Life's Roller Coaster

If I'm missing, or not taking messages sorry – I'm more angry about letting my friends down than YOU will ever be at being let down! Unfortunately that is sometimes a side effect of Cancer! Mea Culpa: may I blame being short fused & grumpy on it too! My first symptoms presented in Nov-1998 – Follow The Trail on >DIARY of CANCER< Immediately Below!

How to Check if You Have a Lump on Your Breast …

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How to Check if You Have a Lump on Your Breast …
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Posted by:
Greg Lance – Watkins
Greg_L-W

eMail:
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The BLOG:
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The Main Web Site:
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Hi,

minded that a friend in her 50s had a Radical Mastectomy last week, having chosen to have a Lumpectomy &sSeveral Scrapes previously to avoid a Mastectomy we can but hope the delay she brought on herself does not prove fatal!

BREAST RECONSTRUCTION 02

That another friend is sheduled to have some 12″ of bowel, the Ascending Colon, removed to remove several sites of early stage cancer later today, and will be returning sometime later to have various less ominous polyps removed from the Colon – he can with some justification be more optimistic having discovered the problem early from the national bi-annual bowel screening & a resultant Colonoscopy.

COLON 01

Also another friend just 50, 10 days ago had her Ovaries and part of her Fallopian Tubes + her Uterus removed, due to pre-cancerous Cysts

ovarian-cancer-01

There’s a lot of it about!

Looking out for the symptoms & not just detecting it early but dealing with it as soon as possible, prefferably in its early stages, offers the best chances of survival!

How to Check if You Have a Lump on Your Breast

Follow this step-by-step guide to perform a breast self-examination.

Breast cancer is the most prevalent type of cancer among women, and every year the number of deaths from it increases.

So what’s a gal to do? The best bet is to learn how to perform a breast self-exam accurately and trust your instincts if you think something isn’t right. The self-exam may identify an undetected lump, while a screening can highlight previously undetected issues.

Research on the best way to detect breast cancer early varies. But the low-tech breast self-exam, if performed accurately, can aid in the detection of breast cancer, as do routine mammograms.

Breast self-exam steps

Doctors recommend performing a monthly breast self-exam about five days after your period starts so that your breasts won’t be tender.

click image to view larger

1. Take a good look.

Standing in front of the mirror, scan your breasts for any changes in size, color or shape. Hold your arms by your side, then raise them up and do the same scan.

Make an appointment with your doctor if you notice any of the following:
• Rash or swelling
• Bloody discharge coming from the nipples
• Odd dimples, puckering or bulging underneath the skin
• A nipple that has changed position or become retracted
• Lump or a hard nodule
• Veins on one breast that are larger than the other

2. Do a touch test lying down.

Lying down, use your right hand to examine your left breast. Your breast should be as flat as possible on your chest.

Keeping the pads of your fingers together and flat, move in a circular motion in small intervals around the breast, working from top to bottom and from side to side.

Your self-exam should cover the area from your collarbone to the top of your sternum and from your armpit to the middle of your chest. Be intentional and work slowly so that you check the entire breast.

Vary the pressure so that you feel through the various layers of tissue. Use light pressure for the outer layer of tissue, medium pressure for the middle layer and firm pressure to feel the deep tissue.

Then repeat the entire process, using your left hand on your right breast.

3. Do a touch test standing up.

Using the same technique, examine both of your breasts while standing. Some women find this step easier to do in the shower when the skin is wet and easier to manipulate.

It should go without saying that if you find a lump during your self-test, tell your doctor. But don’t panic — a mammogram should tell you more.

“The most important piece of advice for women is to get your screening mammograms,” said Maria Nelson, MD, assistant professor of clinical surgery at Keck School of Medicine of USC and a breast surgeon at the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center of Keck Medicine of USC.

If you or your doctor suspects that you have symptoms of breast cancer, a biopsy will be performed to determine whether there is a malignancy and what further action should be taken.

To view the original article CLICK HERE

By Heidi Tyline King

As one of the eight original National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated comprehensive cancer centers in the United States, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center at Keck Medicine of USC is one of the preeminent academic medical institutions in the country. If you are in the Los Angeles area, make an appointment by calling (800) USC-CARE (800-872-2273) or visiting Cancer.KeckMedicine.org/request-an-appointment.

 

.
Regards,
     Greg_L-W
Greg Lance-Watkins
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving my wife Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.

If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings. . Later in the sequence of my experiences with cancer you will note that I introduce some results and events most probably linked with cancer such as enlarged & damaged Prostate and a consequential Heart Attack leaving me with no right coronary artery! . I have also included numerous articles and anecdotes regarding health – primarily related to cancer, prostate and heart conditions – FYI! . Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar. . You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help you in ANY way. .

