#Statins – The Pros & Cons are readily Available I Suggest Your Doctor Decides But Here Are Some Facts …

DO MAKE USE of LINKS,
>SEARCH<
&
>Side Bars<
&
The Top Bar >PAGES<

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

.
#Statins – The Pros & Cons are readily Available I Suggest Your Doctor Decides But Here Are Some Facts …
.
~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

Posted by:
Greg Lance – Watkins
Greg_L-W

eMail:
Greg_L-W@BTconnect.com

The BLOG:
https://InfoWebSiteUK.wordpress.com

The Main Web Site:
www.InfoWebSite.UK

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

.

 .

Hi,

here are a few informed and responsible articles regarding Statins – I do not presume to advise as I feel this is a decision you must make led by your Consultant and/or Doctor.

Suffice to say my medics have managed to keep me alive for 20 years of cancer and since my major Heart Attack 19-Nov-2012 and I take my prescribed drugs regularly including 80mg Atorvastatin, 5mg Bisoprolol LA25 of Elantan, 1.25mg Ramipril & 75mg of dispersable Asprin each day!

 JUST CLICK on the titles below for more information:
Personal Health

Weighing the Pros and Cons of Statins

By JANE E. BRODY

Statins are often given to healthy people to prevent a potentially devastating problem, so some patients object to taking them.

The New Old Age

You’re Over 75, and You’re Healthy. Why Are You Taking a Statin?

By PAULA SPAN

It’s not clear that statins prevent first heart attacks and strokes in older patients, and the drugs do have side effects that can be harmful.

Are Statin Side Effects ‘All in Our Heads’?

By NICHOLAS BAKALAR

Muscle pain and other common side effects of statins may be influenced by psychological factors.

Having Heart Surgery? Don’t Stop Your Statins

By NICHOLAS BAKALAR

Patients who continued to take the cholesterol-lowering drugs on the day of surgery had a 48 percent reduced risk of dying in the next 30 days.

Well

Can Statins Cause Diabetes?

By RONI CARYN RABIN

Numerous studies have shown that cholesterol-lowering statin drugs are linked to a small increase in the risk of Type 2 diabetes, even as they reduce the risk of heart attacks.

.
Regards,
     Greg_L-W
Greg Lance-Watkins
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving my wife Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.

If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings. . Later in the sequence of my experiences with cancer you will note that I introduce some results and events most probably linked with cancer such as enlarged & damaged Prostate and a consequential Heart Attack leaving me with no right coronary artery! . I have also included numerous articles and anecdotes regarding health – primarily related to cancer, prostate and heart conditions – FYI! . Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar. . You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help you in ANY way. .

Regards,
Greg_L-W.

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~
.
Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins
tel: 44 (0)1594 – 528 337
Calls from ‘Number Withheld’ phones Are Blocked

All unanswered messages are recorded.
Leave your name & a UK land line number & I will return your call.

‘e’Mail Address: Greg_L-W@BTconnect.com

Skype: GregL-W

TWITTER: @Greg_LW

DO MAKE USE of LINKS,
>SEARCH<
&
>Side Bars<
&
The Top Bar >PAGES<
I try to make every effort to NOT infringe copyrights in any commercial way & make all corrections of fact brought to my attention by an identifiable individual
.

Please Be Sure To
.Follow Greg_LW on Twitter.

