Keeping Your Hair On Through Chemo

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Keeping Your Hair in Chemo

To view the original article CLICK HERE

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Greg_L-W.
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 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
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Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
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You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
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New target discovered for kidney cancer therapy

New target discovered for kidney cancer therapy
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Kidney and blader 1200 resolution 612KB
New target discovered
for kidney cancer therapy

Last updated: 12 November 2014 at 12am PST

Cancer / Oncology
Urology / Nephrology

Cincinnati Cancer Center (CCC) researchers have discovered that a membrane channel, Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 3, or TRPM3, promotes growth of kidney cancer tumors, and targeting this channel therapeutically could lead to more treatments for a disease that currently has few treatment options.

A membrane channel is a family of proteins that allows the movement of ions, water or other solutions to pass through the membrane.

These findings were published in the journal Cancer Cell.

“Metastatic clear cell kidney cancer is largely incurable, and existing treatments for the disease are only minimally effective,” says Maria Czyzyk-Krzeska, MD, PhD, senior author of the study, member of the CCC and the University of Cincinnati (UC) Cancer Institute and professor in UC’s department of cancer biology. “Our team found a new target in kidney cancer known as TRPM3. TRPM3 is increased in 60 percent of kidney clear cell carcinomas where it promotes growth of tumors by stimulating intracellular pathways that initiate autophagy – a quality control process in cancer cells that also generates intracellular nutrients.

“During tumor growth, cancer cells become addicted to autophagy as a source of nutrients. Furthermore, autophagy contributes to chemotherapy resistance in kidney cancer. The new target we’ve identified regulates kidney cancer cell autophagy.”

The experiments were conducted using animal models, human cell cultures and tumor specimens. The researchers analyzed expression of the channel, its effect on tumor growth and on autophagy and how regulation of autophagy contributed to tumor growth.

“Our discovery of a TRPM3 stimulated network in the regulation of autophagy and kidney cancer growth could lead to use of the channel as a new actionable target in renal cancer. There are already FDA-approved TRPM3 inhibitors on the market, so this is quite promising,” Czyzyk-Krezeska says.

To view the original of this article  CLICK HERE
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Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
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IN MEMORIAM – Rebekah Gibbs – Actress & Mum aged 41

IN MEMORIAM – Rebekah Gibbs – Actress & Mum aged 41
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Tragedy as Casualty star Rebekah Gibbs, 41, passes away after six-year battle with breast cancer

  • The actress appeared in the BBC show for more than 100 episodes
  • She was first diagnosed in 2008 when her daughter was just 10 weeks old 
  • Her friend Michelle Grant has spoken of her strength and kindness 
  • Cancer was in remission but she had a seizure while on holiday in Devon
  • It emerged the former Broadway star had tumours in brain and lung

The best friend of Rebekah Gibbs has spoken of the Casualty actor’s incredible bravery as she struggled against breast cancer. 

The 41-year-old mother-of-one, who appeared in more than 100 episodes of the BBC show as paramedic Nina Farr, died from the disease on Tuesday after a six-year battle. 

Michelle Grant, 41, says she was devoted to Gigi, who was just 10 week old when her mother was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008.

Rebekah Gibbs, pictured with her daughter Gigi, has died after a six-year battle with breast cancer

 

Rebekah Gibbs, pictured left with her daughter Gigi, has died after a six-year battle with breast cancer. Her best friend Michelle (pictured with Rebekah, right) has spoken of the Casualty actor’s incredible bravery

Michelle (left) and Rebekah (centre left) met in a stage production of Grease in 1999, playing Frenchie and Rizzo alongside Matt Goss as Danny (centre right)

Michelle (left) and Rebekah (centre left) met in a stage production of Grease in 1999, playing Frenchie and Rizzo alongside Matt Goss as Danny (centre right)

Michelle first met Rebekah while they were performing in a stage production of Grease in 1999. The pair, playing Frenchie and Rizzo, quickly became best friends.

Michelle, who runs a production company, told MailOnline: ‘She was the most wonderful person.

‘She never let it get on top of her. She worked as hard as she could to bring up Gigi.

‘When she had radiotherapy there were times she wasn’t allowed to be with the baby and it broke her heart.’ 