Regards,
Greg_L-W.

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Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins
tel: 44 (0)1594 – 528 337
Calls from ‘Number Withheld’ phones Are Blocked

All unanswered messages are recorded.
Leave your name & a UK land line number & I will return your call.

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Christi Salcedo Displays Her Life Saving Double Mastectomy

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Christi Salcedo Displays Her Life Saving Double Mastectomy
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Posted by:
Greg Lance – Watkins
Greg_L-W

eMail: Greg_L-W@BTconnect.com

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Hi,

This Breast Cancer Survivor’s Moving Selfie Makes an Important Point About Womanhood

June 2, 2016

And she stands up for transgender rights in the process

Christi Salcedo, a mother who underwent chemotherapy and a bilateral mastectomy last year, wrote on Facebook that she chose not to have breast reconstruction because her children had already witnessed her go through so many treatments. “I wanted them to see me strong again. I wanted them to have their Mother they knew,” Salcedo said.

“Until recently I have been very comfortable with my decision,” she said. But now, Salcedo says the current debate over whether transgender people can use the bathroom for the gender with which they identify has impacted how she’s seen in public.

“I am personally of the belief that no transgender person wants to cause trouble in a bathroom,” she wrote in a Facebook post, while arguing that “the great bathroom debate of 2016 has hurt more than just the transgender community.”

“Recently I notice more eyes trying to figure me out,” Salcedo wrote underneath a selfie of herself post-bilateral mastectomy. “At the grocery store, restaurants … Walmart was the worst. I want to scream, ‘YES! You are seeing it right! This is Breast Cancer… Please check yourself!’ But instead I let my eyes meet theirs in an almost plea for a change in what has become our society.”

Salcedo says she wanted help people become more aware of how cancer impacts the body—and that you don’t need breasts to be a woman. “Persons undergoing cancer treatment or post cancer treatment may lack hair & wear a baseball hat,” she wrote. “They may have undergone a mastectomy like myself. Please consider these things.”

Read her full post below:

It’s time I said this. Take a good hard look at my chest. Don’t feel weird doing it. There is nothing sacred or sexual left to see.

What is there for you to see is a hollowed arm pit. Breast cancer spreads first to your underarm lymph nodes. Seeing as mine was under my left arm, they removed all of my lymph nodes & a lot of tissue. You may also note an incision that is disfigured as this kept opening up post surgery.

While I can see that the pink ribbon brings comfort to some… I want you to know that breast cancer is ugly. It’s not an easy or a glam cancer to have. In fact cancers are one & the same to me. Cells run wild. Immune system compromised.

It robbed me of a precious part of myself that I once nourished my children with. It took away part of my sexual identity. Now that’s if we’re just talking about my breasts or my former breasts I’ll say.

When I chose to not have reconstruction it was for many reasons but most importantly it was because my children had seen me down enough. I wanted them to see me strong again. I wanted them to have their Mother they knew.

Until recently I have been very comfortable with my decision. However… The great bathroom debate of 2016 has hurt more than just the transgender community.

It has hurt us survivors. Recently I notice more eyes trying to figure me out. At the grocery store, restaurants … Walmart was the worst. I want to scream, YES! You are seeing it right! This is Breast Cancer… Please check yourself!’ But instead I let my eyes meet theirs in an almost plea for a change in what has become our society.

I am personally of the belief that no transgender person wants to cause trouble in a bathroom. People just want to use the restroom. There have been terrible acts happening in public restrooms long before this. This is why my children never use a public restroom without me. You don’t have to agree with me & I don’t have to agree with you. It’s ok.

Persons undergoing cancer treatment or post cancer treatment may lack hair & wear a baseball hat. They may have undergone a mastectomy like myself. Please consider these things. Rant over.

To view the original article CLICK HERE

Regards,
Greg_L-W.

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Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins
tel: 44 (0)1594 – 528 337
Calls from ‘Number Withheld’ phones Are Blocked

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  9. I Regret due to BT in this area I have a rubbish Broadband connection
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11 Days To Shrink Or Destroy Breast Cancer

11 Days To Shrink Or Destroy Breast Cancer
.

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 .

Breast Cancer Trial Kills Tumours In 11 Days

Around a quarter of women given a combined treatment of drugs in a clinical study saw their tumours shrink or disappear.

08:01, UK,Friday 11 March 2016

Breast cancer chemotherapy research

A consultant analysing a mammogram. (File Pic)

Using Herceptin together with another powerful breast cancer drug before surgery could shrink or destroy tumours in just 11 days, a study has found.

Some patients may be spared chemotherapy if they are given a combination of the drugs Tyverb (lapatinib) and Herceptin (trastuzumab) immediately after diagnosis, according to the research by a team of British doctors.

The medics, who presented their study to experts at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Amsterdam, said their findings had “groundbreaking potential”.

Some 257 women with an aggressive form of cancer – HER2 – were involved in the clinical trial and either received no treatment, one of the drugs or a combination of them.

Around a quarter of the women on the combined treatment saw their tumours shrink or disappear.

Trial co-leader Professor Judith Bliss, from the Institute of Cancer Research in London, said it was “unexpected to see quite such dramatic responses to the trastuzumab and lapatinib within 11 days”.

She added: “Our results are a strong foundation on which to build further trials of combination anti-HER2 therapies prior to surgery – which could reduce the number of women who require subsequent chemotherapy, which is also very effective but can lead to long-term side effects.”

At present, women usually have their tumour removed during surgery followed by a combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormonal therapies and targeted drugs such as Herceptin.

Professor Arnie Purushotham, senior clinical adviser at Cancer Research UK, which funded the study, said: “These results are very promising if they stand up in the long run and could be the starting step of finding a new way to treat HER2 positive breast cancers.”

Around 5,300 to 8,000 women a year are diagnosed with HER2 positive breast cancer.

To view the original article CLICK HERE
.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
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A Grim Breast Cancer Milestone for Black Women

Posted by: Greg Lance – Watkins
(Greg_L-W)

.
A Grim Breast Cancer Milestone for Black Women
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving my wife Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.

Hi,

.

A Grim Breast Cancer Milestone
for Black Women

By TARA PARKER-POPE OCTOBER 29, 2015 10:00 AM October 29, 2015 10:00 am 20 Comments
Debrah Reid, 59, center, in 2013, relaxed with her sister, Audrey Anderson, left, and friend Travia Davis, at her home in Memphis. Ms. Reid was given a breast cancer diagnosis in 2013 and was featured in an article on racial disparities in breast cancer that year. Ms. Reid died in May 2015 from the disease.
Debrah Reid, 59, center, in 2013, relaxed with her sister, Audrey Anderson, left, and friend Travia Davis, at her home in Memphis. Ms. Reid was given a breast cancer diagnosis in 2013 and was featured in an article on racial disparities in breast cancer that year. Ms. Reid died in May 2015 from the disease.
Credit Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

African-American women in the United States have reached a dubious milestone. For the first time, the incidence of breast cancer among black women is equal to that of white women, according to a sweeping new report from the American Cancer Society.

The finding is worrisome because breast cancer has historically been more deadly in black women than in white women, but at least it has not been as common. Now, as incidence rates equalize, the data suggest that breast cancer will continue to exact a far greater toll on black women, and that the trend shows no sign of abating.

“It’s been known that white women are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, but black women are more likely to die from it,” said Carol E. DeSantis, senior epidemiologist at the American Cancer Society and the lead author of the report. “Now what happens? Now the incidence rates are similar, and black women are still more likely to die from it. Our conclusion is that the widening mortality disparity is likely to continue, especially now in light of the increasing incidence.”

The data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program of the National Cancer Institute, a program that has been collecting information on cancer patients since 1973.

Among white women breast cancer incidence rates have been stable since 2004, hovering around 135 per 100,000 women. But among black women, rates have been consistently lower, ranging from 119 to 125 per 100,000. But in 2012, a startling change occurred. The incidence rate moved to 135 cases per 100,000 women for both white and black women.

“The lines have crossed for the first time,” Ms. DeSantis said. “There is variation in year-to-year rates, especially in smaller populations such as in black women, but I think, overall, the picture we’ve seen is this slow steady increase in black women and stable rates in white women.”

While it’s possible that a fraction of the rise could be attributed to earlier detection, that would not fully explain the trend because rates at which women are being screened for breast cancer have remained stable. As a result, the trends suggest that the uptick in incidence is not a result of doctors simply finding more cases of breast cancer, but is probably the result of other factors.

“To me the bottom line of these statistics is the evidence that the health disparity between African-American and white women in the U.S. is still going strong,” said Kirsten Moysich, a professor of oncology at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, N.Y. “And it’s even more pronounced than previously reported.”

Researchers say the reasons behind the increase are likely to be complex, but rising obesity rates among African-American women may explain some of it. Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancers, and much of the increase in breast cancers among black women has been due largely to more cases of this type of tumor. The obesity rate in black women was 58 percent during the 2009 to 2012 period, up from 39 percent from 1999 to 2002. Meanwhile, the obesity rate among white women has stabilized at around 33 percent.