Re-TWEET my Twitterings
https://twitter.com/Greg_LW

& Publicise

My MainWebSite & Blogs

To Spread The Facts World Wide


eMail:
Greg_L-W@BTconnect.com

The BLOG:
https://InfoWebSiteUK.wordpress.com

The Main Web Site:
www.InfoWebSite.UK

~~~~~~~~~~#########~~~~~~~~~~

Enhanced by Zemanta

Putting Stents To The Test & Treating Heart Attacks

Putting Stents To The Test & Treating Heart Attacks
.

 Please Be Sure To

& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide

To Give Hope & Information

 .
 

Photo

 
A cardiologist showing the blocked arteries of a patient who had a right and left catheterization procedure at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden, N.J. Credit Mark Makela for The New York Times

Millions of Americans have had stents — small wire cages — inserted in their coronary arteries to prop them open. And many are convinced the devices are protecting them from heart attacks. After all, a partly blocked artery is now cleared, and the pain in a heart muscle starved of blood often vanishes once the artery is open again.

But while stents unquestionably save lives of patients in the throes of a heart attack or a threatened heart attack, there is no convincing evidence that stents reduce heart attack risk for people suffering from the chest pains known as stable angina. These are people who feel tightness or discomfort walking up a hill, for example, because a partly blocked coronary artery is depriving their heart of blood. But the pain or tightness goes away if they stop and rest or just stay still. And there is a reasonable argument that drugs — cholesterol-lowering statins in particular — might be just as good at reducing such pain.

“It is kind of amazing that we don’t have the evidence,” said Dr. David J. Maron, the director of preventive cardiology at Stanford.

Photo

 
Dr. David J. Maron, the director of preventive cardiology at Stanford, examining angiograms. Credit Peter Earl McCollough for The New York Times

Now, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute is trying to find out whether stents do in fact prevent heart attacks. The answer could change the standard of care for the more than half a million Americans annually who receive a new diagnosis of heart disease after they see a doctor for angina. Heart disease remains the biggest killer of Americans despite significant treatment advances in the past decade.

The typical treatment for angina is to thread a narrow catheter up from a blood vessel in the groin to the heart, squirt in a dye that allows a cardiologist to see blockages in arteries on X-rays, and then insert a stent in the blocked areas. Stents are safe but expensive. Medicare payments vary depending on what kind of stent is used and how many, but are generally above $10,000 and can be more than $17,000.

And stents are not always a permanent solution to chest pain, as Albert Nassar of Brooklyn discovered. When he had angina four years ago, the reason seemed clear and the solution straightforward. An angiogram — the test in which dye is injected into the coronary arteries — showed one was 90 percent blocked. When a doctor inserted a stent to open that artery, the pain vanished.

But three years later, Mr. Nassar, 59, again felt tightness in his chest as he rode a recumbent bike at the gym. He said he expected another stent, but his cardiologist surprised him. He told Mr. Nassar that the medical profession does not actually know if stents help people like him with moderate to severely blocked coronary arteries.

Then he asked Mr. Nassar if he would be part of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute clinical trial, known as Ischemia, and have his treatment decided randomly between two options. If he was assigned to one group, his doctors would look at his blocked artery with X-rays and open it mechanically with a stent or, if the X-rays showed he was among the minority whose blockage could not be opened with a stent, with bypass surgery. He would also be asked to take drugs and change his lifestyle to protect his heart. In the other, his treatment would consist solely of drugs and the lifestyle changes. There would be no peeking at his blockage.

Mr. Nassar leapt at the chance and when he was assigned to take the drugs — a statin, blood pressure drugs and an aspirin — he was delighted.

“I didn’t feel the urge to have another surgical procedure,” he said. “I’ve had enough of those.”

The idea that opening blocked arteries saves lives dates to the 1970s and ’80s. In those decades, neither stents nor statins were used. The only treatment for blocked arteries was bypass surgery, a major operation in which the ribs are split open and a patient is put on a heart-lung machine while the heart is stopped. A surgeon bypasses the blockage with a blood vessel taken from elsewhere in the body.

Studies at the time had found that surgery was better for patients with severe blockages of major coronary arteries than not having surgery.