After chemotherapy and radiotherapy and a double mastectomy and was given the all-clear after five years in 2013.

But a few months later she had a seizure while on holiday in Devon. She was taken to hospital and was told the cancer had spread to her brain and lungs.

'She never let it get on top of her. She worked as hard as she could to bring up Gigi'

‘She never let it get on top of her. She worked as hard as she could to bring up Gigi’

Happiest day: Michelle and Rebekah at Michelle's wedding. Michelle says the death has left her heartbroken

Happiest day: Michelle and Rebekah at Michelle’s wedding. Michelle says the death has left her heartbroken

She died on Tuesday afternoon in a hospice.

Michelle, herself a mother of a two-year-old girl, spoke of the shock her friends and family felt when the cancer returned.

‘It was just heartbreaking. She had the scan and it had got into her lungs. That was it.

‘The chemo would prolong her life but they had to stop treatment in June because it wasn’t working.’ 

She added ‘She was always thinking of her little girl. Her husband Ash has been her rock and his mum Nonny has constantly cared for Gigi.

‘There are so many people that loved her, everyone she knew loved her. When she spoke to you, it would feel as if you were the only person in her life at that moment.

‘I told her I would be talking to her for eternity. She said that for her last few days she wanted love and stroking and candles in the room. She didn’t like people to cry.’

The 41-year-old appeared in more than 100 episodes of Casualty as paramedic Nina Farr from 2004 to 2006

The 41-year-old appeared in more than 100 episodes of Casualty as paramedic Nina Farr from 2004 to 2006

Rebekah Gibbs and her husband Ashley. He said Rebekah had wonderful support towards the end of her life

Rebekah Gibbs and her husband Ashley. He said Rebekah had wonderful support towards the end of her life

She added: ‘She was loved until the very end. For the last few months she was never left alone.

‘She was quite outrageous and a wonderful person. She was all about high heels and lip gloss and she’d be on the dance floor high kicking.

‘She was a character but a sensitive soul.’ 

Her husband Ashley released a statement, saying: ‘Rebekah had wonderful care and felt loved and safe right up until the end, especially with the outstanding nursing staff at the Hospice in the Weald, who were exceptional.

‘I’d like to thank them and her dear, loving friends, from the bottom of my heart for all the love and support we received over the last year. Without which Rebekah and I would not have been able to cope.

 

Rebekah (left, on her wedding day with Gigi, first noticed a lump at Christmas in 2007, when she was seven and a half months pregnant

‘I’d also like to thank everyone for their kind wishes and messages at this difficult time. My daughter and I take a great deal of comfort from this as we come to terms with life without our Rebekah.’

Rebekah first noticed a lump at Christmas in 2007, when she was seven and a half months pregnant.

Initially she thought it was the baby moving, but was horrified when she realised it was a walnut-sized mass in her left breast. 

Anxious that it might be a tumour, she went first to her GP then a locum doctor. Both of them initially told her that she had a blocked milk duct.  

Speaking to the Mail in 2009, she said: ‘The private consultant I [eventually] saw said he believed it was cancer even before he ran a single test.

‘At that moment it was as though a bomb had exploded inside my world, destroying every certainty.

‘I could barely think.

‘Although Gigi was crying with hunger, the last thing I wanted to do was to get out my breast and start feeding her, knowing there was something alien and poisonous growing in there, but I knew she needed my milk.

‘It was surreal; I was only 35, with a newborn baby. I couldn’t have imagined that something so awful could happen.’

Rebekah had planned to breast-feed for six months. Instead, she was given a drug to dry up her milk supply before surgery to remove the tumour.

‘That was a particularly devastating moment,’ she recalled. ‘Suddenly being a mother wasn’t the priority; the priority was staying alive.’

More blows were to follow: a biopsy showed the cancer was grade three – a very aggressive form – and an examination of her lymph nodes revealed the disease had spread.

The actress with daughter Gigi, aged three months. She was devastated as she couldn't breast feed

The actress with daughter Gigi, aged three months. She was devastated as she couldn’t breast feed

Still smiling, still beautiful: Rebekah during her chemo treatment. After chemotherapy and radiotherapy and a double mastectomy and was given the all-clear after five years in 2013

Still smiling, still beautiful: Rebekah during her chemo treatment. After chemotherapy and radiotherapy and a double mastectomy and was given the all-clear after five years in 2013

So what should have been a time of joy at the arrival of her baby became a daily battle with despair as she and her fiancé, garage owner Ashley Pitman, 47, faced up to the challenges that lay ahead.

The days and weeks were marked out not by Gigi’s precious milestones but hospital appointments and gruelling rounds of chemotherapy. ‘I missed out on so much,’ says Rebekah.

‘When I had my first round of chemo I felt so sick that I couldn’t interact with Gigi – all I could do was come home and take her to bed with me.

Then I realised I would have to hand her over to someone – my mother, Ash’s mother or my neighbour Victoria – because she needed stimulation to grow.

‘On the day I started to lose my hair from the chemo, I was changing her nappy and she reached up and stroked my head. She gave me such strength through the toughest of times.’

Her agent Belfield and Ward tweeted the news of her death: ‘Darling Rebekah Gibbs, a true inspiration and dazzling light, never to be forgotten.’ 

James Redmond, who starred with Gibbs in Casualty tweeted: ‘So sad to hear lovely Rebekah Gibbs has passed away. She lit up every room with her smile and positivity. R.I.P.’

Coronation Street actress Hayley Tamaddon tweeted: ‘My dear friend passed away today. A true star, always smiling and so positive.

By the time Rebekah was finally diagnosed with breast cancer, her daughter Gigi was ten weeks old

By the time Rebekah was finally diagnosed with breast cancer, her daughter Gigi was ten weeks old

James Redmond, who starred with Gibbs in Casualty tweeted: 'So sad to hear lovely Rebekah Gibbs has passed away. She lit up every room with her smile and positivity. R.I.P'

James Redmond, who starred with Gibbs in Casualty tweeted: ‘So sad to hear lovely Rebekah Gibbs has passed away. She lit up every room with her smile and positivity. R.I.P’

 
Rebekah Gibbs stars alongside James Redmond in Casualty (Archive)
 

 

‘So many memories. We will never forget you Becky. Keep twinkling. Wherever you are.’

Born in Torquay, Devon, Rebekah attended the Doreen Bird College of Performing Arts in Sidcup, whose alumni include Spice Girl Mel C.

She appeared in the West End musicals Starlight Express, Grease and Fame before landing the part of Nina Farr, a paramedic, in Casualty in 2004.

She left in 2006 to start a family, and went into healthy living overdrive; she was training for a half-marathon when she found out she was expecting Gigi.

Poignantly, in a book she wrote about her struggle with the disease, Gibbs wrote a moving open letter to Gigi, telling her how much she loves her.

‘The book is part of my preparations for Gigi’s life, with or without me,’ she said.

‘If I can’t be there, all I want is for her and Ash to be happy.

‘But for now, I have to concentrate on how much joy and fun I can cram into our remaining time together, because I have no way of knowing how long I’ve got.’

For information about donations to the hospice that cared for Rebekah, The Hospice in the Weald can be followed on Twitter on: @hospiceweald.

Their website is http://www.hospiceintheweald.org.uk

To read the original article CLICK HERE
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Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

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Look for Cancer, and Find It!

Look for Cancer, and Find It!
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Look for Cancer, and Find It

Keith Negley

Mammography has become a fighting word in recent years, with some researchers questioning its value and others staunchly defending it.

One especially disturbing criticism is that screening mammography may lead to “overtreatment,” in which some women go through grueling therapies — surgery, radiation, chemotherapy — that they do not need. Indeed, some studies estimate that 19 percent or more of women whose breast cancers are found by mammography wind up being overtreated.

DESCRIPTION
Picture Your Life
Faces of Breast Cancer

We asked our readers to share insights from their experiences with breast cancer. Here are some of their stories.

This problem occurs, researchers say, because mammography can “overdiagnose” breast cancer, meaning that some of the tiny cancers it finds would probably never progress or threaten the patient’s life. But they are treated anyway.

So where are these overtreated women? Nobody knows.

They are out there somewhere, studies suggest. But the figures on overtreatment are based on theory and calculations, not on counting the heads of actual patients known to have experienced it. No one can point to a particular woman and say, “Here’s a patient who went through the wringer for nothing.”