Researchers also believe that changes in reproductive patterns may play a role, as more African-American women delay childbirth and have fewer children. Both are recognized risk factors for breast cancer.

Over all, the report painted a grim picture of the state of breast cancer in African-American women, showing that advances in diagnosis and treatment that have dramatically improved survival rates from breast cancer and saved countless lives have largely bypassed African-American women. By virtually every measure of the disease — age of diagnosis, age of death, stage of diagnosis — black women are at a significant disadvantage compared with white women, the data show.

Black women are given breast cancer diagnoses at younger ages and die from the disease at younger ages than white women, suggesting that the disease may exact a greater economic and family toll on the black community by stealing more of a woman’s most productive years. The median age at diagnosis is 58 for black women and 62 for white women. The median age for breast cancer death is 62 for black women and 68 for white women.

Black women also are less likely than white women are to be given a diagnosis of early stage disease, and more likely to be given a diagnosis with later stage, and less treatable, tumors, according to the report.

Compared with white women, black women were more likely to be found to have an aggressive form of the disease called triple negative breast cancer, which has a poorer prognosis, in part, because there are not targeted therapies to treat it. Triple negative breast cancers account for 22 percent of the cases among black women, and 11 percent among white women.

Black women also lag behind white women in diagnosis of estrogen-receptor positive disease, the most treatable form of breast cancer. Among white women, 76 percent of cancers diagnosed are ER positive, compared with 62 percent in black women.

Over all, a black woman given a breast cancer diagnosis is 42 percent more likely to die from the disease than a white woman with breast cancer. An analysis of breast cancer mortality trends in 41 of the largest cities in the United States, published last year in Cancer Epidemiology, found that in some cities the risk is even greater. In Los Angeles, a black woman with breast cancer is about 70 percent more likely to die from the disease than a white woman is. In Memphis, black women face more than double the risk.

Researchers say the racial divide in breast cancer mortality may be due to a combination of factors, including disparities in the quality of care available to black women, who may have less access to quality screening and treatment, compared to white women. Lower rates of follow-up after a mammogram, cultural distrust of doctors, and lack of insurance coverage among black women may also play a role.

Dr. Moysich said she hopes the data will galvanize the African-American community and the medical community in general to push for more research.

“There are a lot of people really trying to figure this out on an epidemiological basis and molecular basis and behavioral basis, but we haven’t put our finger on it,’’ she said. “There are lots of partial explanations, and this is a question a lot of people are working on, but it still confuses us.”

To view the original of this article CLICK HERE

TIMES DOCUMENTARIES By Stephen Maing 11:51
The Cancer Divide: Mary
Video: http://vp.nyt.com/video/2013/12/22/25112_1_breast-cancer-memphis_wg_720p.mp4
The Cancer Divide: Mary
Mary Singleton, 57, learned in July that she had Stage 4 breast cancer. After the diagnosis her son, George, moved home to Memphis to help take care of her and to help run her printing business. By Stephen Maing on Publish Date December 20, 2013.

.

Regards,
     Greg_L-W
Greg Lance-Watkins

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Later in the sequence of my experiences with cancer you will note that I introduce some results and events most probably linked with cancer such as enlarged & damaged Prostate and a consequential Heart Attack leaving me with no right coronary artery!
.
I have also included numerous articles and anecdotes regarding health – primarily related to cancer, prostate and heart conditions – FYI!
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help you in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337

of: Stroat, Gloucestershire, UK http://stroat-gloucestershire.com
eMail: Greg_L-W@BTconnect.com

Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE

Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com

DO MAKE USE of:
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Victoria Derbyshire Has Her Mastectomy & Reconstruction

Victoria Derbyshire Has Her Mastectomy & Reconstruction
.

 Please Be Sure To

& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide

To Give Hope & Information

 .

Victoria Derbyshire’s breast cancer diary

  • 12 October 2015
  • From the section Health
Media captionVictoria Derbyshire: “Today I had a mastectomy. I feel all right, I can’t believe it”

The BBC journalist and presenter Victoria Derbyshire was diagnosed with breast cancer in July, and had a mastectomy last month. She decided to record a diary with her thoughts after surgery to try to help demystify the treatment.

“The word cancer has such a chilling effect on people, me included, but I’ve learned over the past few weeks that this illness doesn’t have to be elevated to some uber-powerful status. It’s simply an illness that the NHS treat with expertise and care,” she says in the video.

Derbyshire, 47, was diagnosed with lobular breast cancer, which means it develops in the lobes of the breast and spreads to surrounding tissue – some 10% of breast cancers are this type.

She had a mastectomy on 24 September at Ashford Hospital in Surrey, part of the Ashford and St Peter’s Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

“Today I had a mastectomy. I feel all right, I can’t believe it,” she says in her hospital bed, just hours after the operation.

“When I woke up from the anaesthetic I did cry. It was just relief, such a relief. The malignant tumour in my right breast is gone, two or three lymph nodes are gone,” she explains.

“Three lymph nodes were taken away as they had tiny, tiny, bits of cancerous cells, so they took them out and will analyse that tissue, and that will guide the medical professionals in terms of whether I end up having radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy.”

‘So inspiring’

Derbyshire praises the treatment she has received from NHS staff, describing it as “awesome”. “They are so inspiring and caring and I feel so grateful to them,” she adds.

She says she’s in some pain, but not much, as it’s being controlled by painkillers. “It feels like someone has punched me in the right-hand side, but it’s not the end of the world, it’s really not.

“It reminds me of, if you’ve got boys and you’re playing football with them and they tackle you a bit too hard and run into you, bash you because they don’t realise your chest is so sensitive. It’s just achy and dull and not searing by any stretch of the imagination.”


Watch Victoria’s diary in full here.


Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK – one in eight women will be diagnosed with it. It’s the second most common cause of death from cancer in women in the UK.

But more than 85% of people survive breast cancer beyond five years.

Derbyshire says her personal approach to it has been very upbeat as well as pragmatic.

Victoria Derbyshire five days after her operation

Image caption Five days later, Derbyshire says she’s not in very much pain
“Everyone who’s diagnosed with cancer, I’ve learned, has a different story, a different experience and a different way of approaching it. I, for what it’s worth, don’t feel like I’m battling cancer, I don’t feel that I’m fighting cancer, I am simply being treated for cancer,” she explains.

“The reason why I wanted to talk about what happened to me is because I’m a pretty open person, but also because more than one in three people will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lifetime and here’s the thing – having cancer is manageable, it can be manageable. Having a mastectomy is totally doable. I didn’t know those things until I got cancer. And that’s what I want to tell people.

“I know everyone’s different when they’re diagnosed – every cancer is different, everyone has a different experience, but that’s mine and I hope you don’t mind me sharing it with you.”

‘Really positive’

Derbyshire left hospital the day after the operation, and, in an update recorded five days later in the park with her puppy Gracie, she says she’s not in very much pain unless she accidentally pulls herself sharply.

“I’m restricted in my movement – I’m up and about, I can walk, but I can’t really use my right-hand side. I couldn’t lift a book, or a laptop, I can’t hold a shower head to wash my hair or use my right hand to brush my teeth, so that’s slightly frustrating but it’s not the end of the world,” she explains.

After receiving results from the tissue removed from her during the operation, Derbyshire has been told she needs radiotherapy and chemotherapy. She will have it in the coming months and will present her programme as much as she can during her treatment. She’s next back on air on 20 October.

“I’m not worried about that as the cancer is out of me, it’s gone. That’s just the next part of the treatment, the next part of the process. And in this whole process I haven’t actually felt ill once, and it’s bizarre,” she says.

“I feel really positive, I’ve got no reason not to feel positive. My over-riding emotion is that I have to make sure that this cancer doesn’t come back.”

Macmillan and Breast Cancer Care were consulted during the making of the diary.

To view the original article just CLICK HERE

More stories

  • Video Elizabeth Hurley on breast cancer awareness campaign CLICK HERE
    9 October 2015
  • Breast cancer treatment: Drug pertuzumab licensed CLICK HERE
    29 September 2015
  • Genetic clue to breast cancer relapses CLICK HERE
    25 September 2015

Related Internet links

  • Breast Cancer Care – The breast cancer support charity CLICK HERE
  • Macmillan Cancer Support CLICK HERE
.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

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Early-Stage Breast Condition – May Not Require Cancer Treatment!

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Early-Stage Breast Condition
May Not Require Cancer Treatment

By GINA KOLATAAUG. 20, 2015

Therese Taylor of Mississauga, Ontario, had a mastectomy four years ago
after a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ.
She now believes it was unnecessary.
Credit Michelle Siu for The New York Times

As many as 60,000 American women each year are told they have a very early stage of breast cancer — Stage 0, as it is commonly known — a possible precursor to what could be a deadly tumor. And almost every one of the women has either a lumpectomy or a mastectomy, and often a double mastectomy, removing a healthy breast as well.

Yet it now appears that treatment may make no difference in their outcomes. Patients with this condition had close to the same likelihood of dying of breast cancer as women in the general population, and the few who died did so despite treatment, not for lack of it, researchers reported Thursday in JAMA Oncology.

Picture Your Life: Faces of Breast Cancer
A radiologist uses a magnifying glass to check mammograms for breast cancer.
Well: Scientists Seek to Rein In Diagnoses of Cancer JULY 29, 2013
Essay: Cancer by Any Other Name Would Not Be as Terrifying NOV. 21, 2011
A year after Monica Long’s partial mastectomy, a pathologist determined that she never had cancer.
Prone to Error: Earliest Steps to Find Cancer JULY 19, 2010

Their conclusions were based on the most extensive collection of data ever analyzed on the condition, known as ductal carcinoma in situ, or D.C.I.S.: 100,000 women followed for 20 years. The findings are likely to fan debate about whether tens of thousands of patients are undergoing unnecessary and sometimes disfiguring treatments for premalignant conditions that are unlikely to develop into life-threatening cancers.

We asked our readers to share insights from their experiences with breast cancer. Here are some of their stories.

Diagnoses of D.C.I.S., involving abnormal cells confined to the milk ducts of the breast, have soared in recent decades. They now account for as much as a quarter of cancer diagnoses made with mammography, as radiologists find smaller and smaller lesions. But the new data on outcomes raises provocative questions: Is D.C.I.S. cancer, a precursor to the disease or just a risk factor for some women? Is there any reason for most patients with the diagnosis to receive brutal therapies? If treatment does not make a difference, should women even be told they have the condition?

Dr. Otis W. Brawley, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society, said he was not ready to abandon treatment until a large clinical trial is done that randomly assigns women to receive mastectomies, lumpectomies or no treatment for D.C.I.S., and that shows treatment is unnecessary for most patients. But Dr. Brawley, who was not involved in the study, also said he had no doubt that treatment had been excessive.

“In medicine, we have a tendency to get too enthusiastic about a technique and overuse it,” Dr. Brawley said. “This has happened with the treatment of D.C.I.S.”

A majority of the 100,000 patients in the database the researchers used, from a national cancer registry, had lumpectomies, and nearly all the rest had mastectomies, the new study found. Their chance of dying of breast cancer in the two decades after treatment was 3.3 percent, no matter which procedure they had, about the same as an average woman’s chance of dying of breast cancer, said Dr. Laura J. Esserman, a breast cancer surgeon and researcher at the University of California, San Francisco, who wrote an editorial accompanying the study.

The data showed that some patients were at higher risk: those younger than 40, black women, and those whose abnormal cells had molecular markers found in advanced cancers with poorer prognoses.

D.C.I.S. has long been regarded as a precursor to potentially deadly invasive cancers, analogous to colon polyps that can turn into colon cancer, said Dr. Steven A. Narod, the lead author of the paper and a researcher at Women’s College Research Institute in Toronto. The treatment strategy has been to get rid of the tiny specks of abnormal breast cells, just as doctors get rid of colon polyps when they see them in a colonoscopy.

But if that understanding of the condition had played out as expected, women who had an entire breast removed, or even both breasts as a sort of double precaution, should have been protected from invasive breast cancer. Instead, the findings showed, they had the same risk as those who had a lumpectomy. Almost no women went untreated, so it is not clear if as a group, they did worse.

But some women who died of breast cancer ended up with the disease throughout their body without ever having it recur in their breast — many, in fact, had no breast because they had had a mastectomy. Those very rare fatal cases of D.C.I.S. followed by fatal breast cancer, Dr. Narod concluded, had most likely already spread at the time of detection. As for the rest, he said, they were never going to spread anyway.

Dr. Esserman said that if deadly breast cancers started out as D.C.I.S., the incidence of invasive breast cancers should have plummeted with rising detection rates. That has not happened, even though in the pre-mammography era, before about 1980, the number of women found to have D.C.I.S. was only in the hundreds. Nearly 240,000 women receive diagnoses of invasive breast cancer each year.

Those facts lead Dr. Narod to a blunt view. After a surgeon has removed the aberrant cells for the biopsy, he said, “I think the best way to treat D.C.I.S. is to do nothing.”

Others drew back from that advice.

Dr. Monica Morrow, chief breast cancer surgeon at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, said it made more sense to view D.C.I.S. as a cancer precursor that should be treated the way it is now, with a lumpectomy or mastectomy. She questioned whether those women who were treated and ended up dying of breast cancer anyway had been misdiagnosed.

In some cases, pathologists look at only a small amount of tumor, Dr. Morrow said, and could have missed areas of invasive cancer. Even the best mastectomy leaves cells behind, she added, which could explain why a small number of women with D.C.I.S. who had mastectomies, even double mastectomies, died of breast cancer.

USPSTF data pointed to this lack of efficacy a YEAR AGO! And the published their findings and the media yawned, and the women’s groups…
Barry 7 minutes ago

A representative of the American Association of Cancer Surgeons responded, “But … But … But, how are we going to make our mortgage…
transposition 8 minutes ago

This finding is consistent with the growing body of evidence that our approach to breast cancer has been too aggressive, particularly when…

Dr. Brawley said the new study, by showing which D.C.I.S. patients were at highest risk, would help enormously in defining who might benefit from treatment. It could not show that the high-risk women — young, black or with tumors with ominous molecular markers — were helped by treatment because there were too few of them, and pretty much every one of them was treated. But Dr. Brawley said he would like to see clinical trials that addressed that question, as well as whether the rest of the women with D.C.I.S., 80 percent of them, would be fine without treatment or with anti-estrogen drugs like tamoxifen or raloxifene that can reduce overall breast cancer risk.

The notion that most women with D.C.I.S. might not need mastectomies or lumpectomies can be agonizing for those, like Therese Taylor of Mississauga, Ontario, who have already gone through such treatment. Four years ago, when she was 51, a doctor sent her for a mammogram, telling her he felt a lump in her right breast. That breast was fine, but it turned out she had D.C.I.S. in her left breast. A surgeon, she said, told her that “it was consistent with cancer” and that she should have a mastectomy.

“I went into a state of shock and fear,” Ms. Taylor said. She had the surgery.She regrets it. “It takes away your feeling of attractiveness,” she said. “Compared to women who really have cancer, it is nothing. But the mastectomy was for no reason, and that’s why it bothers me.”

But if D.C.I.S. is actually a risk factor for invasive cancer, rather than a precursor, it might be possible to help women reduce their risk, perhaps with hormonal or immunological therapies to change the breast environment, making it less hospitable to cancer cells, Dr. Esserman said.

“As we learn more, that gives us the courage to try something different,” she said.

The stakes in this debate are high. Karuna Jaggar, executive director of Breast Cancer Action, an education and activist organization, said women tended not to appreciate the harms of overtreatment and often overestimated their risk of dying of cancer, making them react with terror.

“Treatment comes with short- and long-term impacts,” Ms. Jaggar said, noting that women who get cancer treatment are less likely to be employed several years later and tend to earn less than before. There are emotional tolls and strains on relationships. And there can be complications from breast cancer surgery, including lymphedema, a permanent pooling of lymphatic fluid in the arm.

“These are not theoretical harms,” Ms. Jaggar said.

To view the original article CLICK HERE
.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

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Statins Shown To Control Some Cancers

Statins Shown To Control Some Cancers.

 Please Be Sure To

& Link to my My Blogs
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Statins slash risk of death by cancer: They slow tumour growth by up to 50% reveal major studies

  • Experts say there is ‘overwhelming’ evidence that statins can treat cancer
  • Study showed they cut death rates for bone cancer patients by 55 per cent
  • GPs should make patients aware of pills’ new benefits, researchers say
Experts say there is now 'overwhelming' evidence that statins, which were designed to fight heart attacks and strokes, can be effective against cancer

Experts say there is now ‘overwhelming’ evidence that statins, which were designed to fight heart attacks and strokes, can be effective against cancer

Taking statins can cut your risk of dying from cancer by up to 50 per cent, two major studies have shown.

While the drugs do not seem to prevent cancer in the first place, it is believed they boost survival rates by slowing the rate at which tumours grow. 

Experts say the evidence is overwhelming that, as well preventing heart attacks and strokes, statins can be as effective at fighting cancer as conventional treatments such as chemotherapy.

A study involving almost 150,000 women found those taking statins, whether initially healthy or not, were 22 per cent less likely to die from any form of cancer than those not on the drugs.

But this effect varied between the different types of the disease. For breast cancer, statins reduced death rates by 40 per cent, for ovarian by 42 per cent and bowel by 43 per cent. 

For bone cancer, which is rarer, death rates were cut by more than half – 55 per cent. 

A separate study on 22,110 men with prostate cancer found that those who happened to be taking statins were 43 per cent less likely to die from the illness.

Researchers say GPs should make patients aware of the cancer-fighting benefits of the pills as it may sway their decision to start taking them.

Around seven million adults in Britain take statins – the most commonly prescribed drugs in the UK – to lower cholesterol levels. 

They cost just 3p a day and work by stopping the accumulation on blood vessel walls of cholesterol deposits which trigger heart attacks and strokes.

Last summer, the NHS issued new guidance saying the pills should offered to 17million adults – 40 per cent of the population – on the basis they could save up to 2,000 lives a year. 

There is growing evidence that statins may also reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. 

But many doctors are suspicious about their long-term safety and say drugs firms have downplayed their side effects, which affect one in ten and include nosebleeds, muscle pain, a sore throat and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

Nonetheless two studies presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology conference in Chicago, one from Yale University in Connecticut and the other from Rutgers University in New Jersey, show statins may help prevent cancer.

For breast cancer (pictured), statins reduced death rates by 40 per cent, for ovarian by 42 per cent and bowel by 43 per cent. For bone cancer, which is rarer, death rates were cut by more than half 

Researchers believe that, by reducing cholesterol, the pills also lower the levels of certain hormones – androgens – which encourage tumour growth. 

As well as being rendered less aggressive, the tumours are less likely to return, they say. So if someone who is taking statins gets cancer, they are more likely to survive.

Professor Noel Clarke of the Christie NHS hospital in Manchester, which specialises in treating cancer, said GPs should discuss statins with patients at high risk of cancer.

‘The balance of evidence says that statins have an anti-cancer effect,’ he said. ‘Therefore if someone is in a situation where there is increased risk of cancer, be it prostate cancer or breast, then a discussion could be had about the risks and benefits of statins. ’

GPs are being urged to make patients aware of the cancer-fighting properties of the pills, but some family doctors are concerned by the side effects

In the Yale study, researchers looked at the records of 146,326 women aged 50 to 79 over a 15-year period. 

Those taking statins were on average 22 per cent less likely to die from any form of cancer, regardless of how long they had been on the drugs.

Ange Wang, of the Stanford University School of Medicine said: ‘We’re definitely very excited by these results.’ 

Referring to whether GPs should prescribe statins for cancer prevention, she added: ‘I think it should be a priority, given how common statins are.’

The Rutgers study showed that men with prostate cancer were 42 per cent less likely to die from the disease if they were taking either statins or metformin –a diabetes drug.

Lead researcher Grace Lu-Yao said tests on rats had shown that taking statins and metformin were as effective as the common chemotherapy drug docetaxel in treating prostate cancer.

Despite the benefits of statins, a number of leading doctors and academics oppose prescribing them widely to healthy adults because of possible long-term side effects.

Recently a professor who had advocated widespread use of statins announced he was carrying out a review into their safety.

Sir Rory Collins of Oxford University is to examine the records of tens of thousands of patients to establish how many may have suffered side effects.

Six of the 12 experts who drew-up NHS guidance on the drugs have received funding from firms that manufacture statins.

SCREEN WOMEN IN THEIR 30s FOR BREAST CANCER GENE, EXPERTS SAY 

Women in their 30s should be offered screening to assess their risk of breast cancer, experts say.

They are calling for the NHS to offer simple blood tests to identify genetic faults that increase the likelihood of the disease. 

Around one woman in 400 carries mutations in her BRCA1 or 2 genes that increase their risk of breast or ovarian cancer by up to 90 per cent.

Actress Angelina Jolie, 39, chose to have her breasts and ovaries removed because her chances of getting cancer were so high. 

Researchers say women should be offered a simple blood test to examine whether they carry the BRCA1 or 2 genes that increase their risk of breast or ovarian cancer by up to 90 per cent (file image)

Researchers say women should be offered a simple blood test to examine whether they carry the BRCA1 or 2 genes that increase their risk of breast or ovarian cancer by up to 90 per cent (file image)

But many women are unaware they carry these genes. Researchers say the current system, which relies on GPs referring women for tests if they have a family history of cancer, at best identifies less than two in three.

About 80 per cent of women with the genes will go on to develop breast cancer – there are 2,200 such cases in the UK each year. 

The illness usually develops in their 30s and 40s and about half die because tumours are very aggressive.

Dr Elizabeth Swisher, professor of medical genetics at Washington University in Seattle, said routine NHS screening for women in their 30s was a ‘no brainer.’

But NICE, the NHS rationing body, is unlikely to see it as cost-effective to offer the tests, which would cost around £200 a time to all women.

However Dr Swisher, who yesterday led a debate at the American Society for Clinical Oncology conference, said: ‘It would definitely save lives. Not only are they aggressive cancers, they are early onset so you have a lot of years of life to save.’

To view the original article CLICK HERE

.

.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

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