RR  52  86  NA  NA  Uncertain  Not appraised  Approved  Approved 
Pemtrexed  Lung  Maintenance post 4 cycles cisplatin/pemetrexed for NSCLC  Ciuleanu 2009 [41 PFS  60  100  1.7 (0.5)  2.8 (0.79)  Yes  Not approved  Removed  Reinstated 
Pemetrexed  Lung  2nd line NSCLC  Hanna 2004 [42 OS  59  88  NS  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Removed 
Lutetium Octreotate/Yttrium Octreotide  NETs  For inoperable well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) with progressive disease  Kam 2012 [43 Symptoms/tumour regression  NR  NR  NA  NA  No  Not appraised  Approved  Removed 
Pertuzumab  Breast  1st line locally advanced Her2 +ve breast cancer  Swain 2013 [44 PFS  54  99  6.3 (0.69)  15.7 (0.68)  Yes  Not approved  Approved  Approved 
Radium 223  Prostate  CRPC and bone mets, no visceral mets  Parker 2013 [45 OS  71  87  NR  3.6 (0.7)  Yes  Awaiting appraisal  Approved  Approved by NICE therefore removed 
Regorafinib  Sarcoma (GIST)  Imatinib and sunitinib resistant GIST  Demetri 2013 [46 PFS  60  100  3.9 (0.27)  NR  No  Not appraised  Removed  Reinstated 
Sorafenib  Liver  1st line HCC  Llovet 2008 [47 OS/Time to symptom progression  65  92  2.7 (0.58)  2.8 (0.69)  Yes  Not approved  Approved  Approved 
Sorafenib  Thyroid  Metastatic/inoperable thyroid cancer refractory to radioiodine  Brose 2014 [48 PFS  63  97  5 (0.8)  NR  Yes  Not appraised  Approved  Approved 
Sunitinib  PNET  well differentiated PNET  Raymond 2011 [49 PFS  56  100  5.9 (0.42)  Trial stopped early  Uncertain  Not appraised  Approved  Approved 
Temsirolimus  Renal  Advanced RCC  Hudes 2007 [50 OS  59  KS > 70 = 17%  2.4  3.6 (0.73)  Yes  Not approved  Approved  Approved 
Trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla)  Breast  Relapsed Her 2 +ve breast cancer  Verma 2012 [51 PFS/OS and safety  53  99  3.2 (0.65)  5.8 (0.68)  Yes  Not approved  Approved  Approved 
Vandetinib  Thyroid  Medullary thyroid ca  Wells 2012 [52 PFS  51  96  11.2 (0.46)  NR  Yes  Not appraised  Approved  Approved 
Vismodegib  Skin  Metastatic basal cell cancer  Sekulic 2012 [53 Objective response rate  62  NR  NA  NA  Uncertain  Not appraised  Approved  Approved 

OS, overall survival (months); PFS, progression free survival (months); HR, median hazard ratio; TTP, Time to progression; ASCO, American Society of Clinical Oncology; ESMO, European Society of Medical Oncology; PS, Eastern cooperative oncology group performance score; KS, Karnofsky score; NR; not reported; NS, not statistically significant; NA, endpoint not assessed; CRC, colorectal cancer; RCC, renal cell cancer; CRPC, castrate resistant prostate cancer; PNET, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour; HCC, hepatocellular carcinoma; GIS, gastrointestinal stromal tumour; NSCLC, non small cell lung cancer.

Of the remaining 29 indications in the CDF, 17 were approved despite no statistically significant OS benefit being observed in the index trials. These included axitinib [8] bevacizumab (five indications) [10–12, 16, 17], cabozantinib [19], cetuximab (two indications) [21, 22], everolimus (four indications) [29–32], lapatinib [35], panitumimab [36], pazopanib [39], and pemetrexed [42]. The primary end-point of 14 of these studies was PFS, of which five allowed cross-over of the control population at progression to the intervention arm [30–32, 35, 36] and one had significant post-study utilization (49.6%) of the intervention drug among the control arm [22].

12 further indications had been approved without OS data being available. The primary end-point in the index trial for eight of these indications was PFS [15, 24, 25, 33, 36, 46, 48, 49, 52] of which five allowed cross-over of the control population at progression [24, 25, 46, 48, 52]. The other four indications were not able to report any PFS or OS benefit as they were based on noncomparator studies [40, 43, 53].

Given that over half of the drug indications (n =29) approved by the CDF lacked any OS benefit, it is valid to ask whether a gain in PFS is a meaningful surrogate endpoint for OS. While we acknowledge this is a subject of much debate as there are differences of opinion as to what constitutes benefit, there is unanimity that prolongation of OS is an unequivocal benefit and desired [54–57]. From a patient’s perspective, a gain in PFS may not equate to a clinical benefit given the serious toxicities that arise from many of these therapies, including those classified as ‘targeted’ and the fact that progression often occurs without any symptoms such that delaying progression is not delaying symptoms [58].

Furthermore, the extent to which benefits claimed in clinical trials are true can be debated. For end-points such as OS and PFS, it is expected that all patients randomized at the start of the study are followed up until either the end point is reached or the study is completed (intention-to-treat analysis). If a patient is censored prior to the end point being reached, their outcome is estimated based on other patients in the same arm who have not reached the end point, but have been under longer follow-up. This will result in an over-estimation of benefit if their reason for being censored is linked to their prognosis, i.e. toxicity, low participation in follow-up, or the initiation of an alternative therapy [59]. This type of censoring is more common in the assessment of PFS compared with OS where censoring predominantly occurs as a result of a death [60].

In PFS analyses, censoring is often driven by drug toxicity and the extent of censoring as regards PFS has been increasing in many trials (disproportionately so in the experimental arm) rendering the results questionable as to the true benefit observed [61, 62]. Several of the indications for drug funding on the CDF were based on trials in which excessive censoring was a feature [19, 28, 30]. For everolimus plus exemestane in breast cancer, the 4.4 months difference in OS was not significant although the PFS difference of 4.6 months was highly significant albeit in the setting of excessive censoring in the everolimus arm due to toxicity [28, 62].

Could the reported clinical trial benefits be realized in the ‘real world’?

Randomized control trials (RCTs), have strong internal validity through randomization, pre-specified end points and blinding, however their external validity is limited [63]. This is because patients similar to those frequently encountered in a clinical practice are often excluded, raising questions as to the generalizability of clinical trial results to populations, settings or conditions not reflected in the trial [64, 65].

For example, the median age of study participants in the index trials of CDF approved drugs was 60 (Table 1). Over 90% of the study populations had an Eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG) performance status score of 0 or 1 (or equivalent) in the majority of the trials. The under-representation of men and women over 65 in RCTs is a long-standing issue [66, 67]. As a result, decision-makers are expressing interest in ‘real world data’ [68].

In metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), data from the ‘real world’ provide a sobering assessment of outcomes. The International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database consortium study found that the 35% of patients that did not meet trial eligibility criteria had a disappointing 12.3 months survival compared with 28.4 months survival in those that would have been deemed trial-eligible [69]. A recent study that analysed the SEER 18 (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results) registry database to calculate the relative survival rates for advanced RCC patients during 2001–2005, 2006–2007 and 2008–2009 concluded there was no significant improvement in relative survival rates among patients with mRCC in the era of targeted agents [70].

Increased rates of toxicity are also observed in real world populations. A US SEER database study evaluated the effectiveness of adding bevacizumab to first-line combination chemotherapy for Medicare patients (aged 65 years and over) with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) [71]. The data showed unequivocally there was no benefit to adding bevacizumab to FOLFOX-based regimens in this Medicare population, but importantly the addition of bevacizumab increased the risk of stroke (4.9% versus 2.5%, respectively; P<0.01) and GI perforation (2.3% versus 1.0%, respectively; P<0.01).