Overdiagnosis is not the same as a false positive result, in which a test like a mammogram initially suggests a problem but is proved wrong. False positives are frightening and expensive, but overtreatment is the potential harm of mammography that worries doctors most, according to an article published last week in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

But the authors also say that estimates of how often overdiagnosis and overtreatment occur are among the least reliable and most controversial of all the data on mammography.

In the past, overdiagnosis was thought to apply mainly to ductal carcinoma in situ, or D.C.I.S., a breast growth that may or may not turn cancerous. Now, researchers think that invasive cancers are also being overdiagnosed and overtreated by mammography.

The concept of overtreatment is based on the belief that not all breast cancers are deadly. Some never progress, researchers suspect, and some progress so slowly that the patient will probably die of something else, particularly if she is older or has other health problems.

But mammography can find all of these tumors, even those too small to feel. And doctors and patients rarely watch and wait — once a tumor is found, it is treated, because nobody knows how to tell the dangerous ones from those that could be safely left alone.

“Everyone has an anecdote of a small spot on mammography year after year that was finally biopsied and turned out to be positive — invasive, low grade,” said Dr. Constance Lehman, a radiologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center and the director of breast imaging at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Where do the numerical estimates of overdiagnosis come from? In several large studies of mammography screening, women judged to have the same risk of breast cancer were picked at random to have the test or to skip it. Early on, more cancers were expected in the mammogram group, because the test can find small tumors.

Over time, the groups should have equalized, because if small tumors in the unscreened group were really life-threatening, they would have grown big enough to be felt or caused other symptoms.

But in several studies, the number of cancers in the unscreened group never caught up with the number in the mammography group. The reason for the difference, researchers assume, is that there must have been women in the unscreened group who had cancers that were never diagnosed and never progressed — and therefore did not need treatment.

The next step is to subtract the number of cancers in the unscreened group from the number in the mammography group. The result is the estimate of how many women in the mammography group were overtreated.

“We don’t know which individual women those were,” said Dr. Lydia E. Pace, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, an author of the new paper. “All we know is the proportion, and a lot of people would argue that we don’t really know the proportion.”

This kind of calculation was used in a Canadian study of about 90,000 women, published in February in the journal BMJ. The authors found that after 15 years there was a “residual excess” of 106 invasive cancers in the mammography group. The authors attributed that to overdiagnosis, and said that it amounted to 22 percent of the 484 invasive cancers found by mammography. They concluded that for every 424 women who had mammography in the study, one was overdiagnosed.

Other studies have estimated overdiagnosis in different ways, with huge variations in the results, reporting that 5 percent to 50 percent of cancers found on mammograms are overdiagnosed. To make it clear that the numbers are uncertain, some offer ranges: For example, one says that if 10,000 50-year-old women have annual mammograms for 10 years, 30 to 137 women will be overdiagnosed.

It is frightening to consider the prospect that mammography could be leading some down a slippery slope to unneeded surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, with all their risks and side effects. But the numbers on overdiagnosis are all over the map, a shaky foundation on which to base important decisions.

The best hope for resolving the confusion may lie in molecular tests that can tell the difference between dangerous tumors and those unlikely to progress — but those tests are in the future.

A version of this article appears in print on 04/08/2014, on page D6 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Look for Cancer, and Find It.
To view the original article CLICK HERE
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Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

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Warning Signs of Breast Cancer

 

Warning Signs of Breast Cancer
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Breast Pain or Lump: Is it Cancer?


A sharp pain in your breast, possibly with some tenderness, can be scary. It may have you wondering if it could be something serious.A breast lump is often the thing women — and even men — notice that spurs a visit to their doctors. While early stage breast cancer shows no symptoms, timely detection can turn breast cancer into a survivor’s tale.This slideshow covers signs, symptoms, and types of breast cancer. Click through to learn important information you should know.

