Life's Roller Coaster

If I'm missing, or not taking messages sorry – I'm more angry about letting my friends down than YOU will ever be at being let down! Unfortunately that is sometimes a side effect of Cancer! Mea Culpa: may I blame being short fused & grumpy on it too! My first symptoms presented in Nov-1998 – Follow The Trail on >DIARY of CANCER< Immediately Below!

The Value Of Controlling Blood Pressure In Early Life

The Value Of Controlling Blood Pressure In Early Life
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Keeping Blood Pressure Low in Those Under 50

Higher blood pressure in young adulthood increases the risk for coronary heart disease, a new study found.

Researchers followed almost 3,500 men and women for 25 years with periodic physical examinations beginning in 1985, when all were healthy and 18 to 30 years old. They calculated their cumulative exposure to high blood pressure over the years.

The scientists, writing in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology, studied left ventricular dysfunction — damage to the part of the heart that pumps blood to the entire body except the lungs. Left ventricle impairment is a main cause of heart failure. They found the higher the blood pressure, the greater the damage to the left ventricle. In addition, even after adjusting for other risk factors, chronic high blood pressure in young adulthood increased coronary calcium in middle age to a degree similar to that of the initial stages of atherosclerosis.

“This paper highlights that in the first half of adult life, it’s very important to keep blood pressure as low as one can,” said the lead author, Dr. João A.C. Lima, a professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins, adding that “130/80 or 130/70 should be the goal for people under 50.”

Current guidelines advise treatment at 140/90 for people ages 30 to 59.

To view the original of this article CLICK HERE

Cumulative Blood Pressure in Early Adulthood and Cardiac Dysfunction in Middle AgeThe CARDIA Study

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Satoru Kishi, MD; Gisela Teixido-Tura, MD, PhD; Hongyan Ning, MD; Bharath Ambale Venkatesh, PhD; Colin Wu, PhD§; Andre Almeida, MD; Eui-Young Choi, MD; Ola Gjesdal, MD; David R. Jacobs, Jr., PhD; Pamela J. Schreiner, PhD; Samuel S. Gidding, MD; Kiang Liu, PhD; João A.C. Lima, MD
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2015;65(25):2679-2687. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2015.04.042
 

Abstract

Background  Cumulative blood pressure (BP) exposure may adversely influence myocardial function, predisposing individuals to heart failure later in life.

Objectives  This study sought to investigate how cumulative exposure to higher BP influences left ventricular (LV) function during young to middle adulthood.

Methods  The CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study prospectively enrolled 5,115 healthy African Americans and whites in 1985 and 1986 (baseline). At the year 25 examination, LV function was measured by 2-dimensional echocardiography; cardiac deformation was assessed in detail by speckle-tracking echocardiography. We used cumulative exposure of BP through baseline and up to the year 25 examination (millimeters of mercury × year) to represent long-term exposure to BP levels. Linear regression and logistic regression were used to quantify the association of BP measured repeatedly through early adulthood (18 to 30 years of age) up to middle age (43 to 55 years).

Results  Among 2,479 participants, cumulative BP measures were not related to LV ejection fraction; however, high cumulative exposure to systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were associated with lower longitudinal strain rate (both p < 0.001). For diastolic function, higher cumulative exposures to SBP and DBP were associated with low early diastolic longitudinal peak strain rate. Of note, higher DBP (per SD increment) had a stronger association with diastolic dysfunction compared with SBP.

Conclusions  Higher cumulative exposure to BP over 25 years from young adulthood to middle age is associated with incipient LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction in middle age.

Central Illustration

Early Adulthood Blood Pressure and Middle-Age Left Ventricular Function

Blood pressure (BP) trends with increasing age. The trajectory slope shows mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) with increasing age for white and black men and women. All BP measurements over 25 years were within guideline acceptable range (A and B). Systolic and diastolic function with increasing cumulative SBP and DBP. (C) For left ventricular (LV) systolic function, there were no differences in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) among cumulative SBP deciles; meanwhile, higher deciles of cumulative SBP produced a lower 4-chamber longitudinal peak systolic strain rate (Ell_SRs) compared with the lowest SBP (0% to 10%) decile. For LV diastolic function, early peak diastolic mitral velocity/peak early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E/e′) ratio increased in higher deciles of cumulative SBP compared with the lowest decile. Higher deciles of cumulative SBP were associated with lower 4-chamber longitudinal peak early diastolic strain rate (Ell_SRe) versus the lowest decile. (D) In considering cumulative DBP deciles, the same trends were seen for LVEF, as well as when comparing the higher deciles with the lowest group for Ell_SRs, E/e′ ratio, and Ell_SRe.

Perspectives

COMPETENCY IN MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE: BP in early adulthood is related to later systolic and diastolic ventricular dysfunction.

TRANSLATIONAL OUTLOOK: Further studies are needed to determine whether specific lifestyle interventions implemented to reduce DBP in early adulthood prevent HF from developing later in life.

 For more details from JACC CLICK HERE
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Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
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Putting Stents To The Test & Treating Heart Attacks

Putting Stents To The Test & Treating Heart Attacks
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Photo

 
A cardiologist showing the blocked arteries of a patient who had a right and left catheterization procedure at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden, N.J. Credit Mark Makela for The New York Times

Millions of Americans have had stents — small wire cages — inserted in their coronary arteries to prop them open. And many are convinced the devices are protecting them from heart attacks. After all, a partly blocked artery is now cleared, and the pain in a heart muscle starved of blood often vanishes once the artery is open again.

But while stents unquestionably save lives of patients in the throes of a heart attack or a threatened heart attack, there is no convincing evidence that stents reduce heart attack risk for people suffering from the chest pains known as stable angina. These are people who feel tightness or discomfort walking up a hill, for example, because a partly blocked coronary artery is depriving their heart of blood. But the pain or tightness goes away if they stop and rest or just stay still. And there is a reasonable argument that drugs — cholesterol-lowering statins in particular — might be just as good at reducing such pain.

“It is kind of amazing that we don’t have the evidence,” said Dr. David J. Maron, the director of preventive cardiology at Stanford.

Photo

 
Dr. David J. Maron, the director of preventive cardiology at Stanford, examining angiograms. Credit Peter Earl McCollough for The New York Times

Now, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute is trying to find out whether stents do in fact prevent heart attacks. The answer could change the standard of care for the more than half a million Americans annually who receive a new diagnosis of heart disease after they see a doctor for angina. Heart disease remains the biggest killer of Americans despite significant treatment advances in the past decade.

The typical treatment for angina is to thread a narrow catheter up from a blood vessel in the groin to the heart, squirt in a dye that allows a cardiologist to see blockages in arteries on X-rays, and then insert a stent in the blocked areas. Stents are safe but expensive. Medicare payments vary depending on what kind of stent is used and how many, but are generally above $10,000 and can be more than $17,000.

And stents are not always a permanent solution to chest pain, as Albert Nassar of Brooklyn discovered. When he had angina four years ago, the reason seemed clear and the solution straightforward. An angiogram — the test in which dye is injected into the coronary arteries — showed one was 90 percent blocked. When a doctor inserted a stent to open that artery, the pain vanished.

But three years later, Mr. Nassar, 59, again felt tightness in his chest as he rode a recumbent bike at the gym. He said he expected another stent, but his cardiologist surprised him. He told Mr. Nassar that the medical profession does not actually know if stents help people like him with moderate to severely blocked coronary arteries.

Then he asked Mr. Nassar if he would be part of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute clinical trial, known as Ischemia, and have his treatment decided randomly between two options. If he was assigned to one group, his doctors would look at his blocked artery with X-rays and open it mechanically with a stent or, if the X-rays showed he was among the minority whose blockage could not be opened with a stent, with bypass surgery. He would also be asked to take drugs and change his lifestyle to protect his heart. In the other, his treatment would consist solely of drugs and the lifestyle changes. There would be no peeking at his blockage.

Mr. Nassar leapt at the chance and when he was assigned to take the drugs — a statin, blood pressure drugs and an aspirin — he was delighted.

“I didn’t feel the urge to have another surgical procedure,” he said. “I’ve had enough of those.”

The idea that opening blocked arteries saves lives dates to the 1970s and ’80s. In those decades, neither stents nor statins were used. The only treatment for blocked arteries was bypass surgery, a major operation in which the ribs are split open and a patient is put on a heart-lung machine while the heart is stopped. A surgeon bypasses the blockage with a blood vessel taken from elsewhere in the body.

Studies at the time had found that surgery was better for patients with severe blockages of major coronary arteries than not having surgery.

Stents were introduced in the 1990s, and because they relieved pain and were far less invasive than bypass surgery, they became the treatment of choice. Doctors and patients started to believe they also saved lives in stable patients, though there was no solid evidence of that.

“The thought was, better to go in and open it up,” said Dr. Harmony R. Reynolds, a cardiologist at NYU Langone Medical Center and a principal investigator in the study that Mr. Nassar joined. “But now meds have gotten so good that it is not clear surgery adds anything for stable patients.”

Researchers tried to get an answer with a big federal study, called Courage, that was published in 2007. But many cardiologists said the study was flawed and they did not believe its conclusion that stents failed to prevent heart attacks and deaths.

In Courage, as in the new study, participants were given stents and intensive drug therapy —– a statin, blood pressure drugs and aspirin — or just the medicines. The criticism, though, was that doctors may have cherry-picked patients, excluding the sickest. Because angiograms revealed blockages in arteries before patients were invited to enroll in the trial, doctors who believed stents were lifesaving may never have asked patients with the most severe disease to join the study.

The result, skeptics said, was that most patients in the study were at such low risk that it did not matter which treatment they received. They were certain to do well, so the study proved nothing about whether stents worked.

Because of the doubts about that study and ingrained habits, medical practice was largely unchanged by its findings. A recent study, which analyzed recorded conversations between cardiologists and patients with stable angina, found that 75 percent of the cardiologists recommended stents and when they did, their patients almost always complied. And, the study found, on the rare occasions when the cardiologists presented both stents and medical treatment as options, none of the patients chose stenting.

The new study aims to avoid the methodological flaw in the 2007 Courage study. Patients who agree to participate are not given angiograms before being assigned a treatment. Instead, they are accepted into the trial on the basis of noninvasive tests that indicate blocked arteries and high risk of a heart attack. Their doctors know only that an artery is blocked — not which one or how much — so they are not able to pluck out patients they believe need stents and prevent them from entering the trial.

Photo

 
A coronary stent. They are safe, but expensive. Credit Peter Earl McCollough for The New York Times

Underlying the debate about the utility of stents is an uncertainty about how and why heart attacks occur.

For years, the common notion was they were caused by a plumbing problem. In this view, plaque — pimplelike lumps — partly blocked a coronary artery and grew until no blood could get through, and a stent was needed to open an artery before it closed completely.

But a leading hypothesis says there is no predicting where a heart attack will originate. It could start anywhere there is plaque, even if the plaque is not obstructing the flow of blood in an artery. Unpredictably, a piece of plaque can burst open. Blood starts to clot on the injured area. Soon, the blood clot clogs blocks the artery. The result is a heart attack.

It is known that certain plaques, with thin walls and bursting with fat-filled white blood cells, are prone to rupture. A study published in 2011 found that only a third of heart attacks originated in plaques that were blocking at least half of an artery, as seen on an angiogram. The rest began with the rupture of plaques that appeared to be causing no problems.

According to this view of how and why heart attacks happen, stenting would not be protective because people with atherosclerosis have arteries studded with plaque. The partly blocked area visible in an angiogram is no more likely to be the site of a heart attack than any other with plaque. But statins could work because they change the nature of plaques, making them less likely to rupture.

Although stents relieve chest pain, today’s medical therapy can, too, though it may take weeks or months.

But proving whether stents make a difference is turning out to be harder than expected. Many doctors and patients have such strong opinions about the value of stenting that recruitment for the new study has been difficult. Stents have become part of the fabric of heart disease care. Former President George W. Bush, for example, had a treadmill stress test in the summer of 2013 as part of a physical examination. When the test indicated he might have a blocked artery, he had an angiogram. It showed a partial blockage that a cardiologist opened with a stent.

The challenge now is to get Ischemia done and get some answers that might not be disputed. In the past two years, researchers randomized nearly 2,000 patients for the trial at the 300 participating medical centers. The plan is to 

Treating a Heart Attack

Doctors must first reopen the blocked artery and restore the flow of blood to the heart muscles.

Doctors insert a hollow catheter through the groin or an arm, threading it up a major artery and into the heart.

A deflated balloon is passed through the catheter to the site of the blockage.

The balloon is surrounded by a metal mesh stent. Inflating the balloon opens the artery and locks the stent in place.

Hospitals have been working to reduce the time needed to insert stents in patients having heart attacks.

“Cardiologists think this is a very important study intellectually,” said Dr. Maron, who is one of the study’s authors. “But when it comes to their own patients, some cardiologists balk, even though they know we don’t have the answer.”

The issue potentially affects many heart patients. “Half the people over 65 have blockages,” Dr. Gregg W. Stone, an interventional cardiologist at Columbia, said. “If you have some degree of atherosclerosis, you have blockages.”

And once a stress test or an angiogram reveals a blockage, it can be hard to ignore a partly blocked artery, hard to avoid thinking a stent has to help.

“People believe that if they have a blockage, they have to fix it mechanically,” said Dr. Judith S. Hochman, the study chairwoman for the Ischemia trial and a cardiologist at NYU Langone. “It seems logical, but in medicine, many things that seem logical are not true.”

Not only do cardiologists find it hard to fight their own feelings that stenting makes sense, they also find it hard to persuade patients to try medical therapy, said Dr. Brahmajee Nallamothu, an interventional cardiologist at the University of Michigan.

The concept that stenting helps, he said, “is a paradigm so deeply set on the part of the public and a lot of doctors that it is tough to overcome.”

Mr. Nassar was one of the rare patients who did not hesitate to enter the trial. Though stents had relieved his pain in the past, they were no panacea. Like most heart patients, he had never taken the most important drug for those with his condition: a statin.

So far, he says he is happy with his drug treatment. His angina is gone.

“I feel no pain,” he said.

To view the original of this article CLICK HERE

.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

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PANCREATIC CANCER It May Be Too Late If You Wait!

PANCREATIC CANCER It May Be Too Late If You Wait!
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The Silent Killer: 7 Early Warning Signs Of Pancreatic Cancer

shutterstock_209300635

Pancreatic cancer is known as the silent killer. It’s largely asymptomatic until it’s too late to successfully treat, which is why you should be particularly vigilant. Here’s seven early warning signs of pancreatic cancer.

 

1. Abdominal pain
Abdominal pain can mean many things. However, over 90% of pancreatic cancer patients experience some sort of abdominal discomfort. The pancreas is located in the middle of the upper abdomen, so if you get any persistent pain in that area, it might be a good idea to see your doctor.

2. Jaundice
Pancreatic cancer can form tumours, which block the bile ducts to the liver causing yellowing of the skin and discolouration of the eyes. If you notice any discolouration of your skin, it’s a good indication that your liver isn’t functioning properly, and it’s worth getting it checked out.

3. Diabetes
Most commonly, diabetes is a result of obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle. However, when it is paired with any of these seven symptoms, it could be an indication that something else is wrong. If you experience any diabetic symptoms suddenly, and lead a healthy life, ask your doctor to consider other causes.

4. Weight loss
Most forms of cancer cause significant weight loss, without any change to your diet. Cancers use up metabolic energy, and alter hormone production. If you notice any sudden weight loss, it’s worth having a check-up, as it could be anything from a thyroid problem, to Coeliacs disease, to cancer.

5. Bloating
Bloating can be a sign of other health issues, like a food intolerance, poor diet or dehydration. However, when paired with other common cancer symptoms, it might be time to seek advice.

6. Stool changes
If you notice any discolouration in your stool, it’s important to go and seek medical advice, as this can be sign of many cancers. A block in the bile duct can often produce light coloured, chalk like stools, which could suggest problems with the pancreas or liver.

7. Dermatitis
Blocked bile ducts can also cause issues with the skin, including patchiness, flakiness and itching. If you notice any rapid changes to your complexion, combined with any of the other symptoms, such as jaundice, the problem might be more than skin deep.

To view the original of this article CLICK HERE

.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

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Cancer Doctors Offer Way to Compare Medicines, Including by Cost

Cancer Doctors Offer Way to Compare Medicines, Including by Cost
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Alarmed by the rapid escalation in the price of cancer drugs, the nation’s leading oncology society unveiled on Monday a new way for doctors and patients to evaluate different treatments — one that pointedly includes a medicine’s cost as well as its effectiveness and side effects.

The release by the American Society of Clinical Oncology of what it calls its “value framework,” is part of a change in thinking among doctors, who once largely chose drugs based on their medical attributes alone. The major cardiology societies, for instance, are also now starting to factor cost into their evaluation of drugs.

“The reality is that many patients don’t get this information from their doctors and many doctors don’t have the information they need to talk with their patients about costs,” Dr. Richard Schilsky, chief medical officer of the oncology society, said in a news conference on Monday.

He said the price of new cancer drugs now averaged about $10,000 a month, and some cost $30,000 a month, which can mean prohibitive co-payments even for some patients with good insurance. “Many cancer patients are facing severe financial strain, even bankruptcy in some cases,” he said.

The value framework envisions considering two costs: the out-of-pocket costs for the patient and the overall cost of a drug to the health system.

Evaluating the latter cost would put doctors in the role of being stewards of societal resources. That is somewhat of a controversial role for doctors, since it might conflict with their duty to the patient in front of them. But the oncology society said it did not see those roles as being in conflict.

Some of the sample valuations presented by the society were far from flattering for the drugs involved.

Roche’s Avastin, when added to chemotherapy, had a net health benefit of 16 out of 130 possible points when used as an initial treatment for advanced lung cancer. Its monthly cost was $11,907.87, compared to $182.09 for the chemotherapy alone.

Eli Lilly’s Alimta for that same use had a net heath benefit of zero with a cost exceeding $9,000 a month compared to about $800 a month for the drugs it was compared to in the clinical trial.

A spokeswoman for Lilly said the trial analyzed by the oncology society understated Alimta’s effectiveness because it covered a broad population, whereas Alimta is approved for only one type of lung cancer. A spokeswoman for Roche said Avastin was the first drug to help lung cancer patients live longer than a year, and that the choice of treatments for life-threatening diseases was complex and personal.

The framework, published online Monday by The Journal of Clinical Oncology is more a proposed methodology that will now be open for public comment. It will take time to input the data on the effectiveness, side effects and costs of each drug, and convert it to a system that can be used on computers and mobile phones.

There is no requirement that doctors use the framework and it remains to be seen if they will. But the authors of the document say it is a start.

“It allows the patient and the doctor to at least talk through the issues,” said Dr. Lee N. Newcomer, senior vice president for oncology at UnitedHealthcare, the big insurance company, and a member of the task force that developed the framework. “Before, the information wasn’t there.”

UnitedHealthcare is mounting a similar effort of its own, Dr. Newcomer said. Starting this month, it is requiring oncologists to get prior approval from the insurance company for every cancer drug they administer. The company will then track what happens to patients and eventually provide information to doctors about how well each drug works.

Concern about cancer drug prices has been rising for years and doctors have been becoming increasingly vocal. At its annual meeting late last month, the oncology society included a talk sharply criticizing the prices of cancer drugs as part of its plenary session.

Randy Burkholder, vice president for policy and research at the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, the drug industry trade group, said that drugs represented only 20 percent of cancer treatment costs. He also said that the big clinical trials that the oncology society used to make its value calculations might not be as relevant as treatment becomes increasingly personalized based on genetic analysis of a patient’s tumor.

Some experts say that ideally, the price of a drug should reflect its value, but that does not seem to be the case with cancer drugs. A recent study by researchers from the National Cancer Institute, published in JAMA Oncology, surveyed cancer drugs approved from 2009 through 2013. It found that prices did not correlate very well with how novel a drug was or whether it prolonged life versus just shrinking tumors.

The framework computes a score — called the net health benefit — based on clinical trial data.

Drugs for advanced cancer are given a score from 0 to 130. Up to 80 of the points are based on a drug’s effectiveness in prolonging lives, delaying the worsening of cancer or shrinking tumors. Then up to 20 points can be added or subtracted based on side effects. And up to 30 bonus points can be granted if the drug relieves cancer symptoms or allows a patient to go without treatment for a period of time.

The costs of the drug are listed separately, rather than incorporated into the final score for a drug. That is a step short of what is done in some evaluations, such as those by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in Britain, in which drugs are rated by the cost per extra year of life they provide, adjusted by side effects and symptoms.

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center recently announced a tool that allows people to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of cancer drugs.

These other institutions “take the next step to say ‘What do we think about this amount of benefit at this cost?’” said Dr. Steven D. Pearson, president of the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, a nonprofit organization that evaluates the clinical and cost effectiveness of treatments.

Dr. Lowell E. Schnipper, chairman of the task force that developed the oncology society’s framework, said that patients wanted to know how medically effective a drug is. Adding the cost into an overall rating would obscure that information, he said.

Each drug is evaluated based on how it did in clinical trials compared to a control group, and the control groups can be different. That makes it difficult to compare one drug to another.

“This is not a way of ranking drugs,” said Dr. Schnipper, who is clinical director of the cancer center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. “This is simply a way of understanding the outcome of a clinical trial.”

To view the original of this article CLICK HERE

.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
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The Importance Of Speedy NHS Treatment Can NOT Be Over-estimated!

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The Importance Of Speedy NHS Treatment Can NOT Be Over-estimated!
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Hi,

lets look at Heart Attacks in a little more detail, and just how important speedy attention is.One can but hope that someone in the Welsh Health Service reads this article – someone in a position to bypass and thus overcome the crass mismanagement of the Welsh EU Regional branch of the British NHS, under Labour control in the devolved misgovernance that goes with EU regional Assemblies!

I well remember the staggering incompetence of the NHS at The Royal Gwent when I suffered my heart attack – how I survived their utter mismanagement, tardy diagnosis and utter incompetenc is something of a miracle.It is not just emergency care through A&E or MAU I have experienced unconcionable delays in SAU also – not to mention presenting with classic symptoms of urinary tract cancer in November 1997 yet they took until July 2001 to make a diagnosis and even then it was only the intervention of Daniel Foggo, a perspnal friend and leading investigative journalist for then The Sunday Telegraph, quizzing the Gwent as to why the delay in operating for a radical open nephrectomy by September 2001. My Consultant informed me that I was very lucky as the cancer was on the verge of breaking out of the kidney to make survival extremely unlikely and that my life had been saved by Daniel’s intervention!

Then again a few years later whilst having bladder cancer dealt with via TURBC a sinister growth was noted and although I asked if the surgeon could immediately procede to remove it I was told it was ‘above his pay grade’ to make that decision, or words to that effect. I waited from the op on 31-Dec-2010 for a scan in Apr-2011 – by which time I had fully developed tumours in my abdomen and cancerous lymph glands which presented me with a life expectancy of 2 to 3 months!I was fortunate and whether by virtue of luck, harsh treatment, general constitution or attitude, or more likely a combination of the four I am still here today.

In the treatment of cancer speed of action plays an all important part – however the treatment of Heart Attacks is even more dramatically dependent on wasting no time and acting as rapidly as possible, as shown in the articles below.

How I survived a Heart Attack at 06:15hrs. 19-N0v-2012 I will never know, a Heart Attack that went totally untreated by the NHS in the hopelessly mismanaged Labour controlled devolver Welsh EU Assembly Region as I drove myself from my Doctor’s in Chepstow to find parking and find the MAU in the Royal Gwent in Newport, where I  waited around for hours in pain and was even told to walk some distance to the radiology dempartment to wait yet further for a scan before finding my way back to MAU – actual drugs to try to curb the pain and deal with the heart attack were not administered until around 03:00hrs. 20-Nov-2012, the following morning!
 

CAMDEN, N.J. — Yvette Samuels was listening to jazz late one night when she felt a stabbing pain down her left shoulder. She suspected a heart attack — she had heard about the symptoms from watching a Rosie O’Donnell standup routine on television — and managed to scratch on the door that connected her single room to her neighbor’s. He found her collapsed on the floor.

Paramedics arrived minutes later and slapped electrocardiogram leads on her chest, transmitting the telltale pattern of a heart attack to Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center here.

As the ambulance raced through the streets, lights swirling, sirens screaming, Ms. Samuels, who took phone orders for a company that delivers milk, asked the paramedic, “Can this kill me?” He murmured yes, then told the driver, “Step on it!” She thought to herself, “This will be my last view of the world, the last time I will see the night sky.”

Instead, she survived, her heart undamaged, the beneficiary of the changing face of heart attack care. With no new medical discoveries, no new technologies, no payment incentives — and little public notice — hospitals in recent years have slashed the time it takes to clear a blockage in a patient’s arteries and get blood flowing again to the heart.

The changes have been driven by a detailed analysis of the holdups in treating patients and a nationwide campaign led by the American College of Cardiology, a professional society for specialists in heart disease, and the American Heart Association. Hospitals across the country have adopted common-sense steps that include having paramedics transmit electrocardiogram readings directly from ambulances to emergency rooms and summoning medical teams with a single call that sets off all beepers at once.

What Is A
Heart Attack?

The heart has four chambers, which are separated by valves and surrounded by muscle.

The right side pumps blood back to the lungs for more oxygen.

The left side pumps oxygen-rich blood through the body.

Cardiac arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscles.

If an artery becomes clogged or blocked, the downstream muscle is starved of blood.

This is a heart attack.

 
 
 

From 2003 to 2013, the death rate from coronary heart disease fell about 38 percent, according to the American Heart Association citing data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the primary federal agency that funds heart research, says this decline has been spurred by better control of cholesterol and blood pressure, reduced smoking rates, improved medical treatments — and faster care of people in the throes of a heart attack.

“It may not be long before cardiovascular disease is no longer the leading cause of death” in the United States, said Dr. Michael Lauer, the director of the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

And care has improved not just in elite medical centers, but in local hospitals like Our Lady of Lourdes, here in a city littered with abandoned buildings and boarded-up homes that is among the poorest in America, according to the Census Bureau. Disparities that used to exist, with African-Americans, Hispanics and older people facing the slowest treatment times, have disappeared, Dr. Harlan Krumholz, a cardiologist at Yale, and his colleagues said in a paper in Archives of Internal Medicine.

The reinvention of protocols to hasten treatment is part of a broad rethinking of how to tackle coronary heart disease, which accounts for one of every seven deaths in the United States or 375,000 a year. Just this month, powerful drugs from the first new class of medicines to lower bad cholesterol levels in a generation neared approval by the Food and Drug Administration, raising hopes that they will further reduce the death rate from heart disease. At the same time, new, less invasive methods for replacing aged heart valves are raising hopes that ailing patients will be able to live longer. And researchers are immersed in resolving issues that remain unsettled: the utility of stents to treat the heart pain known as angina and the ideal level for blood pressure.

Lack of Speed Kills

In a heart attack, a blocked artery prevents blood from reaching an area of heart muscle. At first, cells are merely stunned, but as minutes tick by, they start to die. The way to save the heart is to open the blocked artery by pushing in a catheter, inflating a tiny balloon that shoves the blockage aside, and holding the artery open by inserting a stent, a tiny wire cage.

But leading cardiologists had despaired of reaching a national goal set by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association of getting this done for at least half of heart attack patients within 90 minutes of arrival at a hospital. Often it took more than two hours for blood to flow to a patient’s heart again.

Photo

 
Procedures at Lourdes allow cardiologists like Dr. Thierry Momplaisir, right, and nurse Krista Damirgian to start working on a patient faster. Credit Mark Makela for The New York Times

Now, nearly all hospitals treat at least half their patients in 61 minutes or less, according to the most recent data from the American College of Cardiology. At Yale-New Haven Hospital, where half the patients used to have to wait at least 150 minutes before their arteries were opened, the median time is now 57 minutes. At the Mayo Clinic and at major academic centers like NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, it is 50 minutes — a statistic that, amazingly, Lourdes matches.

Some cardiologists still express sadness at the price many patients paid when care was much slower. Dr. Mahesh Bikkina, the director of the cardiac catheterization laboratory at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center in Paterson, N.J., tells his trainees about the old days: heart muscles that tore, with blood leaking out of holes, and valves that ruptured, leading to sudden death if not repaired immediately with open-heart surgery.

“I tell them you will read about these things in textbooks,” Dr. Bikkina said. “You will almost never see them.”

Dr. Brahmajee Nallamothu, a University of Michigan cardiologist, said he remembered patients who became cardiac cripples after long delays in receiving treatment, their hearts so damaged that the slightest exertion exhausted them.

“What I feel about this, what is really meaningful to me, is when we finally stopped saying, ‘You know, this stuff happens,’ and started taking control and saying, ‘This is not acceptable,’ ” Dr. Nallamothu said.

The improvements in treatment have spilled over into the care of stroke victims. Neurologists watched with envy as cardiologists slashed their times. For strokes, too, the time it takes to be treated with the clot-dissolving drug tPA is of the essence. “Time is brain,” neurologists say. They began to copy the cardiologists.

“Seeing that someone else could do it was remarkably motivating and a little bit competitive,” said Dr. Lee H. Schwamm, the chief of stroke services at Massachusetts General Hospital. “If they can do it, why can’t we?”

The payoff from the changes has been breathtaking, experts say.

“Heart disease mortality is dropping like a stone. This is a reason why,” said Dr. Eric Peterson, a cardiology researcher at Duke. “And stroke has fallen to fifth as a major killer. This is a reason why.”

Treating a Heart Attack

Doctors must first reopen the blocked artery and restore the flow of blood to the heart muscles.

Doctors insert a hollow catheter through the groin or an arm, threading it up a major artery and into the heart.

A deflated balloon is passed through the catheter to the site of the blockage.

The balloon is surrounded by a metal mesh stent. Inflating the balloon opens the artery and locks the stent in place.

Hospitals have been working to reduce the time needed to insert stents in patients having heart attacks.

 

A City at Risk

No city seemed more in need of improved heart care than Camden, where 42 percent of the population lives in poverty and heart disease risk factors abound, according to various studies. Obesity is rampant, as are high cholesterol levels, high blood pressure and smoking. A quarter of the population ages 50 to 59 who were hospitalized for any reason had diabetes. The vast majority of residents are Hispanic or African-American, groups with a relatively high prevalence of heart disease.

Most Camden residents having a heart attack are rushed to Lourdes, a medium-size Roman Catholic hospital founded in 1950 by the Franciscan Sisters of Allegany to serve the poor. It looks like a bisque-colored wedding cake perched high on a hill, with a statue of the Virgin Mary on top, hands folded in prayer. Its beige corridors are hushed, with no crackling intercom announcements to disturb the quiet. The staff members say they have a mission to serve their patients with reverence. Some have roots that go deep. One nurse, Brian Shannon, was born at Lourdes, as were his children. His mother worked there as a nurse for 35 years.

The Lourdes cardiology department has long felt pretty cocky about how it was doing. Heart care is the hospital’s specialty, and without its revenue, said Dr. Reginald Blaber, who runs the medical center’s cardiovascular disease program, Lourdes would have to close its doors.

Continue reading the main story

Mending Hearts

Articles in this series will explore new approaches to treating heart disease.

Part 1 A Sea Change in Treating Heart Attacks

Part 2 Building a Better Valve

In 2007, the first year of a national campaign to speed treatment, half the patients at Lourdes waited at least 93 minutes before their arteries were opened. By 2011, Lourdes had a median treatment time of 71 minutes.

But at a staff meeting that year, Dr. Blaber challenged members of his team to do better. He pointed out that 16 percent of patients had to wait more than 90 minutes. “What if that one time when it took more than 90 minutes it was your mom?” he asked them.

Staff members set up what they called the D2B task force, standing for door to balloon time — the crucial period from when the patient enters the hospital until the cardiologist can thread a balloon into the blocked artery, inflate it, push the blockage aside and let blood flow again. They broke down the process, looking for opportunities to shave off a minute or two.

They decided to have paramedics do an electrocardiogram, which can show the characteristic electrical pattern of the heart that signals a heart attack, as soon as they reached the patient and transmit it directly to the emergency room. That meant the staff could spring into action the moment the ambulance pulled in. The hospital designated a beige phone on a counter in the E.R. for calls from paramedics.

They eliminated a big time sink — the requirement that a cardiologist look at the electrocardiogram and decide if an interventional cardiologist, who would open the blocked artery, should see it, too. Why not just give the emergency room doctor authority to call in the specialist?

It made a huge difference, Dr. Blaber said. Before, the E.R. doctor would fax an electrocardiogram to him. “The fax machine would go eh, eh, eh,” he said. And then he’d look at it: “ ‘Oh, God, I can’t read it. Send it again.’ Five minutes go by, seven minutes go by, 10 minutes go by. ‘Yeah, it’s a Stemi,’ ” he would say, using the acronym for a heart attack. “‘Let’s call the interventionalist.’ ”

In another change, the hospital operator began summoning members of the heart attack team with a single phone call that sounded their beepers simultaneously. And each member of the staff on call was required to be within 30 minutes of the hospital. Karl Madrid, a nurse, now spends on-call nights at his parents’ house in Voorhees, N.J. Dr. Ibrahim Moussa, a cardiologist, sleeps in his scrubs at a Crowne Plaza hotel four miles from the hospital when he is on call.

Photo

 
A physical therapist, Laura Funk, assisting Yvette Samuels, who was preparing for a short walk in the hallway at Lourdes as she recovered from a heart attack. Credit Jessica Kourkounis for The New York Times

The relatively languid step-by-step preparation of patients in the emergency room was transformed. Now when a patient arrives, staff members swarm the stretcher and within five minutes undress the patient, place defibrillator pads on the chest, insert two intravenous lines, shave the patient’s groin where the catheter will be inserted and snaked up to the heart, supply oxygen through a cannula in the nose, and provide medications like morphine, a blood thinner, and a drug to control heart rhythms.

One room has been designated for heart attack patients and is kept stocked with the necessary supplies, to avoid last minute scrambles for wires or catheters.

And a requirement that long consent forms be filled out before the team could get to work was jettisoned. The hospital’s lawyers advised that in an emergency, the team could get by with the patient’s name, date of birth and Social Security number.

“Everybody was anxious,” said Dr. Audrey Sernyak, a cardiologist who led the D2B team. “Everybody was giving up a lot of control. And everybody worried it might not go smoothly.”

But treatment times plunged.

Learning From the Swift

The heart story began nearly a decade ago when Dr. Krumholz, the Yale cardiologist, had an idea.

Medicare had created a national database showing how long it took hospitals across the country to get heart patients’ arteries opened. It was a bell curve year after year, and the times were not getting any better. But there were a few hospitals at the tail end of the curve that year after year were treating people in an hour or so.

Dr. Krumholz and his colleagues visited the 11 best performing hospitals. They were not famous institutions or major medical centers, said Elizabeth Bradley, a professor of public health at Yale and a leader in the project. Some were community hospitals; others were far from major population centers. The investigators recorded every detail of how the hospitals got things done and ended up with a short list of what the stellar performers had in common — procedures Lourdes later adopted.

They included paramedics’ transmitting electrocardiogram readings to emergency rooms, E.R. doctors’ deciding whether a person was likely having a heart attack, and hospital operators’ summoning treatment teams with a single call. These hospitals also continually measured performance.

Dr. Krumholz said he was particularly struck by the role of emergency room doctors. Interventional cardiologists were giving up the power to decide if they and the entire staff required to open an artery needed to dash in, often in the middle of the night.

“It is very rare for a group to give up power and get nothing in return,” he said. “You are saying, ‘You can call me at 3 in the morning and I am not going to question you.’ ”

At Yale, and most other places, Dr. Krumholz said, the procedures had been very different, with a long telephone chain of doctors and other staff members called one by one as precious minutes ticked by.

“A patient would come in, and the emergency room doctor would see him,” Dr. Krumholz recalled. “He would say, ‘O.K. I think we should call the primary care doctor.’ The primary care doctor would say: ‘I think we should call a cardiologist. I wonder which cardiologist to call.’ Sometimes, the first cardiologist was not available, so another had to be called. The cardiologist would call an interventional cardiologist, the specialist who could open the artery. The hospital page operator would try to find phone numbers for nurses and technicians and start calling each one in turn. Finally, when the staff had arrived, the patient would be wheeled into the cardiac catheterization lab to have his artery opened.

The problem was even worse if a patient went first to a community hospital that could not open an artery with a stent, said Dr. Nallamothu, of the University of Michigan. His group joked that a community hospital nearby was “30 minutes by car and three hours by ambulance” because it took so long for the community hospital emergency room to call the university’s emergency room and for the long chain of telephone calls to be completed.

Photo

 
A 15-ton statue of the Virgin Mary atop Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center. The hospital is in Camden, N.J., one of the poorest cities in the United States. Credit Mark Makela for The New York Times

The Yale researchers then surveyed a random sample of 365 hospitals and discovered that those that used one or more of six specific strategies to cut down on the time it took to get patients to the treatment room and open their arteries did better than those that had not, and that as more strategies were used, patients were being treated increasingly faster.

“We were shocked,” Dr. Bradley said. The results were so much better than she had hoped.

Dr. Krumholz and his colleagues persuaded The New England Journal of Medicine to publish their already accepted paper in the same week at the end of November 2006 that the American College of Cardiology announced a national campaign to get hospitals to change their ways. Twelve hundred committed to doing so.

Doctors and hospitals began competing to see who could have the best times. The initiative tapped into professional pride and a thirst to be the best. And, of course, hospitals wanted patients.

Within a few years, times were dropping all over the nation.

But then a debate arose.

A paper by Dr. Peterson, the Duke cardiologist, and his colleagues, published in The New England Journal of Medicine in 2013, said that even though times had plummeted, the death rates for heart attack patients whose arteries were opened with balloons and stents had not budged. Could it be that faster just seemed better but that it actually made no difference to patient outcomes?

“That was demoralizing,” Dr. Krumholz said. But he did an analysis that found that the universe of heart attack patients being treated with stents and balloons had changed markedly. It used to be just the younger and healthier people who were more likely to have their arteries opened. Now, as the procedure became more popular and so many more people were treated this way, the group included more older and sicker people.

Dr. Peterson concluded that analyses like his and Dr. Krumholz’s had challenges. The problem, he said, is that it is hard to accurately compare treatments given at different points. Nonetheless, the consensus — which he shares with Dr. Krumholz and other leading cardiologists — is that the shorter times and improved medical care contributed to the declining death rates and better outcomes for heart attack patients.

A Never-Ending Mission

At Lourdes, the push to be faster — and to fix the problems that slow things down — continues.

The weekend that Ms. Samuels was rushed to Lourdes, two other heart attack patients were brought in. First was Kevin Whisler, 43, a postal worker by day and forklift operator by night. He had been having what he thought was heartburn for two days, gulping Tums, Rolaids and Pepcid. Finally, on Saturday night, March 28, he went to an urgent care center, where a practitioner did an electrocardiogram and called an ambulance.

“You’ve got to be kidding me,” Mr. Whisler said. “I go in for heartburn and now you tell me I’m having a heart attack?”

Mr. Whisler’s doctor had prescribed a statin for his high cholesterol level and a medication for his diabetes. But Mr. Whisler said he thought he was too young to be taking pills every day and was trying to control his risk factors with diet.

In Less Than an Hour, a Heart Is Pumping Again

Doctors at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden, N.J., were able to clear Yvette Samuels’s blocked artery 55 minutes after she arrived at the emergency room.

Around 1:30 a.m. on March 29 Ms. Samuels has a heart attack. She receives an electrocardiogram in the ambulance.
Clock starts at 1:54 a.m. The ambulance delivers Ms. Samuels to the emergency room.
6 minutes Staff members prepare her for surgery. The emergency room doctor orders another EKG before paging the heart attack team.
9 minutes A single phone call pages the heart attack team. An operating room is prepared.
33 minutes The heart attack team begins to arrive. A cardiologist obtains consent from Ms. Samuels and prepares to move her.
41 minutes Ms. Samuels is moved to the operating room, where doctors begin surgery on her heart.
55 minutes at 2:49 a.m. A balloon and stent inserted into Ms. Samuels’s wrist and maneuvered to her heart clear her blocked artery.

He was stunned by the speed with which things happened at Lourdes. Lying in his hospital bed the next day, he said he felt great and was going home in another day, inspired now to take his medications.

But at a staff meeting the next Monday morning, no one was happy with Mr. Whisler’s time — 72 minutes. The reason though, had nothing to do with the hospital; it was an issue with the urgent care center. The peeved cardiologist who treated him, Dr. Thierry Momplaisir, complained that the center did not notify the hospital that it had a heart attack patient or transmit his electrocardiogram. The emergency department was not prepared for his arrival, and it took 12 minutes before Mr. Whisler had another electrocardiogram. When the doctor saw the characteristic pattern, she asked the hospital operator to page the heart attack team.

Dr. Momplaisir was paged just as he was about to take a shower and go to a gala for the hospital. He pulled on his scrubs and jumped into his black Mercedes-Benz, speeding from his home in Villanova, Pa., in 20 minutes. But look at all the time that was wasted, he told the group.

It took a speedy 55 minutes from the time Ms. Samuels arrived at the hospital until her artery was opened, but the time could have been even better, Dr. Momplaisir said. She had her heart attack around 1:30 a.m. on Sunday, March 29. The paramedics transmitted her electrocardiogram to the emergency room. The beige phone in the E.R. dedicated to heart attacks rang, and a doctor picked it up. “We have a Stemi, female, age 49, 10 minutes out,” a paramedic said.

The only doctor in the E.R. that night was dealing with three life-threatening emergencies: a stroke patient and two people in respiratory distress who needed breathing tubes. The doctor, who declined to be identified for this article, explained her decisions to her colleagues Dr. Alfred Sacchetti and Dr. Blaber. She knew what to do when that phone rang — decide if she agreed the patient was having a heart attack. If she did, she would instruct the hospital operator to call in the heart attack team. But, Dr. Sacchetti said, the decision this time was not so clear cut. It was, he said, a judgment call.

Ms. Samuels was only 49 and her symptoms, as described, seemed ambiguous. So the doctor decided to get the emergency room ready so that as soon as Ms. Samuels arrived, she could be evaluated and have another electrocardiogram. If she was having a heart attack, the cardiac team would be paged. That, Dr. Sacchetti said, was a reasonable course.

But the cardiologist on call, Dr. Momplaisir, was annoyed. He rushed in from home, as he had for Mr. Whisler a few hours earlier, but 10 minutes had been wasted waiting for the ambulance to arrive at the emergency room before he was paged.

The outcome was excellent, though — Ms. Samuels’s artery was opened fast enough to save her heart muscle. There was no permanent damage, Dr. Momplaisir said.

Ms. Samuels is overwhelmingly grateful that she got to the hospital in time.

“I am the face of life,” she said.

Photo

 
This phone in the Lourdes emergency room is used only to alert the heart attack team that a patient is on the way. Credit Mark Makela for The New York Times

That same night, the beige phone rang again. Another heart attack. This time it was a 63-year-old woman, Carmen Pierce, who lives with her daughter in a trailer nearby. “I was sweating from my head on down,” she said. “And I felt a pinching, in my shoulder, in my back. ”

She has diabetes and thought the problem must be low blood sugar. Her daughter gave her orange juice, but Ms. Pierce passed out holding the glass. Her daughter called 911.

This time, the emergency room doctor immediately told the hospital operator to page the staff and the backup cardiologist on call; Dr. Momplaisir was busy with Ms. Samuels. The cardiologist, Dr. Moussa, was sound asleep in his scrubs in his eighth-floor room at the Crowne Plaza. He arrived at the hospital just as Ms. Pierce was being wheeled in on a gurney. She and her daughter were crying in fear as staff members converged on her.

“Listen, we will get you through this,” Dr. Moussa said.

Ms. Pierce started to crash by the time they got her to the operating room. Three of her arteries were obstructed and one was totally blocked, causing her heart attack. That one was calcified, making it difficult to push the artery open.

It took 52 minutes to stabilize her and open her calcified artery.

“I don’t know what they did, but the pain was gone,” Ms. Pierce said afterward from her hospital bed.

She was lucky, Dr. Moussa said. “If she had stayed home, her heart would have stopped.”

Nights like that, he added, “are what we live for.”

To view the original of these articles CLICK HERE
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Regards,
Greg_L-W.
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 Please Be Sure To
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To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings. . Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar. . You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
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YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

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CANCER – A Natural Approach To Cure – WITH CAVEAT + 265 Page .pdf

CANCER – A Natural Approach To Cure – WITH CAVEAT + 265 Page .pdf
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NATURE CURE
& NATURAL METHODS OF TREATMENT

Overview

For those who are followers of Natural Health & Natural Cures – Particularly those who are Asian or follow Asian medical practices.

We have uploaded a 265 page .pdf of cures and herbs, details and cures of primarily Indian origin.

THIS DOES NOT constitute a recommendation in any way by this web site – ALL such cures should be considered little more than Snake Oil and like the use of Chemotherapy, Drugs and the like in the treatment of cancer you should make any decisions ONLY when you have thoroughly considered the dangers, side effects and efficacy.

IF in ANY doubt discuss all treatments with your medical team.

That said YOU may find the contents of the .pdf of interest as an educational curio alone, whilst others may find it of value based upon their beliefs.

Details

You decide: 

To view the full .pdf Click Here

Comments

We would much appreciate YOUR opinions on any page of the document provided, in which you have a particular knowledge or expertise.

NATURE CURE:

CANCER
The word ‘cancer ‘ comes from the latin “carcinoma” meaning crab. It is the most dreaded
disease and refers to all malignant tumours caused by the abnormal growth of a body cell or a
group of cells . It is today the second largest killer in the world, next only to heart ailments. The
term covers more than 200 diseases.
The majority of cancers occur in the age group 50-60. Sex does not affect the incidence of the
disease. It, however, affects the site of growth. In men, cancer is usually found in the intestines,
the prostate and the lungs. In women, it occurs mostly in the breast tissues, uterus, gall-bladder
and thyroid.
Symptoms
The symptoms of cancer vary according to the site of the growth. The American Cancer Society
has prescribed seven signs or danger signals in general which may indicate the presence of
cancer. These are : a sore that does not heal ; change in bowel or bladder habits ; unusual
bleeding or discharge ; thickening or lump in breast or elsewhere ; indigestion or difficulty in
swallowing ; obvious change in a wart or a mole, and a persistent and nagging cough or
hoarseness. Other symptoms may include unexplained loss of weight , particularly in older
people, a change in skin colour and changes in the menstrual periods, especially bleeding
between periods.
Causes
The prime cause of cancer is not known. Certain cancer- causing substances, known as
carcinogens, however, increase the chances of getting the disease. About 80 per cent of
cancers are caused by environmental factors . Forty per cent of male cancers in India are linked
with tobacco, a known cancer- causing agent. The consumption of pan, bettlenut, tobacco and
slaked lime has been linked with lung and throat cancers. Heavy consumption of alcoholic drinks
can cause oesophagal, stomach and liver cancers. Occupational exposure to industrial
pollutants such as asbestos, nickel, tar, soot and high doses of X-rays can lead to skin and lung
cancers and leukemia. Other factors contributing to cancer are vital infections, trauma, hormone
imbalance and malnutrition. Many well-known biologists and naturopaths, however, believe that
a faulty diet is the root cause of cancer. Investigations indicate that the cancer incidence is in
direct proportion to the amount of animal protein, particularly meat, in the diet. Dr. Willard J.
Visek, a renowned research scientist explained recently a link between excessive meat-eating
and cancer. According to him, the villain is ammonia, the carcinogenic by-product of meat
digestion.
Treatment
The effective treatment of cancer consists of a complete change in diet, besides total elimination
of all environmental sources of carcinogens, such as smoking and carcinogenic chemicals in air
, water and food. There has recently been a surge of popular interest in the concept that diet is
not just a minor, but rather a major factor in both the development and the prevention of cancer.
The disease can be prevented and even treated by dietary programmes that include ‘natural
foods ‘ and the use of megavitamin supplements.
As a first step, the patient should cleanse the system by thoroughly relieving constipation and
making all the organs of elimination – the skin, lungs, liver, kidneys and bowels – active. Enemas
should be used to cleanse the colon. For the first four or five days, the patient should take only
juicy fruits like oranges, grapefruits, lemons, apples, peaches, pears, pineapples and tomatoes.
Vegetable juices are also useful, especially carrot juice.
After a few days of an exclusive fruit diet, the patient may be given a nourishing alkaline-based
diet. It should consist of 100 per cent natural foods, with emphasis on raw fruits and vegetables,
particularly carrots , green leafy vegetables, cabbage, onion, garlic , cucumber, asparagus,
beets and tomatoes. A minimum requirement of high quality protein, mostly from vegetable
sources such as almonds, millet, sesame seeds, sprouted seeds and grains, may be added to
the diet.
Dr. Ann Wigmore of Boston, U.S.A., the well-known naturopath and a pioneer in the field of living
food nutrition, has been testing the effect of a drink made of fresh wheatgrass in the treatment of
leukemia. She claims to have cured several cases of this disease by this method. Dr. Wigmore
points out that by furnishing the body with live minerals, vitamins, trace elements and chlorophyll
through wheatgrass juice, it may be able to repair itself.
Johanna Brandt, the author of the book ‘ The Grape Cure ‘ has advocated an exclusive grape
diet for the treatment of cancer. She discovered this mode of cure in 1925, while experimenting
on herself by fasting and dieting alternately in the course of her nine-year battle with cancer. She
claimed to have cured herself by this mode of treatment. She recommends a fast for two or three
days so as to prepare the system for the change of diet.
After the short fast, the patient should have a grape meat every two hours from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
This should be followed for a week or two even a month or two, in chronic cases of long
standing. The patient should begin the grape cure with a small quantity of 30, 60, to 90 grams
per meal, gradually increasing this to double the quantity. In course of time, about 250 grams
may safely be taken as a meal.
Recent researches have shown that certain vitamins can be successfully employed in the fight
against cancer and that they can increase the life expectancy of some terminal cancer patients.
According to recent Swedish studies vitamin C in large doses can be an effective prophylactic
agent against cancer. Noted Japanese scientist, Dr. Fukunir Morishige, and his colleagues who
have been examining the healing potential of vitamin C for the last 30 years, have recently found
that a mixture of vitamin C and copper compound has lethal effects on cancer.
According to several studies, vitamin A exerts an inhibiting effect on carcinogenesis. It is one of
the most important aids to the body’s defence system to fight and prevent cancer. Dr. Leonida
Santamaria and his colleagues at the University of Pavia in Italy have uncovered preliminary
evidence suggesting that beta-carotene, a precursor of vitamin A may actually inhibit skin cancer
by helping the body thwart the cancer-causing process known as oxidation.
Recent studies from all over the world suggest that a liberal use of green and yellow vegetables
and fruits can prevent cancer. The 20-years old, ongoing Japanese study found that people who
ate green and yellow vegetables every day had a decreased risk of developing lung, stomach
and other cancers. A Harvard University study of more than 1,200 elderly Massachusetts
residents found that those who reported the highest consumption of carrots, squash, tomatoes,
salads or leafy green vegetables, dried fruits, fresh strawberries or melon had a decreased risk
of cancer.
The other useful measures are plenty of rest, complete freedom from worries and mental stress
and plenty of fresh, pure air.
To view the full 265 page .pdf of Asian Natural Health Cures CLICK HERE
.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
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From The Bottom Up – Dealing With Potential Bowel Cancer

From The Bottom Up – Dealing With Potential Bowel Cancer
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Hi,
a new approach to dealing with the pre cancerous polyps that do in aome cases develope into bowel cancer – less invasive and less risky:

How the ‘bear claw’ removes bowel tumours – in 45 minutes: No need for a scalpel as device sucks up pre-cancerous growths

  • ‘Bear claw’ hailed as major breakthrough in the prevention of bowel cancer
  • Device sucks up and removes pre-cancerous growths in just 45 minutes
  • A physician at Southampton General Hospital is now using the ‘bear claw’
  • There is no need for a scalpel meaning a reduced risk of perforating bowel

A device nicknamed ‘the bear claw’, which sucks up and removes pre-cancerous growths, is being hailed as a major breakthrough in the prevention of bowel cancer.

Some patients can face complicated surgery to remove these tumours, called polyps – fleshy stalks that grow on the surface of the bowel – which can develop into cancer in one in ten cases if left untreated.

Non-surgical methods include cutting them away using tiny needles attached to a flexible tube, or burning them away using a wire ‘lasso’.

Bear claw: The full-thickness resection device (FTRD) can be used to remove diseased tissue from hard-to-treat patients in just 45 minutes

Bear claw: The full-thickness resection device (FTRD) can be used to remove diseased tissue from hard-to-treat patients in just 45 minutes

But these are not an option if the tumour cells are also beneath the surface of the bowel wall.

If surgeons remove only the surface cells, the cancer risk remains. Take too much, and there is a risk of tearing the bowel wall, leading to life-threatening infection.

This could result in the need for major surgery via large incisions in the abdomen.

But in a UK first, a physician at Southampton General Hospital is using the new ‘bear claw’ device – properly known as a full-thickness resection device (FTRD) – to remove diseased tissue from hard-to-treat patients in just 45 minutes.

There is no need for a scalpel and a vastly reduced risk of perforating the bowel.

The FTRD is essentially a cap that can be clipped to a colonoscope, a thin, flexible tube that can be passed up into the bowel via the back passage.

Major breakthrough: There is no need for a scalpel and a vastly reduced risk of perforating the bowel

Major breakthrough: There is no need for a scalpel and a vastly reduced risk of perforating the bowel

It contains a mechanical grabber, a bit like a crocodile clip, which pinches the diseased tissue, pulling it up into the tube of the cap.

The ‘bear claw’ clip, so-called by doctors because of its curved shape, is inside the tube and held open under tension.

This is released and clamps shut, both cutting away the growth and closing up the wound as it is left in place as a ‘staple’.

Dr Philip Boger, a consultant in gastroenterology at Southampton, says the procedure marks a ‘milestone’ as many patients would no longer be faced with major abdominal surgery.

Common: Bowel cancer is the third most common cancer in the UK, with about 40,000 new cases diagnosed every year

Common: Bowel cancer is the third most common cancer in the UK, with about 40,000 new cases diagnosed every year

He has performed the produced on just three patients so far, but says: ‘Until now we have not been able to treat certain tumours that lie deeper beneath the surface of the bowel without opting for surgery, due to the risk of perforation and bleeding.’

Bowel cancer is the third most common cancer in the UK, with about 40,000 new cases diagnosed every year. Around nine out of ten patients are over 60, and up to a quarter of cases need surgery.

Dr Boger added that pre-cancerous tumours were being identified earlier thanks to the NHS bowel-screening programme, which was launched nine years ago.

Similar equipment to the FTRD already exists, but is only able to remove a thin layer of tissue. A major bonus of the new procedure is that it can be carried out under sedation – as the bowel wall has no pain nerves. This means patients can return home the same day.

Retired care worker Gwen Smith was the first patient to be treated using the bear claw after a previous procedure had failed to remove all of her tumour due to risk of perforation. The 73-year-old’s tumour was beneath the surface of the bowel lining. If left, there was a risk it would become cancerous and spread to the lymph nodes.

She faced two options: major abdominal surgery with high risk of then needing to be fitted with a stoma bag, or treatment using the bear claw at Southampton General.

‘When I was offered the option of avoiding major surgery I was delighted,’ says Mrs Smith, from Christchurch, Dorset.

‘I’m a fit and active pensioner and the thought of having to stay in hospital for several days, and possibly having a bag, was not appealing.

‘It all happened so quickly. I went down for my operation at 9.15am, was given a sedative and it was all over in 45 minutes. I was home by 12.45.’

Dr Boger adds: ‘Many of our patients are elderly and there is additional risk to them from major surgery. With Mrs Smith, we were able to completely remove the mass using the FTRD, quickly with minimal discomfort for the patient, minimal risk and very little recovery time.’

 
Never Too Young: A message from Bowel Cancer UK
 

 

.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
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Statins Shown To Control Some Cancers

Statins Shown To Control Some Cancers.

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Statins slash risk of death by cancer: They slow tumour growth by up to 50% reveal major studies

  • Experts say there is ‘overwhelming’ evidence that statins can treat cancer
  • Study showed they cut death rates for bone cancer patients by 55 per cent
  • GPs should make patients aware of pills’ new benefits, researchers say
Experts say there is now 'overwhelming' evidence that statins, which were designed to fight heart attacks and strokes, can be effective against cancer

Experts say there is now ‘overwhelming’ evidence that statins, which were designed to fight heart attacks and strokes, can be effective against cancer

Taking statins can cut your risk of dying from cancer by up to 50 per cent, two major studies have shown.

While the drugs do not seem to prevent cancer in the first place, it is believed they boost survival rates by slowing the rate at which tumours grow. 

Experts say the evidence is overwhelming that, as well preventing heart attacks and strokes, statins can be as effective at fighting cancer as conventional treatments such as chemotherapy.

A study involving almost 150,000 women found those taking statins, whether initially healthy or not, were 22 per cent less likely to die from any form of cancer than those not on the drugs.

But this effect varied between the different types of the disease. For breast cancer, statins reduced death rates by 40 per cent, for ovarian by 42 per cent and bowel by 43 per cent. 

For bone cancer, which is rarer, death rates were cut by more than half – 55 per cent. 

A separate study on 22,110 men with prostate cancer found that those who happened to be taking statins were 43 per cent less likely to die from the illness.

Researchers say GPs should make patients aware of the cancer-fighting benefits of the pills as it may sway their decision to start taking them.

Around seven million adults in Britain take statins – the most commonly prescribed drugs in the UK – to lower cholesterol levels. 

They cost just 3p a day and work by stopping the accumulation on blood vessel walls of cholesterol deposits which trigger heart attacks and strokes.

Last summer, the NHS issued new guidance saying the pills should offered to 17million adults – 40 per cent of the population – on the basis they could save up to 2,000 lives a year. 

There is growing evidence that statins may also reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. 

But many doctors are suspicious about their long-term safety and say drugs firms have downplayed their side effects, which affect one in ten and include nosebleeds, muscle pain, a sore throat and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

Nonetheless two studies presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology conference in Chicago, one from Yale University in Connecticut and the other from Rutgers University in New Jersey, show statins may help prevent cancer.

For breast cancer (pictured), statins reduced death rates by 40 per cent, for ovarian by 42 per cent and bowel by 43 per cent. For bone cancer, which is rarer, death rates were cut by more than half 

Researchers believe that, by reducing cholesterol, the pills also lower the levels of certain hormones – androgens – which encourage tumour growth. 

As well as being rendered less aggressive, the tumours are less likely to return, they say. So if someone who is taking statins gets cancer, they are more likely to survive.

Professor Noel Clarke of the Christie NHS hospital in Manchester, which specialises in treating cancer, said GPs should discuss statins with patients at high risk of cancer.

‘The balance of evidence says that statins have an anti-cancer effect,’ he said. ‘Therefore if someone is in a situation where there is increased risk of cancer, be it prostate cancer or breast, then a discussion could be had about the risks and benefits of statins. ’

GPs are being urged to make patients aware of the cancer-fighting properties of the pills, but some family doctors are concerned by the side effects

In the Yale study, researchers looked at the records of 146,326 women aged 50 to 79 over a 15-year period. 

Those taking statins were on average 22 per cent less likely to die from any form of cancer, regardless of how long they had been on the drugs.

Ange Wang, of the Stanford University School of Medicine said: ‘We’re definitely very excited by these results.’ 

Referring to whether GPs should prescribe statins for cancer prevention, she added: ‘I think it should be a priority, given how common statins are.’

The Rutgers study showed that men with prostate cancer were 42 per cent less likely to die from the disease if they were taking either statins or metformin –a diabetes drug.

Lead researcher Grace Lu-Yao said tests on rats had shown that taking statins and metformin were as effective as the common chemotherapy drug docetaxel in treating prostate cancer.

Despite the benefits of statins, a number of leading doctors and academics oppose prescribing them widely to healthy adults because of possible long-term side effects.

Recently a professor who had advocated widespread use of statins announced he was carrying out a review into their safety.

Sir Rory Collins of Oxford University is to examine the records of tens of thousands of patients to establish how many may have suffered side effects.

Six of the 12 experts who drew-up NHS guidance on the drugs have received funding from firms that manufacture statins.

SCREEN WOMEN IN THEIR 30s FOR BREAST CANCER GENE, EXPERTS SAY 

Women in their 30s should be offered screening to assess their risk of breast cancer, experts say.

They are calling for the NHS to offer simple blood tests to identify genetic faults that increase the likelihood of the disease. 

Around one woman in 400 carries mutations in her BRCA1 or 2 genes that increase their risk of breast or ovarian cancer by up to 90 per cent.

Actress Angelina Jolie, 39, chose to have her breasts and ovaries removed because her chances of getting cancer were so high. 

Researchers say women should be offered a simple blood test to examine whether they carry the BRCA1 or 2 genes that increase their risk of breast or ovarian cancer by up to 90 per cent (file image)

Researchers say women should be offered a simple blood test to examine whether they carry the BRCA1 or 2 genes that increase their risk of breast or ovarian cancer by up to 90 per cent (file image)

But many women are unaware they carry these genes. Researchers say the current system, which relies on GPs referring women for tests if they have a family history of cancer, at best identifies less than two in three.

About 80 per cent of women with the genes will go on to develop breast cancer – there are 2,200 such cases in the UK each year. 

The illness usually develops in their 30s and 40s and about half die because tumours are very aggressive.

Dr Elizabeth Swisher, professor of medical genetics at Washington University in Seattle, said routine NHS screening for women in their 30s was a ‘no brainer.’

But NICE, the NHS rationing body, is unlikely to see it as cost-effective to offer the tests, which would cost around £200 a time to all women.

However Dr Swisher, who yesterday led a debate at the American Society for Clinical Oncology conference, said: ‘It would definitely save lives. Not only are they aggressive cancers, they are early onset so you have a lot of years of life to save.’

To view the original article CLICK HERE

.

.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
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Keeping Your Hair On Through Chemo

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Keeping Your Hair in Chemo

To view the original article CLICK HERE

.
Regards,
Greg_L-W.
.
 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

.
If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
.
Thoughts, articles and comments will be in chronological order in the main blog and can be tracked in the >ARCHIVE< in the Left Sidebar.
.
You may find the TABS >MEDICAL LINKS< and also >CANCER LINKS< of help, also many of the links in articles and >HOT LINKS< in the Sidebar.
.
YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
Accuracy & Copyright Statement: CLICK HERE
Summary, archive, facts & comments on UKIP: http://UKIP-vs-EUkip.com
DO MAKE USE of LINKS & >Right Side Bar< & The Top Bar >PAGES<
Also:
Details & Links: http://GregLanceWatkins.com
UKIP Its ASSOCIATES & DETAILS: CLICK HERE
Views I almost Totally Share: CLICK HERE
General Stuff archive: http://gl-w.blogspot.com
General Stuff ongoing: http://gl-w.com
Health Blog. Archive: http://GregLW.blogspot.com
Health Blog. Ongoing: http:GregLW.com

TWITTER: Greg_LW

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The British NHS – vs – Provision In The USA

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The British NHS – vs – Provision In The USA

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Hi,
HAI Prevention 01
we have all listened endlessly to the worst aspects of the NHS from the media and due to the crass ineptitude of Aneurin Bevan’s implementation of Lor Beveridge’s Report, which laid out the plan for the NHS that all three parties had agreed must not be a political football – to that end it was agreed that whichever party was elected they would implement the ‘Plan’.

Sadly Labour won and were thus charged with the task of implementing the launch of The NHS and unfortunately Aneurin Bevan was appointed Minister of Health and he just couldn’t resist tampering with the plan.

Aneurin Bevan’s wife was the openly stated Communist Jennie Lee and that became all too obvious when Beveridge’s initial plan had been that ‘The NHS would deliver a health service, free at the point of need, funded by the tax payer by contribution’ A concept that was soon defiled by Aneurin Bevan such that it is now more commonly portrayed as ‘a health service, free at the point of need, provided by the Government’.

HEART 01
This has led to it being all too clearly a life style service delivering whatever buys the most votes, with large areas of privatisation introduced by the Labour Party, through the back door, with a system of Private Public Finance deals selling off thwe long term viability of the NHS in return for showy short term ‘schemes’.

All too often long waits are an inherent part of the service for routine matters, with waiting times of 18 months or so for some medical appointments.

Although waiting times are considered too long in A&E emergency needs are treated incredibly quickly – though imn the one part of the service under the control of Labour the situation is considerably worse, Wales currently has the worst delivery of any of Britain’s EU Regions.

That said the NHS is still a shinning beacon to much of the world, in fact to almost all of the world and is used as a training ground for both nurses and doctors from all over the world.

One mistake often made is to claim the NHS is Free -sadly not, the NHS is Britain’s largest employer and absorbs a huge slice of the national Tax pie – hardly free!

Consider some thoughts on the subject from America:

Damn, the “Rolls Royce isn’t moving fast enough.”

This is how Jim Edwards, an American-British dual citizen, characterizes actually having to wait to be seen by a highly-trained medical professional in his outstanding first-person account of NHS treatment.

The context here is that the NHS just released its most recent stats on accident and emergency room waiting times. The headline number is that 84% of patients are seen within four hours. In the UK, this is regarded as a huge failure — the standard the NHS is supposed to meet is 95% of patients in four hours. The UK media went into a fury about it, and some hospitals have begun postponing and rescheduling some non-emergency procedures in order to get those waiting times down.In the US, having sat in many an ER waiting room for hours at a stretch, the idea of a hospital seeing nearly 9 out of 10 patients in four hours would be regarded as a miracle. Bear in mind that within that four-hour period the NHS doctors are triaging patients: If you get hit by a bus, you’re going to see someone instantly. If you broke a finger because you fell over while drunk at the pub, you’re probably going to wait at the back of the line. It’s not like people are literally bleeding to death while they wait for attention (although the British media loves it when it finds individual cases where that has happened).

So my overall impression is that currently, the Brits’ complaints that the NHS isn’t hitting that 95% mark is akin to saying, “This Rolls Royce isn’t moving fast enough!”

Amen, Brother.This article is worth reading carefully and in full, because it perfectly frames the greatest weakness of the American approach to health care: there is no system; literally we have a non-system of health care. Nothing is coordinated; the all-mighty $ is the only unifying logic to our so-called “system.”

Because there is an actual system, patients experience significantly less aggravation with accessing health care. Paperwork?

There is a load of paperwork for patients in the US. This is easily the worst aspect of US healthcare — the billing paperwork. If you’ve ever had any health issue that required more than a simple doctor visit, you will know that it precipitates a seemingly never-ending series of forms, bills, and letters. You can be paying bills months, years later. And it’s almost impossible to correct a billing error. It’s stressful. I developed an intense hatred for health insurance companies in the US because of this.There was close to zero paperwork in the NHS. I filled in a form telling my doc who I was and where I lived, and that was pretty much it. The only other paperwork I got was a letter in the mail reminding me of my next appointment. They sent me a text reminder, too, which no American doc has ever done. It was incredibly refreshing.

But, wait, the absence of insurance forms must — in some bizarre way — make UK doctors of lower quality. Well, not really.

The treatment from my primary care GP was the same in the UK as it was in the US. I’ve had great care from 95% of doctors I’ve ever seen in both the US and the UK. Doctors are doctors. They’re mostly really nice and good at what they do. The system that pays them doesn’t seem to make them better or worse.

I won’t reproduce the entire story here, because I want you to read it, but I will end with a reminder that this patient — who underwent specialist treatment at a hospital for fear he was going deaf — paid ZERO at point-of-use for his care. (Yes, of course, he paid payroll tax, but he probably paid much less than you pay in Medicare tax and premiums and cost-sharing and co-pays and deductibles and time wasted filling out forms and time wasted waiting for inefficient medical practices to see patients.)

So how much did all this NHS care cost me? £0. Nothing. Zero. I paid not a penny for some top-notch healthcare. There is no such thing as a “free,” of course, but the per-capita cost of healthcare in the UK (paid by the government via tax collections) is generally lower than the US, according to the World Health Organization. Americans spend $8,362  per capita on healthcare annually, the Brits spend $3,480. Here is a breakdown:NHS prices

Doctor visit: £0
Specialist: £0
Diagnostic test: £0
MRI: £0
Total: £0
Typical US prices*

Doctor visit: $100
Specialist: $150
Hearing test: $72
MRI: $1,000
Total: $1,372 (Total payable by the patient in cash, or typically 90% from insurance and 10% as a patient copay. Prices taken from Healthcare Bluebook.)

To me, those US prices seem pretty low — and remember, if Jim was uninsured in the US, he’d pay whatever the hell the hospital wanted to charge him for each of those things. You know, “chargemaster” and all.Jim’s final verdict? US or UK?

The bottom line: I prefer the NHS to the American private system. It’s a little more inconvenient in terms of appointment times, but due to the fact that it is free, has no paperwork, and the treatment on the day is super-fast, the NHS wins. That Rolls Royce is moving at a pretty decent clip.And, of course, there is the small matter of the fact that the NHS covers everyone equally, whereas Americans get care based on their ability to pay, leaving tens of millions with only minimal access to care. (Obamacare is changing that, but it’s leagues behind the NHS if you’re comparing them by the standard of universal full-service coverage.)

Americans think they have the best healthcare in the world. Take it from me, a fellow American: They don’t.

As a dual American-European citizen myself, who has accessed the UK NHS on several occasions while living in London, I would completely agree with Jim. And it’s really not just about the money (although it feels great to know that a single trip the ER won’t rob you of $1,000) — as this narrative points out. It’s also about the forms, the frustration and wasted time. Over a lifetime of dealing with Aetna or Cigna and profit-driven hospital billing departments, how much time do you waste on the 1-800 number? How much of that time could you be spending drinking a beer? Talking to a loved one? Taking a nap? Walking in the park?The American health care non-system is a disaster — this article is a good reminder of how a decent society handles things in a more civilized way. Please share widely.

To view the original article CLICK HERE
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Regards,
Greg_L-W.
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 Please Be Sure To
& Link to my My Blogs
To Spread The Facts World Wide To Give Others HOPE
I Have Been Fighting Cancer since 1997 & I’M STILL HERE!
I Have Cancer, Cancer Does NOT Have Me
I just want to say sorry for copping out at times and leaving Lee and friends to cope!
Any help and support YOU can give her will be hugely welcome.
I do make a lousy patient!

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If YOU want to follow my fight against Cancer from when it started and I first presented with symptoms in 1998 see The TAB at the Header of this Blog. called >DIARY of Cancer ….< just click and it will give you a long list of the main events in chronological order, many linked to specific blog postings.
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YOU are welcome to call me, minded that I am NOT medically trained, if you believe I can help in ANY way. .

Posted by: Greg Lance-Watkins

tel: 01594 – 528 337
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