Stents were introduced in the 1990s, and because they relieved pain and were far less invasive than bypass surgery, they became the treatment of choice. Doctors and patients started to believe they also saved lives in stable patients, though there was no solid evidence of that.

“The thought was, better to go in and open it up,” said Dr. Harmony R. Reynolds, a cardiologist at NYU Langone Medical Center and a principal investigator in the study that Mr. Nassar joined. “But now meds have gotten so good that it is not clear surgery adds anything for stable patients.”

Researchers tried to get an answer with a big federal study, called Courage, that was published in 2007. But many cardiologists said the study was flawed and they did not believe its conclusion that stents failed to prevent heart attacks and deaths.

In Courage, as in the new study, participants were given stents and intensive drug therapy —– a statin, blood pressure drugs and aspirin — or just the medicines. The criticism, though, was that doctors may have cherry-picked patients, excluding the sickest. Because angiograms revealed blockages in arteries before patients were invited to enroll in the trial, doctors who believed stents were lifesaving may never have asked patients with the most severe disease to join the study.

The result, skeptics said, was that most patients in the study were at such low risk that it did not matter which treatment they received. They were certain to do well, so the study proved nothing about whether stents worked.

Because of the doubts about that study and ingrained habits, medical practice was largely unchanged by its findings. A recent study, which analyzed recorded conversations between cardiologists and patients with stable angina, found that 75 percent of the cardiologists recommended stents and when they did, their patients almost always complied. And, the study found, on the rare occasions when the cardiologists presented both stents and medical treatment as options, none of the patients chose stenting.

The new study aims to avoid the methodological flaw in the 2007 Courage study. Patients who agree to participate are not given angiograms before being assigned a treatment. Instead, they are accepted into the trial on the basis of noninvasive tests that indicate blocked arteries and high risk of a heart attack. Their doctors know only that an artery is blocked — not which one or how much — so they are not able to pluck out patients they believe need stents and prevent them from entering the trial.

Photo

 
A coronary stent. They are safe, but expensive. Credit Peter Earl McCollough for The New York Times

Underlying the debate about the utility of stents is an uncertainty about how and why heart attacks occur.

For years, the common notion was they were caused by a plumbing problem. In this view, plaque — pimplelike lumps — partly blocked a coronary artery and grew until no blood could get through, and a stent was needed to open an artery before it closed completely.

But a leading hypothesis says there is no predicting where a heart attack will originate. It could start anywhere there is plaque, even if the plaque is not obstructing the flow of blood in an artery. Unpredictably, a piece of plaque can burst open. Blood starts to clot on the injured area. Soon, the blood clot clogs blocks the artery. The result is a heart attack.

It is known that certain plaques, with thin walls and bursting with fat-filled white blood cells, are prone to rupture. A study published in 2011 found that only a third of heart attacks originated in plaques that were blocking at least half of an artery, as seen on an angiogram. The rest began with the rupture of plaques that appeared to be causing no problems.

According to this view of how and why heart attacks happen, stenting would not be protective because people with atherosclerosis have arteries studded with plaque. The partly blocked area visible in an angiogram is no more likely to be the site of a heart attack than any other with plaque. But statins could work because they change the nature of plaques, making them less likely to rupture.

Although stents relieve chest pain, today’s medical therapy can, too, though it may take weeks or months.

But proving whether stents make a difference is turning out to be harder than expected. Many doctors and patients have such strong opinions about the value of stenting that recruitment for the new study has been difficult. Stents have become part of the fabric of heart disease care. Former President George W. Bush, for example, had a treadmill stress test in the summer of 2013 as part of a physical examination. When the test indicated he might have a blocked artery, he had an angiogram. It showed a partial blockage that a cardiologist opened with a stent.

The challenge now is to get Ischemia done and get some answers that might not be disputed. In the past two years, researchers randomized nearly 2,000 patients for the trial at the 300 participating medical centers. The plan is to 

Treating a Heart Attack