Causes of Pain & Tenderness

We often associate pain with something wrong, so when women feel tenderness or pain in their breast they often assume the worst — breast cancer. However, breast pain is rarely the first noticeable symptom of breast cancer. Several other factors can cause the pain.Breast pain — clinically called mastalgia — can also be caused by the following:fluctuation of hormones caused by menstruation
a side effect of some birth control pills
a bra that doesn’t fit
stress

Breast Lumps

A lump in the breast isn’t always cancerous. From hormonal changes in teens to damaged fat tissue, more than 80 percent of all breast lumps are noncancerous for women under the age of 40.Common causes of benign breast lumps include:breast infection
fibrocystic breast disease
fibroadenoma (noncancerous tumor)
fat necrosis (damaged tissue)

With fat necrosis, the mass cannot be distinguished from a cancerous lump without a biopsy. Tests for breast cancer are explained later.

Signs of Breast Cancer

While often caused by less severe conditions, a breast lump, pain, and tenderness are often the things most associated with breast cancer. Other symptoms of breast cancer include:nipple discharge or retraction of the nipple
enlargement of one breast
dimpling of the breast surface
an “orange peel” texture to the skin
vaginal pain
unintentional weight loss
enlarged lymph nodes in the armpit
visible veins on the breast
If you experience any of those symptoms, you should see your doctor. Breast exams are covered on the next page.

Breast Exams

When you visit your doctor with concerns about breast pain, tenderness or a lump, there are common tests he or she will perform:Mammogram: an x-ray of the breast to help tell between a benign and malignant mass
Biopsy: removal of a small amount of breast tissue for testing
Ultrasound: use of ultrasonic sound waves to produce an image of the tissue
MRI: Normally used in conjunction with other tests, magnetic resonance imaging is another noninvasive way to examine breast tissue

Types of Breast Cancer

Two categories reflect the nature of the cancer:Noninvasive (in situ): cancer has not spread from the original tissue (Stage 0)
Invasive (infiltrating): cancer cells have spread to surrounding tissues (Stages I-IV)
The tissue affected determines the type of cancer:Ductal carcinoma: cancer forms in the lining of the milk ducts (most common)
Lobular carcinoma: cancer in the lobules of the breast where milk is produced
Sarcoma: cancer in the breast’s connective tissue (rare)

Genes and Hormones Affect Cancer Growth

Geneticists are starting to learn how genes affect the growth of cancer and have even identified one:HER-2: HER-2 in cancer cells fuels their growth. Medications can help shut the HER-2 gene down.
Like genes, hormones can also speed up the growth of some types of breast cancers that have hormone receptors.Estrogen receptor positive: this cancer uses estrogen to grow
Progesterone receptor positive: this cancer is fueled by progesterone
Hormone receptor negative: doesn’t use hormones as fuel (no hormone receptors)

Treatments

Depending on the type and stage of cancer, treatments can vary. However, there are some common practices doctors and specialists use to combat breast cancer:Mastectomy: surgical removal of part or the whole breast to remove a tumor and connecting tissue
Lumpectomy: removes the tumor while leaving the breast intact
Chemotherapy: the most common cancer treatment, chemotherapy uses anticancer drugs to interfere with cells’ ability to reproduce
Radiation: another standard in the fight against cancer, radiation uses X-rays to directly treat cancer
Hormone & Targeted Therapy: used when either genes or hormones play a part in the cancer’s growth

Prognosis

As with any cancer, early detection and treatment is a major factor in determining the outcome. Breast cancer is easily treated and usually curable when detected in the earliest of stages.The American Cancer Society says the five-year survival rate for Stage 0 to Stage II breast cancer is more than 80 percent. Stage III breast cancer five-year survival rate is still more than 50 percent

Staying Ahead of Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Whether you’re concerned about breast pain or tenderness, it’s important to stay informed on risk factors and warning signs of breast cancer.The best way to fight breast cancer is early detection, whether that be self-examinations or regular mammograms. If you’re worried that your breast pain or tenderness could be something serious, make an appointment with your doctor today.
Stage 4 Breast Cancer: Possible Complications You Should Know About
Stage 4 Breast Cancer: Possible Complications You Should Know About
CLICK HERE»
Stage 4 Breast Cancer: Understand Your Treatment Options
Stage 4 Breast Cancer: Understand Your Treatment Options
CLICK HERE»
Advanced Breast Cancer: Your Support Options
Advanced Breast Cancer: Your Support Options
CLICK HERE»
This page is compiled with data from http://www.healthline.com
Health line also provided the less factual but anecdotal article:
Breast Cancer
14 Inspiring Breast Cancer Quotes
Written by Rachael Maier
Being diagnosed with breast cancer is a life-changing experience. It can be hard to handle the news at first, and even harder to know how to proceed, no matter your prognosis.
While everyone’s journey is unique, knowing that others before you have been through something similar can give you the strength and inspiration you need to keep everything in perspective.
Click through the slideshow for the type of wisdom gained from great personal struggle, and know that you’re not alone.
Which you may find helpful CLICK HERE
.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

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The Fight for Life IS Surviving Cancer!