From a clinical standpoint would oncologists consider the predicted benefits of the CDF approved drugs to be clinically meaningful?

In many cases, the answer appears to be no. In 2014, The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) published what it considered meaningful clinical benefit in the hopes the design of future clinical trials would produce results that would be valuable for patients, i.e. meaningful improvements in survival, quality of life or both [72]. The ASCO Cancer Research Committee (CRC) that developed the criteria deliberately chose modest threshold to ensure their relevance and attainability. OS was chosen as the primary clinical end-point of interest and minimum gains in survival and HR thresholds were defined for each tumour type, virtually all in the metastatic setting. Secondary end-points included PFS, and thresholds for OS and PFS were adjusted depending on the toxicity profile of the drug.

An analysis of drugs approved by the FDA between 2002 and 2014 for the treatment of solid tumours found that only 42% of the 71 approved drugs met the ASCO or comparable standards [73]. Similarly, only 23 (48%) of the 47 CDF approved drug indications met the very modest ASCO criteria with uncertainty regarding six drug indications (see Table 1).

In 2015, The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), produced further guidelines (following consultation with over 250 of its expert membership) to stipulate the boundaries for meaningful clinical benefit [74]. The scoring scheme was based on:

  • Treatment intent (curative versus noncurative)
  • Expected duration of PFS and OS in the control arm
  • PFS or OS benefit including the hazard ratios
  • Evidence of improved or worsening toxicity profiles
  • Evidence for improvement in quality of life

Cancer drugs indicated in the noncurative setting are scored 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest), and those in the curative setting are graded A (highest) or B (lowest). Drugs scoring 4, 5 or A are considered to provide a high level of proven clinical benefit according to the criteria. Our analysis of the 47 drug indications on the CDF found that only 9 (18%) indications achieved scores of 4, 5 or A, (see Table 1) while 23 (50%) of drug indications scored 2 or less on the ESMO scale, i.e. they were based on study data which had demonstrated limited evidence of clinical benefit. The nine indications that met ESMO criteria for meaningful clinical benefit included, cetuximab for colorectal cancer [23], crizotinib for lung cancer [24], dabrafenib for metastatic melanoma [25], imatinib as adjuvant therapy for GIST [33], pertuzumab and trastuzumab emtansine for breast cancer [44, 51], temsirolimus for renal cell cancer [50], radium 223 for prostate cancer [45] and pegylated doxorubicin for sarcoma [40].

Would an HTA body, in this instance NICE, consider the benefits of drugs on CDF of sufficient value to be reimbursed?

In the UK, NICE is responsible for ensuring rational and fair decisions are made on resource allocations by performing cost effectiveness analyses for new health interventions. The advantage of the cost per QALY is its universality when making decisions regarding the entire spectrum of health care interventions across all specialities [75]. NICE focus on both short and long-term outcomes of treatment and direct patient benefits [76].

We found that 26 (55%) CDF approved drugs had previously been rejected by NICE on the grounds of not meeting cost effectiveness criteria. Three (dabrafenib, imatinib and radium 223) were due to receive approval in early 2015 (Table 1). Seven were awaiting appraisal but draft consultation advice had been issued. Eleven indications had not been appraised and no plans for their assessment were evident. In some cases, this was due to the rarity of the disease (e.g. regorafenib, in soft tissue sarcoma) or their off-label use (bevacizumab third line in paediatric low-grade glioma).

What the CDF committee considered the value of CDF approved drugs to be?

The CDF committee undertook detailed assessment of each of the drugs listed in its access scheme in January and November 2015 using a bespoke framework to assess its value. This included, but was not limited to, PFS, OS, quality of life, toxicity, unmet need and cost [77]. In total, 24 indications (51% of all indications) for 14 drugs were removed from the CDF list following this appraisal, of which six were later reinstated.

Table 2 summarizes details about four drugs whose value to the NHS can be debated: bevacizumab, lapatinib, cetuximab, and everolimus. These four drugs were approved by the CDF for 18 separate indications—bevacizumab (9), cetuximab (4), everolimus (4) and lapatinib (1). Following the initial review of the CDF in January 2015, nine of these indications were delisted. A further four indications were delisted in November 2015, following a subsequent review. The value delivered by bevacizumab in particular is debatable given that six of the nine indications were delisted. Only one of these indications would have met ASCO criteria and none would have achieved the ESMO meaningful clinical benefit criteria, or NICE cost-effective thresholds.

Table 2

Details of four drugs—bevacizumab, cetuximab, everolimus and lapatinib—which were approved by the CDF for 18 separate indications prior to January 2015

Drug  Site  Indication  Author of index trial [REF]  PFS (HR)  OS (HR)  Approval on ASCO criteria  ESMO score  NICE status Jan 2015  CDF status Jan 2015  CDF status Nov 2015 
Bevacizumab  Cervix  1st line metastatic cervical ca  Tewari 2014 [9 2.3 (0.67)  3.7 (0.71)  Yes  Awaiting appraisal  Approved  Approved 
Bevacizumab  Breast  Metastatic triple negative breast cancer  Miller 2007 [10 5.9 (0.6)  NS  No  Not approved  Approved  Removed 
Bevacizumab  Bowel  1st line advanced CRC with 5FU  Cunningham 2013 [11 4 (0.53)  NS  No  Not appraised  Removed  Removed 
Bevacizumab  Bowel  1st line metastatic CRC with oxaliplatin-based regimen  Saltz 2008 [12 1.4 (0.83)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Removed 
Bevacizumab  Bowel  1st line metastatic CRC with irinotecan-based regimen  Hurwitz 2004 [13 4.4 (0.54)  4.7 (0.66)  Yes  Not approved  Removed  Removed 
Bevacizumab  Bowel  2nd line/3rd line metastatic CRC with oxaliplatin-based chemo  Giantonio 2007 [14 2.6 (0.61)  2.1 (0.75)  No  Not approved  Approved  Removed 
Bevacizumab  Bowel  3rd line in low-grade gliomas of childhood with irinotecan  Gururangan 2013 [15 PFS 85% at 6 months, 48% at 2 yrs  NR  Uncertain  Not appraised  Approved  Approved 
Bevacizumab  Ovarian  1st line advanced ovarian, peritoneal or fallopian cancer  Burger 2011 [16 3.8 (0.72)  NS  No  Not approved  Approved  Approved 
Bevacizumab  Ovarian  2nd line advanced ovarian, fallopian or primary peritoneal cancers (platinum sensitive)  Aghajanian 2012 [17 4 (0.48)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Removed 
Cetuximab  Head and Neck cancer  Advanced head and neck cancer  Vermoken 2008 [20 2.3 (0.54)  2.7 (0.8)  No  Not approved  Approved  Approved 
Cetuximab  Bowel  1st line metastatic CRC (K ras wild-type) with oxaliplatin or irinotecan-based regimens  Tejpar 2012 [21 1.4 (0.47)  NS  Yes  Approved for specific indications  Approved  Approved 
Cetuximab  Bowel  2nd or 3rd line treatment of metastatic CRC (K ras wild-type) with irinotecan  Sobrero 2008 [22 2.4 (0.69)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Removed 
Cetuximab  Bowel  3rd or 4th line metastatic CRC (K ras wild-type) as single agent  Karapetis 2008 [23 1.8 (0.40)  4.7 (0.55)  Yes  Not approved  Approved  Removed 
Everolimus  Breast  Metastatic breast cancer in combination with exemestane  Baselga 2012 [28]/Piccart 2014 [29 4.6 (0.43)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Reinstated 
Everolimus  PNET  1st or 2nd line moderately differentiated PNET  Yao 2011/2014 [30, 31 6.4 (0.27)  NS  No  Awaiting appraisal  Approved  Removed 
Everolimus  PNET  Well differentiated PNET  Yao 2011/2014 [30, 31 6.4 (0.27)  NS  No  Awaiting appraisal  Removed  Removed 
Everolimus  Renal  Metastatic RCC  Motzer 2010 [32 3 (0.33)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Reinstated 
Lapatinib  Breast  Advanced breast cancer, Her 2 +ve  Geyer 2006 [34]/Cameron 2008 [35 4 (0.47)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Removed 

OS, overall survival (months); PFS, progression free survival (months); HR, median hazard ratio; ASCO, American Society of Clinical Oncology; ESMO, European Society of Medical Oncology; NR, not reported; NS, not statistically significant; NA, endpoint not assessed; CRC, colorectal cancer; RCC, renal cell cancer; PNET, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour.

In this respect, the criteria and value judgements initially used by the CDF has been criticized for its lack of rigour and relevance for prioritizing drugs for reimbursement through the fund [78]. The tabulation also underscores the fluid nature of the CDF and raises questions as to whether approvals were occurring too quickly or are being driven by factors other than academic/scientific considerations.

Is there any evidence that the CDF has been of value to NHS cancer patients?

At the time of commencement in 2010, it was expected that basic outcome data would be collected from April 2012 including the date of treatment cessation, side effects observed, 30-day mortality and date of death/next relapse. However, even after audit data collection became mandatory in 2014, 93% of outcome data was incomplete for 2014–2015 [79].

We therefore have no evidence as to whether recipients of drugs from the CDF derived any meaningful benefit in terms of survival, improved quality of life or decreased episodes of toxicity. As a proxy, we have attempted to define the value achieved by NHS cancer patients receiving cancer drugs through the CDF by assessing actual patterns of drug utilization, in conjunction with their anticipated benefits according to the original trial data.

Stephens and Thomson in 2012 [80] using IMS health dispensing data demonstrated that between April and December 2011, 59% of CDF applications were for five drugs: bevacizumab, lapatinib, sorafenib, cetuximab, and everolimus; a prescribing pattern confirmed by Chamberlain et al. in a subsequent analysis examining the period from October 2007 to October 2012 [81]. No data on the volume of drugs utilized has since been made available, nor information on patient weight or number of cycles completed by each patient.

The study reported that following the introduction of the CDF there were statistically significant increases in utilization of bevacizumab (2-fold), and lapatinib (3-fold), and these together with sorafenib, cetuximab, and sunitinib constituted a significant proportion of drug prescriptions. The exact indication for which these drugs were prescribed remains unknown. Analysis of the volume data found that the growth in drug utilization was lower than expected when compared with the doses and duration of treatment received by patients enrolled in the original RCTs. This is therefore likely to reflect earlier disease progression, or the occurrence of intolerable adverse events, suggesting their clinical effectiveness and tolerability do not match results in the RCTs [82]. In addition, there was evidence of inequitable access to the fund across English regions (2010–2013) and according to age and sex [79, 83].

This then raises concerns that the ‘real benefits’ in fact are not benefits at all since they would never have achieved statistical validity in a RCT or if they did, may not have been of sufficient magnitude to warrant the added toxicity that invariably occurs. Keeping in mind the median OS benefit of CDF-approved indications was 3.1 months can we be sure that 1 month less than this would be statistically better or better enough to favourably tip the risks to benefits scale?

Discussion and policy recommendations

Because some argued that UK lagged behind other Western countries in delivering therapies to cancer patients and this could lead to disparity in outcomes, the CDF was established to ensure access to drugs available in other countries [84]. In this respect, the CDF has delivered its intended aims. However, we would argue from this analysis that the CDF has not provided meaningful value to cancer patients and wider society because the supporting data has been wanting.

The majority of CDF-approved indications have been based on studies that reported minimal to no benefit in survival. Other endorsements have relied on surrogate endpoints such as PFS that remain controversial given inherent flaws in trial design and the increasing abuse of censoring. The thresholds for meaningful clinical benefit proposed by ASCO or ESMO support our argument since the majority of CDF-approved indications were unable to meet these modest levels of efficacy (Table 1).

Patients would find many of the approved indications wanting as regards actual benefit, even before considering the burden of the associated toxicities [85]. Current evidence suggests the majority of cancer patients with a life expectancy ≤4 months prefer treatment that relieves pain and discomfort rather than extending life [86] and that they expect a minimum survival benefit of 3 months in this setting and potentially longer if the therapy is associated with more severe side effects [87, 88].

We must also consider the welfare loss to society from the CDF after expenditure of over one billion pounds [79]. An impact equality assessment of the CDF has been undertaken for patients receiving cancer drugs through the CDF in 2013/2014 (n =19 560)[79]. It reported that the potential benefit of the CDF to cancer patients, estimated at 3500 QALYS, has resulted in overall net harm to population health when one considers the health opportunity costs, with nearly 18 000 QALYS being displaced from patients elsewhere in the NHS [89, 90]. It is important therefore, to tread with caution when arguments are forwarded that all cancer drugs offering meaningful clinical benefit should be funded irrespective of price, without considering issues of value, distributive justice, and fairness. In the NHS, waiting times for diagnostic interventions and elective procedures continue to rise, many of which are directly affecting cancer patients [91].

At its inception, critics argued that the introduction of the CDF would reduce the negotiating power of the NHS, specifically the ability to negotiate fair prices of cancer drugs with pharmaceutical companies [81]. This is no more evident than when one considers the reversals of six indications delisted in January 2015 (see Table 3). None of the reinstated indications meet the criteria for clinical benefit according to the ESMO scale. However, negotiations were prompted by the threat of the drug being delisted, suggesting that the creation of a ring fenced access fund for cancer drugs provides a negative incentive for drug price negotiation. This is especially pertinent given recent evidence that the price of drugs is based on what the market will bear as opposed to the level of its clinical benefit [92]. Cabazitaxel, eribulin, and everolimus (for breast cancer) have all since been approved by NICE as a result of discounts being applied by pharmaceutical companies through the patient access scheme [93–95].

Table 3

Details of the six de-listed drugs, which were re-approved by the CDF following a second review in November 2015

Drug  Site  Indication  Author of index trial [REF]  PFS (HR)  OS (HR)  Approval on ASCO criteria  ESMO score  NICE status Jan 2015  CDF status Jan 2015  CDF status Nov 2015 
Cabazitaxel  Prostate  Metastatic CRPC previously treated with docetaxel  De bono 2010 [18 1.4 (0.7)  2.4 (0.7)  No  Not approved  Removed  Reinstated 
Eribulin  Breast  3rd line metastatic breast cancer  Cortes 2011 [27 1.5 (0.87)  2.5 (0.81)  No  Not approved  Removed  Reinstated 
Everolimus  Breast  Metastatic breast cancer in combination with exemestane  Baselga 2012 [28]/Piccart 2014 [29 4.6 (0.43)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Reinstated 
Everolimus  Renal  Metastatic RCC  Motzer 2010 [32 3 (0.33)  NS  No  Not approved  Removed  Reinstated 
Pemtrexed  Lung  Maintenance post 4 cycles cisplatin/pemetrexed for NSCLC  Ciuleanu 2009 [41 1.7 (0.5)  2.8 (0.79)  Yes  Not approved  Removed  Reinstated 
Regorafinib  Sarcoma (GIST)  Imatinib and sunitinib resistant GIST  Demetri 2013 [46 3.9 (0.27)  NR  No  Not appraised  Removed  Reinstated 

OS, overall survival (months); PFS, progression free survival (months); HR, median hazard ratio; ASCO, American Society of Clinical Oncology; ESMO, European Society of Medical Oncology; NR, not reported; NS, not statistically significant; NA, endpoint not assessed; CRC, colorectal cancer; RCC, renal cell cancer; CRPC, castrate resistant prostate cancer; GIST, gastrointestinal stromal tumour; NSCLC, non small cell lung cancer.

Given the evidence set forth, decisions regarding access appear politically motivated. The CDF was created following intense public and political pressure to provide access no matter what the cost or the evidence for their benefit. There was no stated estimation of the ‘number of lives that could be saved’, nor, more realistically, of the number of lives that may be extended. This was a debate played out in the media, limiting the role of NICE as the final arbiter for deciding what constitutes optimal value for society [82]. However, 6 years later, and after considerable expenditure we are now reverting to a pre-existing format, namely an independent health technology appraisal service (i.e. NICE) providing recommendations for NHS commissioning (see Figure 1).

Indeed, the evidence used by the CDF committee to re-appraise the value of drugs in January 2015 was in most cases available prior to the approval process, especially in circumstances where NICE had already undertaken an HTA appraisal. Of the 17 indications delisted in January 2015, 13 were for indications that were previously deemed not cost-effective by NICE (Table 1). A further seven indications were delisted in November 2015 of which five had been rejected following NICE appraisal. While these reversals may seem innocent, if a drug approved for an indication is subsequently deemed of insufficient value as data become available and its benefit is questioned we must acknowledge that it has then been given to patients who may have endured toxicity without any benefit.

Finally, while the stated goal of the CDF was to ‘empower clinicians, and to enable them to use the cancer drugs that they and their patients agree are needed to extend or improve life’, it is reasonable to ask why so many clearly ineffective drugs were prescribed in the first place. The issues are complex and cannot be answered without in-depth qualitative research. However, two factors may be important. The first is the so-called ‘moral hazard’. When patients and providers are shielded from the costs associated with an intervention (through insurance per se), they will be more willing to accept/deliver health care interventions even if the benefits are marginal [96]. Second, decision-making in the context of illness has been shown to be prone to biases resulting in an over-estimation of the level of risk of disease or potential benefits of treatment [97, 98].

Future options

One lesson from this costly saga is the need to strengthen regulatory and reimbursement processes and ensure they remain free from political interference. The use of clinically meaningful benefit thresholds such as that proposed by ASCO and ESMO seems enormously prudent. The ASCO metric in effect calls for minimum OS gains of 2.5–4.5 months or 25–50% gain over existing time scales and the ESMO threshold essentially prioritizes gains in survival (> 3 months with hazard ratios < 0.65), quality of life and reduction in toxicity compared with current standards of care.

We would suggest other countries considering a patient access scheme for drugs awaiting formal health technology appraisal use value frameworks that determine the likely benefit from reimbursement as part of the appraisal process. If drugs are made available pending an appraisal process, this should be accompanied by rigorous collection of outcome data through coverage with evidence development schemes. However, they should not replace assessment of the overall cost-effectiveness, which seeks to ascertain the societal benefit gained from drug reimbursements relative to other health technologies across the disease spectrum.

Improvements on the current system could also be achieved through new payment systems based on the attainment of pre-determined outcomes [99–101] or the introduction of value-based co-payments [102]. Another option would be to link HTA appraisal of the benefits and costs of new drugs with national rebate agreements [89]. The rebate would cover the difference between the manufacturers intended price of the drug and how much the NHS can afford to pay for its intended benefits. This would highlight to pharmaceutical companies of the price the NHS is willing to pay for the benefits offered by a new drug. Companies charging high prices for drugs with limited efficacy, would be expected to pay higher rebates. This would encourage research funders to support cancer clinical trials whose design and end points genuinely look for therapeutic advances that deliver meaningful clinical benefit rather than a low bar for response.

Conclusions

Despite significant expenditure, there remains no evidence that the CDF has delivered meaningful value to NHS cancer patients. We have analysed the value of CDF approved drugs according to six criteria including validated clinical benefit scales, and health technology appraisal from organizations such as NICE. From this, it is clear that the decision-making tools used by the CDF for prioritization of new drugs have failed given that a number of drugs were approved and subsequently delisted based on evidence that previously existed.

We recommend the avoidance of similar ‘ring-fenced’ drug access funds in other countries. The lack of empirical evidence that prioritizing drug expenditure (the greatest cancer care costs after inpatient care) will improve outcomes for cancer patients over and above greater investment in the whole cancer management pathway (screening, diagnostics, radiotherapy, surgery) and reducing access barriers (e.g. co-payments) argue against its widespread adoption. Ultimately, what is most important is that reimbursement decisions for all drugs, procedures and interventions within cancer care are made through appropriate health technology appraisal processes, which use the best available evidence to ensure decisions maximize value for cancer patients and society as a whole.

To view the original of this article, including ‘Reference Data’ CLICK HERE

Funding

None declared.

Disclosure

The authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com

Regards,
Greg_L-W.

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What Is Oesophageal Cancer

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Hi,

What Is Oesophageal Cancer

Oesophageal cancer starts in the food pipe, also known as your oesophagus or gullet – the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach.

Symptoms include difficulty swallowing, persistent acid indigestion, or heartburn, weight loss, pain in the throat or behind the breast bone, a chronic cough, hoarseness, coughing up blood, food coming back up and darker stools.

There are different types of oseophageal cancer, which vary dependant on what type of cell the cancer started in. These include adenocarcinoma, squamous cell cancer, undifferentiated cancers and other rare cancers such as melanoma, lymphoma and sarcomas.

Lifestyle factors – such as obesity, smoking and alchohol – cause 9 out of 10 oesophageal cancers.

Diet, age and other medical conditions can increase the risk too.

Treatment depends on where in the oesophagus the cancer is, how big it is, whether it has spread anywhere else in the body and general health.

Survival rates vary person to person as it depends on the individual condition, type of cancer, treatment and level of fitness.

To view the source of this article CLICK HERE

Regards,
Greg_L-W.

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#IN MEMORIAM: #Steve Hewlett 08-Aug-1958 – 20-Feb-2017 #Oesophageal-Cancer

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Hi,

Steve Hewlett, broadcaster and journalist, dies aged 58

Presenter of BBC Radio 4’s Media Show revealed last year he had been diagnosed with cancer of the oesophagus

Broadcaster and journalist Steve Hewlett has died from cancer at the age of 58. He had documented the impact of the disease in a series of candid radio interviews and newspaper articles.

The presenter of Radio 4’s Media Show revealed last year that he had been diagnosed with cancer of the oesophagus in March, and had spoken frankly about its development with Eddie Mair on Radio 4 and in a diary published in the Observer.

A fortnight ago, he had told Mair on the PM programme that doctors had decided to stop treatment and that he had married his long-term partner Rachel in hospital.

In a statement, Hewlett’s family said they had been “overwhelmed by the support of friends, colleagues and Radio 4 listeners”.

“The messages helped Steve enormously, especially over the last few months. The Royal Marsden have been amazing throughout the journey and we are indebted to all the wonderful staff there. We’d like to thank Eddie and all the PM listeners, and if people are still keen to help, then we’d like all donations to go towards the brilliant care the Marsden provide.”

The BBC said Hewlett had died on Monday morning while listening to Bob Dylan with his family at the Royal Marsden in London.

The BBC director general, Tony Hall, paid tribute to Hewlett as an “exceptional” journalist. He said: “His analysis of the media industry was always essential listening. Steve was a trusted voice that embodied everything positive in public service journalism. He was hugely popular not just with viewers and listeners, but with BBC staff.

“When I saw him last week, I told him how much I have admired his brave interviews with Eddie Mair about his treatment, which he did with a candour and sense of inquiry that was typically Steve. Our thoughts are with his family and many friends.”

Hewlett had presented the Media Show on Radio 4 since 2008 and was a media journalist and commentator, writing for Media Guardian for many years.

He was also editor of Panorama in the mid-1990s when the programme broadcast Martin Bashir’s interview with Princess Diana, which was watched by 23 million people.

A tribute to Hewlett’s work on The Media Show, of which he was the founding presenter, will be broadcast on Wednesday.

Hewlett’s openness about the impact of the cancer and its treatment had prompted a huge response from listeners, which Hewlett said had come as a surprise.

In an interview with the Observer, published earlier this month, Hewlett explained why he had decided to be so open about the last phase of his life: “I wanted to open myself up, to talk about what has been happening, but I didn’t imagine people would get as much from it as they have.

“Radio 4 talks a lot about having a relationship with its audience, how precious that is. This is the Radio 4 audience in top gear. That’s what it feels like to me.”

Asked by Mair on last Monday’s PM what he thought of the idea of “living each day as if it is your last” Hewlett said it meant he could relax and enjoy the time he had left.

“If you are told, literally ‘it’s any day’, I don’t know quite how you go about living every day as if it is your last. What do you do? Is this where you empty your bucket list? I literally don’t know what you do.”

“I think what you are looking for, what I am looking for, in that statement about living each day as if it is your last, is … it’s more kind of being able to relax, being able to enjoy, be able to watch the TV, be able to spend time with friends. That’s what I look towards, not to racing through a list of things.”

He also said he planned to celebrate Valentine’s Day with a proper wedding ring as the ring used in the ceremony was “a bit perfunctory”. When Mair chided him for sending his new wife out to “fix it”, Hewlett laughed: “Come on Eddie, there aren’t many up sides to this.”

Alex Graham, a TV producer and chair of the Scott Trust, the owner of the Guardian, who was a close friend of Hewlett’s for 35 years, said he was “utterly devastated” at his death.

He added: “I last saw him about a week ago. We talked for about three hours about everything and anything. And even though he was clearly in a lot of pain the whole conversation was shot through with his mischievous grizzly laugh.”

“I can’t believe that I’m now saying goodbye to him. He was a man of utmost integrity: fierce, honest and above all loyal. I’m very proud to have been his friend.”

Part of interview with Eddie Mair on Radio 4’s PM programme: 6 February 2017

Steve Hewlett: “So my kids are there, and the person who is going to be my wife is there, and the person who has been the closest thing I’ve had to a wife is there, and [Dr] Noreen takes me aside and says ‘if you are going to do this marriage thing you better do it now’.

“The hospital, extraordinarily whipped into shape by the amazing Noreen, and the whole thing is organised in an hour. I can’t tell, you. They managed to get a Chelsea registrar, a Chelsea vicar, they got someone else to come out and bless the rings, I’ve no idea who that was, we just happened to have rings … “

Eddie Mair: “What kept you Steve? What stopped you from doing this before?”

SH: “It was all moving along at a reasonably slow pace. And then of course the cancer happened and everything’s up in the air, so what do you do? There’s this wedding scene in this very room.”

EM: “Right where we are. Right at the end of the ward.”

SH: “The staff produced a wedding cake, the wife of the gent sitting next door offered Rachel some help with some cosmetics. The nurses managed to produce bunches of flowers, wedding cake, a couple of bottles appear from God knows where. And then this ceremony begins. And it was like a combination of all gas and gaiters and the vicar of Dibley, really.

“The idea that Britain doesn’t have people in it who really care about other people and will really go the extra mile when it matters is such nonsense. This little room here, this is Britain at its best.

“This is probably the quickest wedding, and the cheapest weeding that’s ever been held on these four isles.”

EM: “Can you remember what you said? What were your vows?”

SH: “Not a bit of it.”

EM: “Are you sure this happened?”

SH: “There are pictures … this extraordinary event, it was arranged in no time at all.”

EM: “Did you cry?”

SH: “Of course I cried. I can’t quite remember why I cried … no that’s not true.”

To view the original article CLICK HERE

For details of Oesophageal Cancer CLICK HERE
 

Regards,
Greg_L-W.

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~
Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins
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  9. I Regret due to BT in this area I have a rubbish Broadband connection
  10. I AM opposed to British membership of The EU
  11. I AM opposed to Welsh, Scottish or English Independence within an interdependent UK
  12. I am NOT a WARMIST
  13. I do NOT believe the IPCC Climate Propaganda re Anthropogenic Global Warming
  14. I AM strongly opposed to the subsidy or use of failed technologies eg. WIND TURBINES
  15. I AM IN FAVOUR of rapid research & development of NEW NUCLEAR technologies
  16. I see no evidence to trust POLITICIANS at any level or of any persuasion
  17. I do NOT believe in GODS singular or plural, Bronze Age or Modern
  18. I value the NHS as a HEALTH SERVICE NOT a Lifestyle support
  19. I believe in a DEATH PENALTY for serial or GBH rape.
  20. I believe in a DEATH PENALTY for serial, terrorist, mass or for pleasure murder.
  21. I believe in a DEATH PENALTY for serial gross child abuse including sexual.
  22. I do NOT trust or believe in armed police
  23. I do NOT believe in prolonging human life beyond reasonable expectation of sentient participatory intellectual existence
  24. I believe in EUTHENASIA under clearly defined & legal terms
  25. I try to make every effort to NOT infringe copyrights in any commercial way & make all corrections of fact brought to my attention by an identifiable individual

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~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

Rucaparib (Rubraca) for ovarian cancer …

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~
Rucaparib (Rubraca) for ovarian cancer …
~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

Posted by:
Greg Lance – Watkins
Greg_L-W

eMail: Greg_L-W@BTconnect.com

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

Hi,

Genetic outfit at work: Rucaparib (Rubraca) for ovarian cancer with deleterious BRCA mutation(s)

Posted on February 1, 2017
ovarian-cancer-02
February 01, 2017 – This is an announcement by the American Food & Drug Administration (FDA) who announced on December 19, 2016, that it granted accelerated approval to Rucaparib (Rubraca) to treat women with a certain type of ovarian cancer. Rucaparib (Rubraca) was approved for women with advanced ovarian cancer who have been treated with two or more chemotherapies and whose tumors have a specific gene mutation (deleterious BRCA) as identified by an FDA-approved companion diagnostic test.

genetic-mutation-01

Genetic Mutations Could Predict Patients Likely to Benefit from New Class of Cancer Drugs

“This approval is another example of the trend we are seeing in developing targeted agents to treat cancers caused by specific mutations in a patient’s genes,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and acting director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence. “Women with these gene abnormalities who have tried at least two chemotherapy treatments for their ovarian cancer now have an additional treatment option.”The National Cancer Institute estimates that 22,280 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2016 and an estimated 14,240 will die of this disease. Approximately 15 to 20 percent of patients with ovarian cancer have a BRCA gene mutation.BRCA genes are involved with repairing damaged DNA and normally work to prevent tumor development. However, mutations of these genes may lead to certain cancers, including ovarian cancers. Rucaparib (Rubraca) is a poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor that blocks an enzyme involved in repairing damaged DNA. By blocking this enzyme, DNA inside the cancerous cells with damaged BRCA genes may be less likely to be repaired, leading to cell death and possibly a slow-down or stoppage of tumor growth.The FDA also approved the FoundationFocus CDxBRCA companion diagnostic for use with Rucaparib (Rubraca), which is the first next-generation-sequencing (NGS)-based companion diagnostic approved by the agency. The NGS test detects the presence of deleterious BRCA gene mutations in the tumor tissue of ovarian cancer patients. If one or more of the mutations are detected, the patient may be eligible for treatment with Rucaparib (Rubraca).The efficacy of Rucaparib (Rubraca) was studied in two, single-arm clinical trials involving 106 participants with BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer who had been treated with two or more chemotherapy regimens. BRCA gene mutations were confirmed in 96 percent of tested trial participants with available tumor tissue using the FoundationFocus CDxBRCA companion diagnostic. The trials measured the percentage of participants who experienced complete or partial shrinkage of their tumors (overall response rate). Fifty-four percent of the participants who received Rucaparib (Rubraca) in the trials experienced complete or partial shrinkage of their tumors lasting a median of 9.2 months.In contrast to its efficacy, the safety profile of Rucaparib (Rubraca) is not without problems, however. Common side effects of Rucaparib (Rubraca) include nausea, fatigue, vomiting, low levels of red blood cells (anemia), abdominal pain, unusual taste sensation (dysgeusia), constipation, decreased appetite, diarrhea, low levels of blood platelets (thrombocytopenia) and trouble breathing (dyspnea). Rucaparib (Rubraca) is associated with serious risks, such as bone marrow problems (myelodysplastic syndrome), a type of cancer of the blood called acute myeloid leukemia and fetal harm.The agency approved Rucaparib (Rubraca) under its accelerated approval program, which allows approval of a drug to treat a serious or life-threatening disease or condition based on clinical data showing the drug has an effect on a surrogate (substitute) endpoint that is reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit. The sponsor is continuing to study this drug in patients with advanced ovarian cancer who have BRCA gene mutations and in patients with other types of ovarian cancer. The FDA also granted the Rucaparib (Rubraca) application breakthrough therapy designation and priority review status. Rucaparib (Rubraca) also received orphan drug designation, which provides incentives such as tax credits, user fee waivers and eligibility for exclusivity to assist and encourage the development of drugs intended to treat rare diseases.

To view the original of this article CLICK HERE
For more information on Rubraca CLICK HERE

Regards,
Greg_L-W.

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~
Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins
tel: 44 (0)1594 – 528 337
Calls from ‘Number Withheld’ phones Are Blocked

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  7. I ONLY GUARANTEE to phone back identifiable UK Land Line Messages
  8. I do NOT accept phone calls from witheld numbers
  9. I Regret due to BT in this area I have a rubbish Broadband connection
  10. I AM opposed to British membership of The EU
  11. I AM opposed to Welsh, Scottish or English Independence within an interdependent UK
  12. I am NOT a WARMIST
  13. I do NOT believe the IPCC Climate Propaganda re Anthropogenic Global Warming
  14. I AM strongly opposed to the subsidy or use of failed technologies eg. WIND TURBINES
  15. I AM IN FAVOUR of rapid research & development of NEW NUCLEAR technologies
  16. I see no evidence to trust POLITICIANS at any level or of any persuasion
  17. I do NOT believe in GODS singular or plural, Bronze Age or Modern
  18. I value the NHS as a HEALTH SERVICE NOT a Lifestyle support
  19. I believe in a DEATH PENALTY for serial or GBH rape.
  20. I believe in a DEATH PENALTY for serial, terrorist, mass or for pleasure murder.
  21. I believe in a DEATH PENALTY for serial gross child abuse including sexual.
  22. I do NOT trust or believe in armed police
  23. I do NOT believe in prolonging human life beyond reasonable expectation of sentient participatory intellectual existence
  24. I believe in EUTHENASIA under clearly defined & legal terms
  25. I try to make every effort to NOT infringe copyrights in any commercial way & make all corrections of fact brought to my attention by an identifiable individual

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~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

Cervical Cancer Can Be A Death Sentence Under 25 On The NHS …

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~
Cervical Cancer Can Be A Death Sentence Under 25 On The NHS …
~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

Posted by:
Greg Lance – Watkins
Greg_L-W

eMail: Greg_L-W@BTconnect.com

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

Hi,

Lets not forget the bravery of Jade Goody (5 June 1981 – 22 March 2009) and how she made her fight against cervical cancer so very public right up until the day she died 8 years ago.

Jade Goody not only fought for survival, you will remember she had two little boys, but she fought for recognition of cervical cancer and the need for much younger women to be screened – the problem then was that women under 25 found it all but impossible to have screening, and Doctors seemed woefully ignorant of the risks for younger women.

Seems like little has changed and her efforts were ignored, once the media had no more mawkish picture stories to capitalise on!

Today I received the letter below – as cervical cancer killed yet another young woman because she couldn’t get screening under 25!

I am sure that you can help, either by seeking out petitions to sign or probably more valuably if you write to your political representatives and petition them yourself, on a regular basis, after all it could be your daughter, sister, girl friend or young wife who is condemned to death because she couldn’t get screening under 25!

If you are a young woman under 25 it could be you!

WHY NOT:
Print out this posting and provide the url sending it with a brief covering note to your MP, Regional Assembly Member and County Councillor – on a regular basis until the NHS law is changed to save young women too!

Just over 2 women die each day of cervical cancer. To be fair to the NHS most of those are in the 60+ age group. However surely teenage girls and young women under 25 should have automatic access to smear tests if they present with any of the symptoms of cervical cancer.

Is it the fact that cervical cancer cases are more prevalent in poorer areas that means it is neglected amongst young women? Do help campaign for a better response to early cervical cancer and help save these young women neglected by the system.

Greg,

My little sister Amber passed away last month after a long battle with cancer. She was only 25. 

She was worried when she started to get symptoms associated with cervical cancer – that was seven years ago. She asked her doctor for a smear test at least 10 times, but every time she was refused. Women in the UK aren’t offered cervical screenings until they turn 25. If my sister had been given what she asked for all those years ago, she might still be here now. 

I want Amber’s death to mean something. That’s why I am campaigning for Amber’s Law: an amendment that would let women under 25 get cervical cancer screening if they ask for it.

In the end Amber had to pay for a private screening in order to get diagnosed – but by then it was too late. She put up a good fight but the cancer had spread everywhere: her lymph nodes, her lungs and her throat. 

Currently women under 25 aren’t screened – the government say lowering the legal age of compulsory screening wouldn’t be productive and women under 25 rarely get this disease. But Amber’s story proves that some young women do get cervical cancer. I don’t think smear tests need to be mandatory for everyone, but if a woman asks her doctor for the test she shouldn’t be ignored. 

Amber was such a fighter. In her last week, when she was admitted to hospital for breathing difficulties, she fought off the paramedics to go upstairs and grab her makeup bag. She was determined keep fighting, she didn’t believe in giving up. Now she’s gone, I am going to be more like Amber and fight to raise her voice.

From
Josh Cliff

Josh Cliff set out to Petition the Government.

Make the cervical screening option available from 18 to high risk groups

The current age for cervical cancer screening in England is 25. If you are under 25 you aren’t allowed to have a screening due to the NHS guidelines, some Gps will send women under 25 for a smear if they have certain symptoms yet some won’t. This is why #Amberslaw needs to come in place. This means there would be a guideline through the NHS which allows ALL gps in any area of the U.K. To send people for smears under 25 if they have symptoms which are classed as alarming or high risk. 

Ambers Law

Any woman under the age of 25 who is not eligible for cervical cancer screening who goes to the doctors with any kind of problems in their lower half on 2 occasions will have the OPTION to have screening.

Amber went to the doctors multiple (I’m talking over 10 at least) times over the course of a few years and was constantly told ‘it’s your hormones’ ‘it’s a water infection’ ‘it’s your pill’ and when she asked for a screening they said no she was too young. We paid for her to get one private at the age of 21 and found she had cervical cancer that had been there for 2-4 years already. This over the course of 4 years spread to her lungs and her throat. Amber died at the age of 25, we lost a sister, daughter, grand daughter and an amazing friend to cancer because she was failed by the people who were meant to provide her care.

How would you feel if it was your sister or daughter? If you know deep down they could of been saved and still here today if they had the option for a screening at any age?

#AmberslawThere has been a couple of petitions been archived with no valid reason. Why not just lower the age? Why cant you help save young women?

Keeley McCormick started this petition with a single signature, and now has 201,319 supporters. Start a petition today to change something you care about.

Regards,
Greg_L-W.

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~
Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins
tel: 44 (0)1594 – 528 337
Calls from ‘Number Withheld’ phones Are Blocked

All unanswered messages are recorded.
Leave your name & a UK land line number & I will return your call.

‘e’Mail Address: Greg_L-W@BTconnect.com

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Health Blog.: CLICK HERE
Chepstow Chat: CLICK HERE
Christopher Story: CLICK HERE
Des Watkins DFC; CdeG: CLICK HERE/
Hollie Greig etc.: CLICK HERE
Psycheocracy: CLICK HERE
The McCann Case: CLICK HERE
The Speculative Society of Edinburgh: CLICK HERE
Stolen Kids, Dunblane: CLICK HERE
Stolen Kids, Bloggers: CLICK HERE
Views I respect & almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
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Skype: GregL-W

TWITTER: @Greg_LW

Stolen Kids Blogs with links:
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NB:
  1. I NEVER post anonymously on the internet
  2. ALL MY BLOGS & WEB SITES are clearly sourced to me
  3. I do NOT use an obfuscated eMail address to hide behind
  4. I do NOT use or bother reading FaceBook
  5. I DO have a Voice Mail Message System
  6. I ONLY GUARANTEE to answer identifiable eMails
  7. I ONLY GUARANTEE to phone back identifiable UK Land Line Messages
  8. I do NOT accept phone calls from witheld numbers
  9. I Regret due to BT in this area I have a rubbish Broadband connection
  10. I AM opposed to British membership of The EU
  11. I AM opposed to Welsh, Scottish or English Independence within an interdependent UK
  12. I am NOT a WARMIST
  13. I do NOT believe the IPCC Climate Propaganda re Anthropogenic Global Warming
  14. I AM strongly opposed to the subsidy or use of failed technologies eg. WIND TURBINES
  15. I AM IN FAVOUR of rapid research & development of NEW NUCLEAR technologies
  16. I see no evidence to trust POLITICIANS at any level or of any persuasion
  17. I do NOT believe in GODS singular or plural, Bronze Age or Modern
  18. I value the NHS as a HEALTH SERVICE NOT a Lifestyle support
  19. I believe in a DEATH PENALTY for serial or GBH rape.
  20. I believe in a DEATH PENALTY for serial, terrorist, mass or for pleasure murder.
  21. I believe in a DEATH PENALTY for serial gross child abuse including sexual.
  22. I do NOT trust or believe in armed police
  23. I do NOT believe in prolonging human life beyond reasonable expectation of sentient participatory intellectual existence
  24. I believe in EUTHENASIA under clearly defined & legal terms
  25. I try to make every effort to NOT infringe copyrights in any commercial way & make all corrections of fact brought to my attention by an identifiable individual

Please Be Sure To
.Follow Greg_LW on Twitter.

Re-TWEET my Twitterings

& Publicise My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide
~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

SEPSIS: The Stats, The Signs & Should be Treated ‘Like A Heart Attack’ …

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~
SEPSIS: The Stats, The Signs & Should be Treated ‘Like A Heart Attack‘ …
~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

Posted by:
Greg Lance – Watkins
Greg_L-W

eMail: Greg_L-W@BTconnect.com

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

Hi,

did you know that although someone dies of cancer or heart disease about every 4 or 5 minutes in the UK. Although little heard of, someone dies of Sepsis about every 15 minutes, thats over 100 people a day who die of Sepsis!

Sepsis costs the NHS around £2,500,000 a day to treat or about £2 Billion a year!

The UK SEPSIS TRUST claims:

Every year in the UK there are 150,000 cases of Sepsis, resulting in a staggering 44,000 deaths – more than bowel, breast and prostate cancer combined.

UK incidence/ mortality data for SEPSIS
and comparators

37,000 annual deaths are derived from an extrapolated dataset provided to the UK Sepsis Trust by the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre (ICNARC) in 2006. The mortality rate for patients admitted to Critical Care with sepsis remains just under 35%, although this has fallen from 40% over the last 10 years.

102,000 cases seen annually in the UK comes from a conservative estimate of incidence derived from studies in other developed countries, including in Finland (Karlsson et al 2007), Spain (Blanco et al 2008) and Europe (Davies et al 2001). More recent estimates, including data to be published by the UK’s Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) and from Scandanavia (Henrikson et al 2015) and the U.S (Hall et al 2011), places the estimate closer to 200,000 cases per year with 60,000 deaths.

Costs

That each case of sepsis costs a healthcare system in a developed country €25,000 is derived from the European SOAP study (Vincent et al 2006): equating to about £2 billion annually for the UK.

COMPARE WITH Cardio Vascular Disease in the UK:

cvd-uk-stats-01

COMPARE with Cancer:

cancer-uk-stats-01

We hear constantly about the dangers of Heart Attacks and cancer but how often do we hear about Sepsis?

SEPSIS WARNING SIGNS

Sepsis, also referred to as blood poisoning or septicaemia, is a potentially life-threatening condition, triggered by an infection or injury.

In sepsis, the body’s immune system goes into overdrive as it tries to fight an infection.

This can reduce the blood supply to vital organs such as the brain, heart and kidneys.

Without quick treatment, sepsis can lead to multiple organ failure and death. 

Early symptoms of sepsis may include:

  • a high temperature (fever) or low body temperature
  • chills and shivering
  • a fast heartbeat
  • fast breathing

In some cases, symptoms of more severe sepsis or septic shock (when your blood pressure drops to a dangerously low level) develop soon after. These can include:

  • feeling dizzy or faint
  • a change in mental state, such as confusion or disorientation
  • diarrhoea
  • nausea and vomiting
  • slurred speech
  • severe muscle pain
  • severe breathlessness
  • less urine production than normal (for example, not urinating for a day)
  • cold, clammy and pale or mottled skin
  • loss of consciousness

Severe sepsis and septic shock are medical emergencies. If you think that you or someone in your care has one of these conditions, call 999 and ask for an ambulance.

Source: NHS Choices  

To DOWNLOAD a Poster

for your Office, School, Notice Board, Club. Work or for a friend just CLICK HERE

Treat sepsis ‘the same as heart attacks’

To read more CLICK HERE

To GO TO The UK SEPSIS TRUST Home Page CLICK HERE

Regards,
Greg_L-W.

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~
Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins
tel: 44 (0)1594 – 528 337
Calls from ‘Number Withheld’ phones Are Blocked

All unanswered messages are recorded.
Leave your name & a UK land line number & I will return your call.

‘e’Mail Address: Greg_L-W@BTconnect.com

DO MAKE USE of LINKS,
>SEARCH<
&
>Side Bars<
&
The Top Bar >PAGES<

Also:

ABOUT ME, Details & Links: CLICK HERE
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE 
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE 
Summary & archive, facts & comments on Ukip: http://Ukip-vs-EUkip.com
General ‘Stuff’: http://GL-W.com
Leave-The-EU Referendum & BreXit Process CLICK HERE
Documents, Essays & Treaties: CLICK HERE
The Hamlet of Stroat: CLICK HERE
Data & The Study of a Wind Turbine Application: CLICK HERE
Health Blog.: CLICK HERE
Chepstow Chat: CLICK HERE
Christopher Story: CLICK HERE
Des Watkins DFC; CdeG: CLICK HERE/
Hollie Greig etc.: CLICK HERE
Psycheocracy: CLICK HERE
The McCann Case: CLICK HERE
The Speculative Society of Edinburgh: CLICK HERE
Stolen Kids, Dunblane: CLICK HERE
Stolen Kids, Bloggers: CLICK HERE
Views I respect & almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
A Concept of Governance Worthy of Developement: CLICK HERE

Skype: GregL-W

TWITTER: @Greg_LW

Stolen Kids Blogs with links:
http://StolenKids-Bloggers.Blogspot.com
Stolen Oyster with links:
http://StolenOyster-Bloggers.Blogspot.com
Stolen Trust with links:
http://StolenTrust-Bloggers.Blogspot.com
Stolen Childhood with links:
http://StolenChildhood-Bloggers.Blogspot.com
NB:
  1. I NEVER post anonymously on the internet
  2. ALL MY BLOGS & WEB SITES are clearly sourced to me
  3. I do NOT use an obfuscated eMail address to hide behind
  4. I do NOT use or bother reading FaceBook
  5. I DO have a Voice Mail Message System
  6. I ONLY GUARANTEE to answer identifiable eMails
  7. I ONLY GUARANTEE to phone back identifiable UK Land Line Messages
  8. I do NOT accept phone calls from witheld numbers
  9. I Regret due to BT in this area I have a rubbish Broadband connection
  10. I AM opposed to British membership of The EU
  11. I AM opposed to Welsh, Scottish or English Independence within an interdependent UK
  12. I am NOT a WARMIST
  13. I do NOT believe the IPCC Climate Propaganda re Anthropogenic Global Warming
  14. I AM strongly opposed to the subsidy or use of failed technologies eg. WIND TURBINES
  15. I AM IN FAVOUR of rapid research & development of NEW NUCLEAR technologies
  16. I see no evidence to trust POLITICIANS at any level or of any persuasion
  17. I do NOT believe in GODS singular or plural, Bronze Age or Modern
  18. I value the NHS as a HEALTH SERVICE NOT a Lifestyle support
  19. I believe in a DEATH PENALTY for serial or GBH rape.
  20. I believe in a DEATH PENALTY for serial, terrorist, mass or for pleasure murder.
  21. I believe in a DEATH PENALTY for serial gross child abuse including sexual.
  22. I do NOT trust or believe in armed police
  23. I do NOT believe in prolonging human life beyond reasonable expectation of sentient participatory intellectual existence
  24. I believe in EUTHENASIA under clearly defined & legal terms
  25. I try to make every effort to NOT infringe copyrights in any commercial way & make all corrections of fact brought to my attention by an identifiable individual

Please Be Sure To
.Follow Greg_LW on Twitter.

Re-TWEET my Twitterings

& Publicise My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide
~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

US Fund Managers Betting Against Trump On Obamacare …

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~
US Fund Managers Betting Against Trump On Obamacare …
~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

Posted by:
Greg Lance – Watkins
Greg_L-W

eMail: Greg_L-W@BTconnect.com

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

Hi,

U.S. fund managers betting Trump fails to rewrite Obamacare

By David Randall | NEW YORK

Some prominent U.S. fund managers are betting that former President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare law will not undergo the widespread changes that President Donald Trump promised on the campaign trail.

Portfolio managers from Fidelity, Gamco, Thornburg and other large firms say they see the broad outlines of the Affordable Care Act – commonly known as Obamacare – remaining intact despite Trump’s signing of an executive order on Friday, his first day in office, that sought to weaken it.

As a result, these fund managers say they are buying shares of hospitals, health insurance companies and biotech firms they see as unfairly hit by political uncertainty.

“They may do enough to try to rebrand it as Trumpcare, but I just don’t think it will be that dramatically different from what we have today,” said Jeff Jonas, a portfolio manager at Gamco Investors in Rye, New York, who said he has been adding to his position in hospital and nursing center company Kindred Healthcare Inc and large health insurance companies.

“The executive order itself was very vague, and it’s a little hard to say at this point what actual effect it will have,” he said.

Trump’s order directs government departments to “waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay the implementation” of provisions of the law that imposed fiscal burdens on states, companies or individuals, but provides no details.

HOSPITAL STOCKS GAINING

Investors overall still look hesitant to buy healthcare stocks, with fund flows to the iShares US Healthcare ETF, a widely held exchange traded fund that tracks the healthcare industry, falling 4.8 percent in the week ending Jan. 11, according to Lipper data.

Healthcare stocks fell swiftly after Trump was elected on Nov. 8, and have underperformed since. The S&P 500 healthcare sector has gained 2 percent since Election Day, compared with a 6.3 percent rise in the S&P 500 over the same time.

But hospital stocks such as HCA Holdings Inc have outperformed since the start of January on signs that Republicans plan to replace the Affordable Care Act at the same time they repeal it. Shares of HCA are up 7.9 percent since the start of the year, compared with a 1.2 percent gain in the S&P 500, and are trading slightly higher than they were on Election Day.

Although repealing the law requires only a majority in the Senate, replacing it would require at least 60 votes in the Senate, meaning that Republicans would have to win some Democratic support. As a result, fund managers said they expect only incremental changes.

A repeal without a replacement could put pressure on hospitals by rescinding the Medicaid expansion and individual subsidies, prompting more individuals to go without insurance and be unable to pay their hospital bills.

Representative Tom Price, Trump’s nominee for health secretary, said in a hearing Wednesday that the administration will initially focus on individual health plans sold on exchanges and is not interested in “pulling the rug out on anybody,” though he said it would also focus on Medicaid.

Some Republicans in Congress have been pushing for an outright repeal in order to give states more control of their healthcare programs. The House and Senate passed resolutions to have draft legislation that would repeal the law ready by Jan. 27. Other Republican senators have proposed that states have the option remain in the Obamacare insurance program.

NOT “A WHOLE LOT OF DISRUPTION”

Eddie Yoon, portfolio manager of the $6.1 billion Fidelity Select Heath Care fund in Boston, has not changed his holdings since the election because he does not see large changes coming.

He said he remains bullish on the medical device and biotech industries because both do not look like they would be significantly affected by any of the Republican healthcare proposals. He expects the moratorium on a tax on medical device sales, due to expire at the end of 2017, will be extended, and that controls on drug prices floated by Trump are unlikely to be enacted.

“I don’t think the new administration wants to get bogged down in healthcare and they want to move on to immigration and tax reform and bigger policy items,” said Yoon. “I don’t anticipate that there will be a whole lot of disruption.”

Biotech may also benefit if Congress passes legislation that cuts the taxes companies pay on profits earned overseas, leaving pharmaceutical companies flush and ushering in a wave of mergers and acquisitions, he said.

The Nasdaq Biotechnlogy Index is up 3.8 percent since the beginning of the year after falling more than 20 percent last year.

Connor Browne, a portfolio manager with the $889 million Thornburg Value fund in Santa Fe, New Mexico, said he added a position in biotech company Seattle Genetics Inc in late December. He also has been adding to his position in medical device makers in anticipation that little will be done to change the law, meaning that millions of Americans will still have insurance that will help pay for devices.

“While it hasn’t so far paid to underestimate Donald Trump, it sure seems like we might be seeing indications that he doesn’t understand how hard it will be to get legislation done,” Browne said.

To view the original of this article CLICK HERE

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