Doctors must first reopen the blocked artery and restore the flow of blood to the heart muscles.

Doctors insert a hollow catheter through the groin or an arm, threading it up a major artery and into the heart.

A deflated balloon is passed through the catheter to the site of the blockage.

The balloon is surrounded by a metal mesh stent. Inflating the balloon opens the artery and locks the stent in place.

Hospitals have been working to reduce the time needed to insert stents in patients having heart attacks.

“Cardiologists think this is a very important study intellectually,” said Dr. Maron, who is one of the study’s authors. “But when it comes to their own patients, some cardiologists balk, even though they know we don’t have the answer.”

The issue potentially affects many heart patients. “Half the people over 65 have blockages,” Dr. Gregg W. Stone, an interventional cardiologist at Columbia, said. “If you have some degree of atherosclerosis, you have blockages.”

And once a stress test or an angiogram reveals a blockage, it can be hard to ignore a partly blocked artery, hard to avoid thinking a stent has to help.

“People believe that if they have a blockage, they have to fix it mechanically,” said Dr. Judith S. Hochman, the study chairwoman for the Ischemia trial and a cardiologist at NYU Langone. “It seems logical, but in medicine, many things that seem logical are not true.”

Not only do cardiologists find it hard to fight their own feelings that stenting makes sense, they also find it hard to persuade patients to try medical therapy, said Dr. Brahmajee Nallamothu, an interventional cardiologist at the University of Michigan.

The concept that stenting helps, he said, “is a paradigm so deeply set on the part of the public and a lot of doctors that it is tough to overcome.”

Mr. Nassar was one of the rare patients who did not hesitate to enter the trial. Though stents had relieved his pain in the past, they were no panacea. Like most heart patients, he had never taken the most important drug for those with his condition: a statin.

So far, he says he is happy with his drug treatment. His angina is gone.

“I feel no pain,” he said.

To view the original of this article CLICK HERE

.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

Enhanced by Zemanta

Statins Shown To Control Some Cancers

Statins Shown To Control Some Cancers.

 Please Be Sure To

& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide

To Give Hope & Information

 

Statins slash risk of death by cancer: They slow tumour growth by up to 50% reveal major studies

  • Experts say there is ‘overwhelming’ evidence that statins can treat cancer
  • Study showed they cut death rates for bone cancer patients by 55 per cent
  • GPs should make patients aware of pills’ new benefits, researchers say
Experts say there is now 'overwhelming' evidence that statins, which were designed to fight heart attacks and strokes, can be effective against cancer

Experts say there is now ‘overwhelming’ evidence that statins, which were designed to fight heart attacks and strokes, can be effective against cancer

Taking statins can cut your risk of dying from cancer by up to 50 per cent, two major studies have shown.

While the drugs do not seem to prevent cancer in the first place, it is believed they boost survival rates by slowing the rate at which tumours grow. 

Experts say the evidence is overwhelming that, as well preventing heart attacks and strokes, statins can be as effective at fighting cancer as conventional treatments such as chemotherapy.

A study involving almost 150,000 women found those taking statins, whether initially healthy or not, were 22 per cent less likely to die from any form of cancer than those not on the drugs.

But this effect varied between the different types of the disease. For breast cancer, statins reduced death rates by 40 per cent, for ovarian by 42 per cent and bowel by 43 per cent. 

For bone cancer, which is rarer, death rates were cut by more than half – 55 per cent. 

A separate study on 22,110 men with prostate cancer found that those who happened to be taking statins were 43 per cent less likely to die from the illness.

Researchers say GPs should make patients aware of the cancer-fighting benefits of the pills as it may sway their decision to start taking them.

Around seven million adults in Britain take statins – the most commonly prescribed drugs in the UK – to lower cholesterol levels. 

They cost just 3p a day and work by stopping the accumulation on blood vessel walls of cholesterol deposits which trigger heart attacks and strokes.

Last summer, the NHS issued new guidance saying the pills should offered to 17million adults – 40 per cent of the population – on the basis they could save up to 2,000 lives a year. 

There is growing evidence that statins may also reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. 

But many doctors are suspicious about their long-term safety and say drugs firms have downplayed their side effects, which affect one in ten and include nosebleeds, muscle pain, a sore throat and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

Nonetheless two studies presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology conference in Chicago, one from Yale University in Connecticut and the other from Rutgers University in New Jersey, show statins may help prevent cancer.

For breast cancer (pictured), statins reduced death rates by 40 per cent, for ovarian by 42 per cent and bowel by 43 per cent. For bone cancer, which is rarer, death rates were cut by more than half 

Researchers believe that, by reducing cholesterol, the pills also lower the levels of certain hormones – androgens – which encourage tumour growth. 

As well as being rendered less aggressive, the tumours are less likely to return, they say. So if someone who is taking statins gets cancer, they are more likely to survive.

Professor Noel Clarke of the Christie NHS hospital in Manchester, which specialises in treating cancer, said GPs should discuss statins with patients at high risk of cancer.

‘The balance of evidence says that statins have an anti-cancer effect,’ he said. ‘Therefore if someone is in a situation where there is increased risk of cancer, be it prostate cancer or breast, then a discussion could be had about the risks and benefits of statins. ’

GPs are being urged to make patients aware of the cancer-fighting properties of the pills, but some family doctors are concerned by the side effects

In the Yale study, researchers looked at the records of 146,326 women aged 50 to 79 over a 15-year period. 

Those taking statins were on average 22 per cent less likely to die from any form of cancer, regardless of how long they had been on the drugs.

Ange Wang, of the Stanford University School of Medicine said: ‘We’re definitely very excited by these results.’ 

Referring to whether GPs should prescribe statins for cancer prevention, she added: ‘I think it should be a priority, given how common statins are.’

The Rutgers study showed that men with prostate cancer were 42 per cent less likely to die from the disease if they were taking either statins or metformin –a diabetes drug.

Lead researcher Grace Lu-Yao said tests on rats had shown that taking statins and metformin were as effective as the common chemotherapy drug docetaxel in treating prostate cancer.

Despite the benefits of statins, a number of leading doctors and academics oppose prescribing them widely to healthy adults because of possible long-term side effects.

Recently a professor who had advocated widespread use of statins announced he was carrying out a review into their safety.

Sir Rory Collins of Oxford University is to examine the records of tens of thousands of patients to establish how many may have suffered side effects.

Six of the 12 experts who drew-up NHS guidance on the drugs have received funding from firms that manufacture statins.

SCREEN WOMEN IN THEIR 30s FOR BREAST CANCER GENE, EXPERTS SAY 

Women in their 30s should be offered screening to assess their risk of breast cancer, experts say.

They are calling for the NHS to offer simple blood tests to identify genetic faults that increase the likelihood of the disease. 

Around one woman in 400 carries mutations in her BRCA1 or 2 genes that increase their risk of breast or ovarian cancer by up to 90 per cent.

Actress Angelina Jolie, 39, chose to have her breasts and ovaries removed because her chances of getting cancer were so high. 

Researchers say women should be offered a simple blood test to examine whether they carry the BRCA1 or 2 genes that increase their risk of breast or ovarian cancer by up to 90 per cent (file image)

Researchers say women should be offered a simple blood test to examine whether they carry the BRCA1 or 2 genes that increase their risk of breast or ovarian cancer by up to 90 per cent (file image)

But many women are unaware they carry these genes. Researchers say the current system, which relies on GPs referring women for tests if they have a family history of cancer, at best identifies less than two in three.

About 80 per cent of women with the genes will go on to develop breast cancer – there are 2,200 such cases in the UK each year. 

The illness usually develops in their 30s and 40s and about half die because tumours are very aggressive.

Dr Elizabeth Swisher, professor of medical genetics at Washington University in Seattle, said routine NHS screening for women in their 30s was a ‘no brainer.’

But NICE, the NHS rationing body, is unlikely to see it as cost-effective to offer the tests, which would cost around £200 a time to all women.

However Dr Swisher, who yesterday led a debate at the American Society for Clinical Oncology conference, said: ‘It would definitely save lives. Not only are they aggressive cancers, they are early onset so you have a lot of years of life to save.’

To view the original article CLICK HERE

.

.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

Enhanced by Zemanta