The Fight for Life IS Surviving Cancer!

.

 Please Be Sure To

& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide

To Give Hope & Information

 .

Cancer Survivor: To Fight Is to Live

If you aren’t interested in Lisa Adams’ 160,000 posts about her cancer, by all means go back to your cat photos. It’s a big web.

Lisa Bonchek Adams
lisabadams.com/

Cancer is really great material to work with. The comedienne Tig Notaro discovered this after making cancer part of her routine. (Opening line, “Hello, I have cancer. How are you?”) Dozens of people in my profession—which always had way too many smokers—wrote themselves into the grave, some quite elegantly. After my own cancer diagnosis, I swore I wasn’t going to write myself into the grave if the chemo and the surgery didn’t stop the disease. Nor was I going turn my disease into magazine fodder.

Then, not long after I returned to work, a cancer story popped up that was directly related to my treatment, and the managing editor asked me if I was interested. I hesitated. How many pages, I inquired. Four. “I’m in.” As a journalist, you have to work with what the news gives you–and take all the space you can get.

So I began to write about cancer, especially cancer research, occasionally revealing details of my own illness. I thought it would serve the reader. I took part in a drug study and urged other cancer patients to at least explore the trials available to them. Being a lab rat, it turns out, you get a little extra attention, too. And having been a customer gives you a certain amount of journalistic leverage with the scientists and physicians you are covering. They may know the biology of the disease (or some of it, cancer is monstrously complicated); but I lived it. I occasionally hear from readers seeking advice on treatment options, or about the surgery (horrible), about the hospitals where I was treated. I try to help them as best I can.

Lisa Bonchek Adams has also been sharing her case information, in more than 160,000 tweets that this Connecticut mother of three has posted since she started down cancer’s path seven years ago. Adams has taken part in drug trials at Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital in New York City, but her breast cancer has advanced to stage IV and  spread to other organs. She’s in desperate shape, hanging in and tweeting hard.  “I gather up my pump cords, release myself from the wall’s grip. I walk, counter-clockwise around the nurse’s station with a vengeance, trying to push the pain and discomfort away,” she tweeted recently. I recognize that  pain; and that walk.  If you are walking you are not dying; I think I set the record for laps around the floor of the hospital, where I was treated.

Her relentless tweeting recently got the attention of Emma and Bill Keller—he’s the former New York Times editor turned columnist; she writes for the UK’s Guardian—who each tried to address some touchy issues with what critics thought were lead fingers. Mr. Keller suggested that his father-in-law’s quiet, no-heroic-measures taken death from cancer might have something to offer to U.S. healthcare providers, given the enormous cost of end-of-life care. Every battle can’t be fought to the last soldier, Mr. Keller suggested, and Adams’ daily battle briefs were raising false hopes about the benefits of experimental drugs. As for Adams herself, he wondered whether her blog was more about her than a public service to cancer patients. “Social media have become a kind of self-medication,” he wrote, bloodlessly. Mrs. Keller explored the idea that Adams was oversharing: “Are her tweets a grim equivalent of deathbed selfies, one step further than funeral selfies?”

Go ahead and just die already, was the takeaway, unfairly or not. The outrage within the cancer and journalism communities was such that the Guardian pulled the plug on Mrs. Keller’s story .

Having once experienced stage IV cancer, I understand Adams’ desire to fight it with every drug that Memorial can throw at her. If they had told me to drink mercury I would have asked for a double—and keep in mind that in many drug trials that is essentially what’s going on: You get dosed with poison while the clinicians try to guess whether the poison will kill you or the cancer first. But patients are fully informed. No one—especially not doctors—administers under the delusion that these are miracle drugs. Cancer treatment is still a three yards and a cloud of dust offense. The gains are small but they keep coming, which is why the trials need to be ongoing. And compared with the trials of decades past (read Siddhartha Mukherjee’s The Emperor of All Maladies for the horrifying accounts) the drug protocols are at least humane.

I also understand Adams’ desire, if not her need, to share her world with the blogosphere. It’s the literary equivalent of pacing the hallways. Or affirming that you are still here.  My approach took a different format. I worked out like a maniac and continued to play basketball and soccer until the day before my surgery. Every dribble seemed like I was adding a day to my life. It was all completely irrational but you do what you can to stay sane.

Adams posts are completely rational, and some are completely compelling. Whether hers is a hopeless case at this point isn’t for the Kellers to decide, or even debate for that matter. If you are not interested in Lisa Adams’ radiation treatments, or anyone else’s, by all means go back to your cat photos if that’s what you like. It’s a big web. But people like Adams are going to become more numerous because cancer has outlasted other diseases to become our top killer. Cancer will kill more than 400,000 people this year, even as the funding for the National Cancer Institutes got cut in last year’s political knife fight.  Adams will remind us, until her last breath it seems, that this is a war we are still losing.

To view the original article CLICK HERE
To read Lisa Bonchek Adams’ blog CLICK HERE

I for one can identify with this article, clearly not with the breast cancer a friend of mine is going through and another friend of mine’s sister was operated on for in October, but for instance when hospitalised but a bit mobile I can often be found marching (well dragging myself along) in corridors of the hospital 1/2 mile from my bed at 2 am as I push a drain stand or a drip stand just to remind myself I’m not beat yet and try to get strong enough to leave hospital and continue witjh a more normal life at home.

I do commend ever more reading on and around the subject as the more you know the more you can help yourself and others.

.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

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Cancer Death Rates Exacerbated by Kidney Function

Cancer Death Rates Exacerbated by Kidney Function
.

 Please Be Sure To

& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide

To Give Hope & Information

 .

Reduced Kidney Function Hikes Cancer Death Risk

Decreased kidney function may place individuals at increased risk of cancer-related death, new study findings suggest.

In a study that included 4,077 individuals aged 49-97 years, each 10 mL/min/1.73 m2 decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was associated with a significant 18% increase in cancer-specific mortality, independent of age, smoking status, gender, blood pressure, and serum fibrinogen, and fasting blood glucose levels, according to findings published online ahead of print in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases.

The highest risks of cancer death associated with reduced kidney function were in subjects with urinary tract and breast cancers, Germaine Wong, MD, PhD, of Westmead Hospital in New South Wales, Australia, and colleagues reported. Compared with subjects with an eGFR of 60 or higher, those with an eGFR below 60 had a 2.5 times increased risk of death from urinary tract cancers after adjusting for age, gender, and smoking status. Women with an eGFR below 60 had a twofold increased risk of death from breast cancer, after adjusting for age, smoking, and employment status.

Additionally, among subjects diagnosed with incident cancer after the start of the study, the overall risk of cancer death increased significantly by at least 14% for each 10 mL/min/1.73 m2 decrease in eGFR, in adjusted analyses. In this group of cancer patients, participants with an eGFR below 45 had a 2.3-fold increased risk of cancer death than those with an eGFR of 75 or higher.

“Our observed link between reduced kidney function and cancer mortality is novel,” the authors wrote. “Although there are emerging data showing an increased risk of non-cardiovascular death in the non-dialysis-dependent population, the linear association between decreased kidney function and cancer-specific mortality reported in our study is a new finding.”

Dr. Wong’s group observed that epidemiologic studies suggest that cancers of the urinary tract may be more resistant to treatment and prone to recurrence among individuals with decreased renal function.

The investigators noted that breast cancer is one of the few cancers that do not incur a heightened risk in patients with kidney disease and with kidney transplants. “The observed increased risk of death from breast cancer in women with reduced eGFR therefore is unexpected and strengthens our hypothesis that having decreased kidney function itself is a predictor for poor cancer outcomes,” they wrote.

During a median follow-up period of 12.8 years, 1,418 deaths occurred. Of these, 370 were due to cancer.

To view the original article CLICK HERE

.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW