Life's Roller Coaster

If I'm missing, or not taking messages sorry – I'm more angry about letting my friends down than YOU will ever be at being let down! Unfortunately that is sometimes a side effect of Cancer! Mea Culpa: may I blame being short fused & grumpy on it too! My first symptoms presented in Nov-1998 – Follow The Trail on >DIARY of CANCER< Immediately Below!

An Even Lower Systolic Pressure May Further Reduce Strokes & Heart Attacks

An Even Lower Systolic Pressure May Further Reduce Strokes & Heart Attacks
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Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins – Greg_L-W.

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Hi,

Data on Benefits of Lower Blood Pressure Brings Clarity for Doctors and Patients

By GINA KOLATANOV. 9, 2015 

Dr. Marc Alan Pfeffer, a cardiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and professor of medicine at Harvard, said he would now feel obligated to help patients lower their blood pressure even further after the results of a federal study. Credit Charlie Mahoney for The New York TimesWhen the federal government announced in September that it had abruptly halted a large blood pressure study because its results were so compelling, doctors were left in frustrating limbo.The announcement said researchers had found that driving systolic blood pressure to levels far below what current guidelines recommend — less than 120 instead of 140 or 150 millimeters of mercury — can save lives and prevent heart disease and strokes. But they declined to release any data on the number of lives saved, the number of heart attacks prevented or other critical measures.

“How can anyone do anything different tomorrow with regard to blood pressure control without knowing more about what they found?” asked Dr. Harlan Krumholz, a cardiologist at Yale, echoing the concerns of other specialists.

On Monday, reporting at an American Heart Association meeting in Orlando, Fla., and in a paper published simultaneously in The New England Journal of Medicine, study investigators lifted the veil. Among the 9,361 hypertension patients followed for an average of 3.2 years, there were 26 percent fewer deaths (155 compared with 210) and 38 percent fewer cases of heart failure (62 compared with 100) among patients who achieved the systolic pressure target of 120 than among those who achieved the current 140 target.

Systolic pressure is the higher of the two blood pressure numbers and represents pressure on blood vessels when the heart contracts.

Over all, there was a 24 percent reduction — 243 compared with 319 — in people who had a heart attack, heart failure or stroke or died from heart disease, Dr. Paul K. Whelton, a principal investigator for the study, said.

The older participants did just as well as younger ones.

For millions of Americans with high blood pressure, the results could be transforming, said Dr. Marc Alan Pfeffer, a cardiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston who was not affiliated with the study.

Before now, Dr. Pfeffer said, if a patient over 50 years old with high cholesterol or another well-controlled risk factor for heart disease came into his office with systolic pressure of 136 he would pat the patient on the back and say, “Great job.” Now, he said, he would feel obligated to give the patient more hypertension drugs. Otherwise, he said, “I would have lost the opportunity to help another human being.”

MENDING HEARTS: GINA KOLATA ON PROGRESS AND CHALLENGES IN HEART DISEASE

  • Lower Blood Pressure Guidelines Could Be ‘Lifesaving,’ Federal Study SaysSEP. 12, 2015
  • A Possibly Lifesaving Guide to Heart AttacksJUNE 23, 2015
  • Blood Pressure, the Mystery NumberJUNE 23, 2015
  • Putting Stents to the TestJUNE 23, 2015
  • Building a Better ValveJUNE 22, 2015
  • A Sea Change in Treating Heart AttacksJUNE 21, 2015

RELATED COVERAGE
Well: 3 Things to Know About the Sprint Blood Pressure Trial NOV. 9, 2015

Jackson T. Wright Jr., a blood pressure expert at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center as well as a Sprint study investigator, said changing blood pressure guidelines could cause the falling death rate from heart attacks and stroke to drop even more.

Lower Blood Pressure Guidelines Could Be ‘Lifesaving,’ Federal Study Says SEPT. 11, 2015Glenn Lorenzen at church in Weymouth, Mass., in 2014.

He has had two heart attacks, and his systolic blood pressure, once above 200, is now 124.Mending Hearts: Blood Pressure, the Mystery Number JUNE 22, 2015

At least 17 million Americans will be affected by the findings right now, calculated Paul Muntner, an epidemiologist at the University of Alabama who was not affiliated with the study.

The study, called Sprint, enrolled patients ages 50 and older with high blood pressure. The patients also had at least one other risk factor for heart disease like smoking or a high cholesterol level, or they had kidney disease, or they were simply over the age of 75.

Half were assigned to a systolic pressure target below 140, in keeping with today’s medical practice. The rest were assigned a target pressure of less than 120.

The study was supposed to continue until 2017, but ended abruptly last summer when researchers announced they already had “potentially lifesaving” results.Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

Doctors have long wrestled with how low blood pressure should go.

Bringing it too far down, particularly in elderly people, can result in complications like dizziness and fainting. According to the results released Monday, about 5 percent of the study’s patients, or 220 people, with the 120 blood pressure target had serious complications over the course of the study — blood pressure so low it caused severe dizziness or fainting, or a reversible injury to the kidneys.

Among those with the 140 target, 118 had serious complications.
A complication the investigators worried about with blood pressures of 120 or lower — an abrupt drop in blood pressure when people stood up — actually occurred more often in those with the higher systolic pressure target.
“When we put those complications in the context of a 27 percent reduction in total mortality, it seems that the benefits outweigh the risks,” said David M. Reboussin, a biostatistician at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and a principal investigator for the study.
What is most remarkable, researchers said, is that the improvements in death rates and rates of heart attacks occurred on top of improvements these patients already experienced as their blood pressures fell to 140.
To get their systolic pressures to 120, patients took an average of one additional blood pressure drug — 2.8 pills instead of 1.8.
Almost all blood pressure pills are inexpensive and available as generics.
It is now up to committees that formulate national guidelines to decide how to change their recommendations. Dr. Whelton, chairman of the heart association’s guidelines committee, said his group would meet on Monday night to consider the new data.
One issue is what to tell patients with diabetes, who were not included in this study.
A previous, much smaller study with diabetics that tested stringent blood sugar control along with a blood pressure of 120 found no reduction in heart attacks or deaths.
But many researchers are not convinced that the study, called Accord, proved that lower systolic pressure failed to help people with diabetes, because it was so much smaller and because blood sugar control was also being tested.
William Dougherty, 77, has a family history of heart disease.
With medication, his systolic pressure is reliably under 140.
Credit Charlie Mahoney for The New York Times
RECENT COMMENTS
Wait, they did all this with drugs? What about diet? What about exercise?
Smartysmom Oh my, article doesn’t mention the next steps in dizzy and fainting, which is falls and broken hips which is typically a death sentence for…
Eh Watson Well, if Martin Shkreli is reading this article, you can bet that blood pressure meds will soon cost $7,000 per pill.
Continue reading the main story:
Another question is what to advise people under age 50 and those over 50 with no risk factors other than high blood pressure.
“That will be a judgment call,” said Dr. Jackson T. Wright Jr., a study investigator who also is on the guidelines committee and who directs the hypertension program at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland.
There also is the unanswered question of how low blood pressure should go.
A few patients in the new study lowered their systolic pressure to 110, but getting it below 120 was a challenge for most people.
Dr. Wright said it was almost inconceivable that there would be another large study comparing, say, a pressure of 110 to one of 120. “That is a very narrow window,” he said, and the expected differences in outcomes would be small, meaning the study would have to be very large and prolonged.
Even if the guidelines end up recommending a goal of less than 120 only for people like those in the study, doctors will face a challenge, said Dr. Aram V. Chobanian of Boston University Medical Center, who wrote a commentary in The New England Journal of Medicine.
A third to half of all patients fail to meet even the current blood pressure goals of 140 to 150.Some hypertension experts urge caution. Dr. Michael Alderman, a blood pressure expert at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, calculated that the study results mean six people per 1,000 annually would avoid a heart attack, stroke, or heart failure.
That, he said, can make it difficult to know how to advise individual patients.“If there were no, or minimal, harms like a safe one-time vaccination, it would be a no-brainer,” Dr. Alderman said. “But if it means decades-long pill taking by generally healthy folks, the decision gets more difficult.”
Dr. Krumholz of Yale said that while the study results were exciting, a lower blood pressure should not be seen as a mandate.
Getting pressure that low, he said, “comes at some risk.” Doctors will have to talk to patients about their preferences and goals, he said.
Dr. Pfeffer said the next challenge was to have these discussions with patients, but he said he was ready to start recommending a goal of less than 120 to appropriate motivated patients.
One of his patients, William Dougherty, 77, is ready. Mr. Dougherty, who lives in Boston, says he is healthy and his blood pressure has been controlled with one pill so it is reliably under 140. But he has a family history of heart disease, and that scares him.
“I will do anything if it lowers my risk of stroke or heart attacks,” he said. “Those are my biggest fears at my age.” 
To view the original article CLICK HERE.
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Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in Nov-1997 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

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The Value Of Controlling Blood Pressure In Early Life

The Value Of Controlling Blood Pressure In Early Life
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Keeping Blood Pressure Low in Those Under 50

Higher blood pressure in young adulthood increases the risk for coronary heart disease, a new study found.

Researchers followed almost 3,500 men and women for 25 years with periodic physical examinations beginning in 1985, when all were healthy and 18 to 30 years old. They calculated their cumulative exposure to high blood pressure over the years.

The scientists, writing in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology, studied left ventricular dysfunction — damage to the part of the heart that pumps blood to the entire body except the lungs. Left ventricle impairment is a main cause of heart failure. They found the higher the blood pressure, the greater the damage to the left ventricle. In addition, even after adjusting for other risk factors, chronic high blood pressure in young adulthood increased coronary calcium in middle age to a degree similar to that of the initial stages of atherosclerosis.

“This paper highlights that in the first half of adult life, it’s very important to keep blood pressure as low as one can,” said the lead author, Dr. João A.C. Lima, a professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins, adding that “130/80 or 130/70 should be the goal for people under 50.”

Current guidelines advise treatment at 140/90 for people ages 30 to 59.

To view the original of this article CLICK HERE

Cumulative Blood Pressure in Early Adulthood and Cardiac Dysfunction in Middle AgeThe CARDIA Study

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Satoru Kishi, MD; Gisela Teixido-Tura, MD, PhD; Hongyan Ning, MD; Bharath Ambale Venkatesh, PhD; Colin Wu, PhD§; Andre Almeida, MD; Eui-Young Choi, MD; Ola Gjesdal, MD; David R. Jacobs, Jr., PhD; Pamela J. Schreiner, PhD; Samuel S. Gidding, MD; Kiang Liu, PhD; João A.C. Lima, MD
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2015;65(25):2679-2687. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2015.04.042
 

Abstract

Background  Cumulative blood pressure (BP) exposure may adversely influence myocardial function, predisposing individuals to heart failure later in life.

Objectives  This study sought to investigate how cumulative exposure to higher BP influences left ventricular (LV) function during young to middle adulthood.

Methods  The CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study prospectively enrolled 5,115 healthy African Americans and whites in 1985 and 1986 (baseline). At the year 25 examination, LV function was measured by 2-dimensional echocardiography; cardiac deformation was assessed in detail by speckle-tracking echocardiography. We used cumulative exposure of BP through baseline and up to the year 25 examination (millimeters of mercury × year) to represent long-term exposure to BP levels. Linear regression and logistic regression were used to quantify the association of BP measured repeatedly through early adulthood (18 to 30 years of age) up to middle age (43 to 55 years).

Results  Among 2,479 participants, cumulative BP measures were not related to LV ejection fraction; however, high cumulative exposure to systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were associated with lower longitudinal strain rate (both p < 0.001). For diastolic function, higher cumulative exposures to SBP and DBP were associated with low early diastolic longitudinal peak strain rate. Of note, higher DBP (per SD increment) had a stronger association with diastolic dysfunction compared with SBP.

Conclusions  Higher cumulative exposure to BP over 25 years from young adulthood to middle age is associated with incipient LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction in middle age.

Central Illustration

Early Adulthood Blood Pressure and Middle-Age Left Ventricular Function

Blood pressure (BP) trends with increasing age. The trajectory slope shows mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) with increasing age for white and black men and women. All BP measurements over 25 years were within guideline acceptable range (A and B). Systolic and diastolic function with increasing cumulative SBP and DBP. (C) For left ventricular (LV) systolic function, there were no differences in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) among cumulative SBP deciles; meanwhile, higher deciles of cumulative SBP produced a lower 4-chamber longitudinal peak systolic strain rate (Ell_SRs) compared with the lowest SBP (0% to 10%) decile. For LV diastolic function, early peak diastolic mitral velocity/peak early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E/e′) ratio increased in higher deciles of cumulative SBP compared with the lowest decile. Higher deciles of cumulative SBP were associated with lower 4-chamber longitudinal peak early diastolic strain rate (Ell_SRe) versus the lowest decile. (D) In considering cumulative DBP deciles, the same trends were seen for LVEF, as well as when comparing the higher deciles with the lowest group for Ell_SRs, E/e′ ratio, and Ell_SRe.

Perspectives

COMPETENCY IN MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE: BP in early adulthood is related to later systolic and diastolic ventricular dysfunction.

TRANSLATIONAL OUTLOOK: Further studies are needed to determine whether specific lifestyle interventions implemented to reduce DBP in early adulthood prevent HF from developing later in life.

 For more details from JACC CLICK HERE
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Regards,
Greg_L-W.
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 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
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Kidneys, Sodium, Blood Pressure & YOUR HEART!

Kidneys, Sodium, Blood Pressure & YOUR HEART!

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Hi,

I found this interesting but make of it what you will.

I tend to question the cause of my heart attack as I gave up smoking in 2001 having smoked cigars since the late 1960s. I NEVER add salt to food, we only use the bare minimum of salt in cooking, if atall.

I also do not eat junk foods – in fact there seems no reason for me to have had a heart attack – I wonder to what extent the removal of a cancerous kidney 12 years ago played a part, also did Sodium play any part in the blocking off of my right corunary artery from end to end?

Public release date: 12-Sep-2013:

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Simple steps may identify patients that hold onto excess sodium

IMAGE: Evan A. Mulloy, a second-year medical student at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University and Dr. Gregory A. Harshfield, a hypertension researcher who directs the Georgia…

Click here for more information.

Augusta, Ga. – Getting a second urine sample and blood pressure measure as patients head out of the doctor’s office appears an efficient way to identify those whose health may be in jeopardy because their bodies hold onto too much sodium, researchers report.

“We want to prove that you can easily and efficiently identify these patients,” said Evan A. Mulloy, a second-year medical student at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University. “We want this to become a part of our routine standard of care.”

Using the simple method, researchers looked at 19, 10-19 year-olds seeing a pediatric nephrologist. They found eight were sodium retainers and seven of these were already hypertensive. “Eight kids were holding onto sodium and the amounts ranged anywhere from a few milligrams to hundreds of milligrams over the course of a doctor’s visit,” Mulloy said.

The findings are featured as a poster presentation at the American Heart Association‘s High Blood Pressure Research 2013 Scientific Sessions Sept. 11-14 in New Orleans.

About 1 in 3 blacks and 1 in 5 whites retain too much sodium following stress, driving fluid retention and blood pressure levels up, said Dr. Gregory A. Harshfield, a hypertension researcher who directs the Georgia Prevention Center at GRU’s Institute of Public and Preventive Health.

Years ago, Harshfield identified this impaired ability in some blacks and wanted to take the next logical step: finding an easy, inexpensive way to identify these individuals. His studies, funded by the National Institutes of Health, have already shown sodium retainers respond well to angiotensin receptor blockers. These drugs, which reduce blood vessel constriction, are widely used to treat hypertension but, ironically, they often are considered ineffective in blacks, Harshfield said. Studies at MCG and elsewhere have shown angiotensin promotes sodium retention directly and it increases aldosterone, another hormone that enhances sodium retention.

For the new study, Mulloy recruited patients as they came into the pediatric nephology clinic at Children’s Hospital of Georgia where patients have their blood pressure taken and provide a urine sample as part of their routine visit. Those who agreed to participate had both steps repeated at the conclusion of their visit for comparison sake.

The idea was that the stress of going to the doctor would be sufficient to cull out the sodium retainers. Increased sodium retention is one way the body responds to stress but normally, as soon as the stress passes, the extra sodium gets excreted in the urine.

To be effective, they knew the method for identifying retainers had to fit easily into a regular doctor’s visit. Knowing patients are sodium retainers will go a long way in helping physicians identify optimal therapies, including prevention strategies, Mulloy said. They are now using the method in adults seeing a general internist.

“Salt sensitivity is a great concept but it’s never been implemented into the clinical arena. We think this is a measure of salt sensitivity,” Harshfield said. Nearly 31 percent of American adults are hypertensive and more than half do not have their high pressure under control, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In a related poster presentation at the AHA meeting, the MCG team also presents early evidence that potassium supplementation could help maintain a healthier sodium level following stress.

While analyzing another cohort of young healthy blacks, Harshfield and Office Associate Deborah L. Stewart noted that sodium retainers in the group still dumped potassium. Normally, potassium and sodium are dumped at the same time, Stewart said. They are writing a grant now to explore whether potassium supplementation is an inexpensive and safe method to improve sodium excretion.

Stewart, who has worked with Harshfield for a year, helping write grants, abstracts and analyze data, is completing her undergraduate degree in biology with plans to move into a role as research assistant. Mulloy has worked with Harshfield for three consecutive summers, beginning when he was an undergraduate at William & Mary.

###

 

Toni Baker
Communications Director
Medical College of Georgia
Georgia Regents University
706-721-4421 Office
706-825-6473 Cell
tbaker@gru.edu

To view the original of this article CLICK HERE
.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

Vitamin D – Blood Pressure, Strokes & Heart Attacks

Vitamin D – Blood Pressure, Strokes & Heart Attacks
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Vitamin D cuts blood pressure and slashes risk of stroke and heart attack

MILLIONS of people could reduce their risk of high blood pressure by going out in the sunlight every day, says a report published today.

Published: Wed, June 12, 2013

Enjoying-the-sun-is-not-just-pleasant-but-a-health-booster-according-to-scientists Enjoying the sun is not just pleasant but a health booster, according to scientists

Scientists have found a direct link between a deficiency in vitamin D – caused by lack of exposure to the sun – and hypertension, which also raises the likelihood of stroke and heart attacks.

The worldwide study found that people with high concentrations of the “sunshine vitamin” had reduced blood pressure.

Scientists say there is a “strong case for food fortification with vitamin D to ­prevent some kinds of cardiovascular disease”.

A spokesman for Vitabiotics, who developed Ultra Vitamin D, which contains the preferred D3 form found in the body said: “Vitamin D has been called the ‘Wonder Vitamin’ as it plays a truly remarkable role in the body and is essential for all round good health. Vitamin D has been found to influence all 36 organ tissues in the body.

“It is not only vital for strong bones, but is now known for its role in the immune system, hormone metabolism, brain function and mood, Cardio-vascular function and now blood pressure regulation. While scientific data is mounting on almost a daily basis about the enormous benefits of vitamin D, at the same time it is clear most of us are not getting enough vitamin D due to the lack of sunlight we are exposed to throughout the year.

“New research shows that optimum intake levels of vitamin D may be far higher than previously thought and this has led to widespread calls from leading doctors and scientists across Europe for the RDA for vitamin D to be increased.”

Researchers at University College London carried out a genetic examination of 35 studies involving 155,000 people from across Europe and North America.

Lead researcher Dr Vimal Karani said while observational links between a lack of vitamin D and increases in blood pressure had been made in the past, the connection was not clear.

“The whole picture was somewhat confused, and we decided to try to figure it out once and for all,” he said.

Vitamin D is mainly made in the skin as a reaction to sunlight but may also be obtained from oily fish, eggs and fortified breakfast cereal. It is known to be important for good health, growth and strong bones.

In the study, researchers used genetic variants known as single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs, to reflect an individual’s vitamin D status in order to test for an association with hypertension.

The results, published at the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics in Paris, found a significant link.

For every 10 per cent increase in vitamin D concentrations, there was a 8.1 per cent decrease in the risk of developing hypertension.

sun, skin, vitamin dVitamin D is mainly made in the skin as a reaction to sunlight

Vitamin D has been called the Wonder Vitamin

A spokesman for Vitabiotics

Dr Karani, from the Institute of Child Health at UCL, said: “To put it in simple terms, by using this approach we can determine the cause and effect and be pretty sure that we’ve come to the right conclusion.

“Our study strongly suggests that some cases of cardiovascular disease could be prevented through vitamin D supplements or food fortification.”

He added: “We believe that we still have a lot to find out about the effect of vitamin D deficiency on health, and we now know that we have the tools to do so.”

Most foods naturally contain very little Vitamin D.

Some foods are already fortified with it, and the study called this to be extended.

The report was welcomed by health organisations in Britain where around 16 million people suffer from high blood pressure, most of them unaware of it.

Katharine Jenner, chief executive of Blood Pressure UK, said: “This study adds to the increasing body of research suggesting vitamin D is linked to high blood pressure, one of the biggest causes of death in the UK. Lowering your blood pressure will lower your risk of having a stroke or a heart attack.”

She added: “Find out your blood pressure numbers, and then you can take appropriate action.

“If we are to prevent more cardiovascular diseases we need to consider all the tools at our disposal, which may include vitamin D fortification, but also eating less salt, more fruit and vegetables and more exercise.”

Lack of vitamin D is common throughout the Western world. Mild deficiency causes tiredness and general aches and pains, but a more severe lack can cause rickets – where long bones are weakened and start to bend – in children and softening of the bones in adults.

Most at risk are pregnant and breastfeeding women, children under five, people aged 65 and over, and those not exposed to much sun.

Oil battles tumours 

A spoonful of olive oil a day and handful of nuts could hugely increase the chances of surviving prostate cancer, a study suggests.

Replacing 10 per cent of carbohydrate in a sufferer’s diet with vegetable fats lowered the risk of death by 29 per cent.

And eating an ounce of nuts a day lowered that risk by 18 per cent, according to the University of California study published online by the journal Jama Internal Medicine.

Researchers reported: “Our findings support following a heart-healthy diet.”

To view the original article CLICK HERE
.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW